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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:50 pm 
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Read this FT Article about Mino. My favorite story is his encounter with Luciano Moggi. :lol: :lol:

Quote:
Mino Raiola: meet the super-agent behind Pogba and Ibrahimovic

The Dutch-Italian dealmaker on the family pizza business, the art of negotiation and which footballers he’s eyeing next

Simon Kuper

OCTOBER 28, 2016

If you had to guess Mino Raiola’s job from his appearance and clothing, you would say: small-town pizzeria waiter on his day off. In fact, Raiola grew up working in his family’s restaurant, and his service remains impeccable. From the moment we meet in his pied-à-terre beneath his parents’ flat, on a drab downtown avenue in the Dutch town of Haarlem, he tries to anticipate my every need. Where exactly would I like to sit? Can he get me an energy drink? Am I too hot with my jacket on?

This chubby, bespectacled little Dutch-Italian is arguably the world’s most influential football agent. It’s no coincidence that Manchester United this summer signed three of his clients: Paul Pogba (for a world record transfer fee of £89.3m), Zlatan Ibrahimovic and Henrikh Mkhitaryan. Raiola’s select stable also includes Mario Balotelli, the great unfulfilled talent of the current generation. Like Raiola or hate him (as Sir Alex Ferguson does), he helps shape the transfer market. He is one of the major forces determining which players end up at which clubs.

To help me understand how he learnt his business, Raiola walks me the few hundred yards from his pied-à-terre to the spot where it all began — Haarlem’s beautiful, ancient Grote Markt or “Big Market” square. The family had moved to Haarlem from southern Italy in 1968, when Raiola was an infant. Several branches migrated together; he says about 35 of them lived in three adjoining houses. The Raiolas opened a pizza restaurant, Napoli, on the Grote Markt.

We sink into the outdoor chairs of the Italian restaurant that now occupies the spot. The owner brings me a free espresso, while Raiola surveys his former domain. A passer-by waves and Raiola calls out, “Hey, how’s it going?” — before turning to me and adding, “No idea who that was.”

He reminisces, “My dad worked 18, sometimes 20 hours a day here. At work he is extreme. When I was 11 or 12, I went to work with my dad to get to know him. He was in the kitchen, so what could I do? I could wash up. I still like washing up. It gives me a sort of peace to clean things, to see the instant result of your work.”

Soon, little Mino was dressed in a costume and waiting tables. The work honed his gift for talking to people (generally twice as fast as a normal person). He’d ask customers what they felt like eating, then come up with a personalised menu. If a regular customer was getting divorced, the boy would sit him down for a heart-to-heart. The business model worked: by Raiola’s count, the family ended up with 11 restaurants. 

Raiola spoke better Dutch than his father and, as a teenager, was already negotiating with banks for him or popping in on Haarlem’s mayor. He also spoke fluent Italian, or at least Neapolitan. When a restaurant customer complained of trouble with his Italian suppliers, Raiola sorted things out. He founded a company, Intermezzo, which helped Dutch companies do business in Italy. 

On the side, aged 19, he became a millionaire by buying a local McDonald’s and selling it to a property developer. After that, he says, he stopped being driven by money. His passion in his scant spare time was football. He had been a decent youth player, and in his early twenties, after dropping out of a law degree, he became technical director of the local professional club, FC Haarlem (now defunct). He developed an audacious plan to sign the brilliant teenager Dennis Bergkamp from Ajax Amsterdam but soon fell out with Haarlem’s other directors — stuffy old conservatives, Raiola thought.

In 1992 Intermezzo helped with the transfer of Dutch winger Bryan Roy from Ajax to Foggia in Italy. Raiola’s personal service included spending seven months with Roy in Foggia, and helping paint the player’s house. While in Foggia, Raiola met his future wife. He also got to know the peculiar world of professional football. 

As an outsider who physically resembled the rotund English fictional character Billy Bunter, Raiola was sometimes snubbed by insiders. He was often asked, “Who are you?” But the disdain was mutual. He recalls: “I was absolutely not impressed.” Many of football’s leading executives had been appointed chiefly because they were clubbable ex-players. “Incest makes that world weak,” he says. “It’s dumb because they want to keep it dumb. It’s a closed world, with gigantic potential, and a huge turnover of money, but often managed by people of whom I think, ‘What the f***?’”

A rare smart executive, in Raiola’s view, was Luciano Moggi. The first time Raiola went to meet him, in the early 1990s, when Moggi was technical director of the Italian club Torino, the appointment was for 11am. Raiola, compulsively punctual, showed up at 10.45am. “I was brought into a room and it was like going to the dentist: there were about 25 people, all smoking and looking at things and talking. At 11.15am nobody had come to me, so I go to the secretary and say, ‘Please can you tell Mr Moggi I’m waiting, and can you tell me how long he will be?’ She looked at me and said, ‘All those people are waiting for Mr Moggi.’”

Raiola, a twentysomething with scarcely any contacts in football, politely informed her he was walking out.

“Two hours later I ran into Moggi in a restaurant. With him was an entourage of those 25 people, who had come out for lunch.” In Raiola’s telling, he went up and had the following conversation: 

Raiola: Are you Mr Moggi? Moggi: Yes. Raiola: I find it very rude that you made me wait. Moggi: Who are you? Raiola: I am Raiola. Moggi: Ah, you’re Raiola. If you’re this unpleasant to me, you will never sell a player in Italy.

Soon, however, Raiola was selling players in Italy. In Foggia he had got to know the club’s coach, a workaholic Czech named Zdenek Zeman. They had talked football obsessively. One day Raiola told him, “The footballer you want doesn’t exist. That’s the perfect footballer: one who runs 17km a match, dribbles like Maradona, and can train harder than you can imagine.”

But then, in the mid-1990s, through contacts in the Czech Republic, Raiola spotted Zeman’s perfect footballer — another Czech, Pavel Nedved. Raiola today says: “Pavel Nedved is an extremist. The only thing he thinks of himself is that he can’t play football. But he can train harder than the rest.” Nedved would train at his club as a kind of aperitif, and then come home and train much harder in his garden. In 1996, Raiola sold Nedved to Zeman’s new club, Lazio in Rome.

The two Czechs reinforced the lesson Raiola had learnt from his dad: “extremists” succeed. Raiola became one himself. For more than 20 years now, he has travelled around Europe with a small suitcase, working. “It has cost me things,” he admits. “I haven’t seen my children grow up.” He and his family live in Monaco, only partly for tax reasons, he says.

If Raiola ever writes his autobiography (as he sometimes threatens to), he should call it The Art of the Deal. Contract negotiations, he says, are “my matches”. There’s a telling vignette in “Thank You, Mino”, an account by former Dutch footballer Rody Turpijn of his own transfer from Ajax to little De Graafschap in 1998. Raiola and Turpijn went to meet De Graafschap’s chairman in an unsightly motorway hotel. After Raiola’s opening rave about Nedved, which was both heartfelt and a calculated display of status, the chairman jotted down the salary he was offering Turpijn. “Doesn’t look bad,” thought Turpijn. It was more than he earned at Ajax. Anyway, De Graafschap was the only club that wanted him.

But Raiola exclaimed, “Do you know what he earns at Ajax? This isn’t a serious offer. Come Rody, we aren’t going to waste our time.” He got up to leave, so Turpijn dutifully rose too. The chairman pleaded with them to stay. In the next 20 minutes Raiola negotiated a contract (including every imaginable extra) that, writes Turpijn, “largely secured my future. Not only for the four years that I would play for De Graafschap, but just about for the rest of my life.”

The story illustrates one of Raiola’s maxims: even the smallest transfer can change somebody’s life.

Raiola regularly urged Turpijn to be more like Nedved. It didn’t happen: after a disappointing stint at De Graafschap, Turpijn retired from football aged 25, and happily went off to university. However, Raiola’s approach worked on a more ambitious young Ajax footballer he encountered in about 2001 — a Swedish striker of Yugoslav origin named Zlatan Ibrahimovic.

Raiola is a central character in I Am Zlatan, Ibrahimovic’s autobiography. No wonder, because perhaps the key influence on the modern footballer’s career is his agent. The relationship is often closer than the much-discussed but typically transient one between coach and player. This is especially true of Raiola, who keeps his stable of players small so as to offer each one a personal service.

The two immigrant boys met in Amsterdam’s chic Japanese restaurant Yamazato. Ibrahimovic had dressed in a suit. “But who the hell turned up? A bloke in jeans and a Nike T-shirt — and that belly, well, like one of the guys in The Sopranos,” he writes in his book. (Raiola believes that not wearing a suit is an advantage, as it leads people to underestimate him.)

Raiola can do good cop or bad cop, and he knew which one Ibrahimovic would respect. As Ibrahimovic tells it, Raiola disdained the Japanese dishes and, while scarfing down enough pasta for six people, berated the striker for underachievement. He asked Ibrahimovic his standard question for footballers: “Do you want to be the best in the world? Or the player who earns most and can show off the most stuff?” Of course Ibrahimovic replied that he wanted to be the best.

The Swede was impressed. He recounts phoning Raiola afterwards to ask him to be his agent: 

Raiola: [Long pause] All right. But if you’re going to work with me, you must do what I say. Ibrahimovic: Sure, absolutely. Raiola: Sell your cars, your watches, and start training three times as hard. Because your stats are rubbish.

Soon Ibrahimovic was working like Nedved. By this time, Raiola’s old enemy Moggi had moved to Italian club Juventus. One day he phoned Raiola to inquire about signing Nedved from Lazio. Raiola recounts the conversation:

Raiola: Do you have a watch? Moggi: Look, don’t be unpleasant. Yes I do. Raiola: What time are we meeting? Moggi: 12pm, in Florence. Raiola: I’ll be there at 11.50am. But I’m leaving at 12.10pm, and then the price doubles.

By 12.10pm Moggi hadn’t shown up, so Raiola left. Nedved did end up joining Juventus, and in 2003 won the Golden Ball award for Europe’s best footballer. Now retired, he remains in touch with Raiola. That’s Raiola: close to his players, hostile to clubs and authorities. (Football’s governing body Fifa once fined him for calling its president Sepp Blatter “a senile dictator”, after which Raiola briefly tried to run for Fifa’s presidency.)

Many of Raiola’s players treat him as an all-purpose helpmeet. Mario Balotelli once phoned him to say his house was on fire; Raiola advised him to try the fire brigade. Nowadays Raiola’s younger players FaceTime him. He moves around imitating them as they hold up their phones to show him things they want to buy: “‘I’m walking through the house. What do you think of it?’” He chuckles fondly.

Does he regard his players as friends? “Ninety-nine per cent of them, yes,” he replies.

So he doesn’t see Pogba as a client? “I don’t see him as a client at all. In fact I dare to say, family.”

I suggest that Raiola has turned the model of a family pizzeria serving a clientele of regulars into a football agency. His eyes brighten: “Unconsciously, yes. When you say that I get a little gooseflesh. And it’s true — we didn’t see ourselves as a pizzeria.”

What were you then? “A home. You came to eat at our home.”

His business model informs the layout of his Haarlem workspace: footballers tend to feel uncomfortable in offices, so the place is essentially structured as a kitchen, with a screen in the corner to show matches. On a kitchen rack is a plate inscribed, “Ristorante Napoli, Haarlem”.

It’s commonly thought that clubs and coaches decide which players to sign. Often, though, the driving force is the agent. Raiola explains, “I always try to formulate a goal with a player: ‘That is what we want. We’re not going to sit and wait and see where the wind blows.’” In 2004 he decided Ibrahimovic should join Italy’s most “extreme” club: Juventus. Dressed in beach shorts and soggy with sweat after an unscheduled sprint through Turin, he did the deal with Moggi for a transfer fee of €16m.

At Juve, Ibrahimovic saw for himself how hard Nedved trained. “I thought you were exaggerating, but it’s true,” he told Raiola. Nedved told the young striker, “You don’t know what you’ve got.” Ibrahimovic merged the Czech’s work ethic with his own superior talent.

The striker’s 15-year European odyssey reveals one of Raiola’s gifts: anticipating changes in the transfer market. Raiola says, “It sounds arrogant. I saw every change in the football world coming before it happened.” In 2006 it emerged that Moggi habitually phoned referees assigned to Juve matches before the game. Raiola realised that Juve would suffer for this. Months before the club was punished by relegation to Italy’s second division, he arranged Ibrahimovic’s transfer to Inter Milan. In 2009 he moved him to Barcelona — a transfer that went wrong when coach Pep Guardiola dropped the player. Any mention of Guardiola’s name still jolts Raiola into almost instinctive tirades (“a coward”, “no balls” etc) but he quickly dispatched Ibrahimovic to AC Milan.

Then, in 2012, Raiola pushed the player out of Italy. “He didn’t want to go at all. But I’d been telling Milan for years, ‘You can’t afford these salaries any more.’” Italy’s football economy was declining, while rich Qataris had bought Paris Saint-Germain. Ibrahimovic reluctantly moved to Paris — where he earned €14m a year in a top-class team while Milan sank.

Ibrahimovic, after 15 years as a Raiola client, is now cumulatively the second-most expensive footballer in history, after Angel Di María. In that time, clubs have paid an estimated total of €131m in transfer fees for the Swede, whose career alone would have been enough to make Raiola rich. When I ask if he takes 10 per cent of a player’s salary, he replies: “Or more, or less. But that is agreed and is very transparent.” However, he insists that he considers money merely a byproduct of good work.

Guiding players’ careers sometimes goes wrong. Raiola’s greatest failure may be the Italian striker Mario Balotelli, who is now with modest Nice, his huge talent unfulfilled. Raiola says that Balotelli has often been distracted from achievement by falling in love: “Balotelli has chosen, unconsciously or consciously, not to put football in the middle of his life. So there were always marginal phenomena that influenced his performances. Zlatan doesn’t have that, Pogba doesn’t, Nedved doesn’t. But Ouasim Bouy [an unfulfilled Dutch talent on Raiola’s rota] doesn’t have that either.”

Does Raiola share some blame for Balotelli’s failure?

“Yes. A big mistake I made in his career was to let him go from Manchester City to Milan, against my advice. I should have said, ‘You succeed with City, that’s it, period. If I’d done that, hard, he would have.”

I suggest that many footballers, possibly including Balotelli, don’t particularly want to reach the top. Why should they? They can make millions without knocking themselves out.

“Well, that’s right,” replies Raiola. “That’s why in my recent conversations I have an important question for players: ‘Why do you play football? What is your drive?’”

What do they answer?

“Well, most haven’t thought about it yet. I send them home saying, ‘Go think about it.’”

A few years ago, Raiola unearthed a French talent with unquestionable drive. Paul Pogba was then a teenage hopeful at Manchester United. He hadn’t broken into the first team and Raiola told him he was underpaid, but added that perhaps he ought to stay anyway, especially as United had a “fantastic manager”, Alex Ferguson. However, in 2012 Raiola asked United for a better contract. He breaks into English to recount the negotiations: 

Ferguson to Raiola: I don’t talk to you if the player is not here. Raiola: Get the player out of the locker room and sit him here. Pogba enters. Ferguson to Pogba: You don’t want to sign this contract? Pogba: We’re not going to sign this contract under these conditions. Ferguson to Raiola: You’re a twat.

Raiola was unfazed, partly because he didn’t know the word.

Raiola: This is an offer that my chihuahuas — I have two chihuahuas — don’t sign. Ferguson: What do you think he needs to earn? Raiola: Not that. Ferguson: You’re a twat.

Ferguson’s published verdict on Raiola: “I distrusted him from the moment I met him.”

Raiola canvassed Europe’s leading clubs to decide which one Pogba should join. “Juventus said, ‘We want him at any cost. This is the best player we’ve seen in the world.’ However, Juve historically had little patience with youngsters. Raiola told Pogba: “This maybe isn’t a good step for you.” Yet Pogba was set on joining the Italian club.

Raiola says he negotiated a salary that marked Pogba out as a valued first-team player. Afterwards he asked him: “Why did you want to go there?” Pogba replied, “Because in my life I have always chosen the hardest path. This was the hardest path.” He performed brilliantly at Juve, winning four straight Italian titles.

This summer, Raiola brought Ibrahimovic and Pogba to United. Why join a club that hadn’t qualified for the Champions League and has underperformed for three years? Raiola explains, “Because I think: you have go to the club that needs you. This club needed them.”

He had foreseen United’s need as early as summer 2015, when the club signed the young forwards Anthony Martial and Memphis Depay. Raiola claims to have known they wouldn’t succeed. “Not if you have to perform now,” he says, slapping a fat fist into a fat hand. “Martial and Depay come in and say, ‘We have to carry Manchester United, a giant institute?’ So already last year I told the people at United, ‘You’ll have to put in a guy like Zlatan to restore the balance.’ Then the attention goes to Zlatan. He has the experience, and dares take the responsibility.”

And, says Raiola, United needed Pogba too. “Look, Pogba could have gone to all the top clubs. But Real Madrid had just won the Champions League. He’d have been a trophy player there. Barcelona — their three trophies are Messi, Neymar and Suarez. What you see is the final result of years of sculpting. I spent two years working on Manchester United’s deal with Paul.”

United’s decision makers evidently trust Raiola. The coach, José Mourinho, has historically preferred to sign players from his own agent, Jorge Mendes, but now seems happy to work with the Dutchman. Raiola says: “I knew Mourinho from Inter, and there we’d had a bad relationship. I’d said things in the newspaper. But I think Mourinho is intelligent enough to understand what I do. At clubs that understand me, I have three or four players. Now at United, and before at Juventus, Milan, Paris Saint-Germain.” In these cases, says Raiola, he becomes a club’s “in-house consultant”. Logically, then, he must share some blame for United’s current dismal performances.

United paid a world record transfer fee of €105m for Pogba in August. Raiola has said he takes only a cut of his players’ salary — but what about media reports that the clubs paid him €20m, as a percentage of the transfer fee? “I can’t talk about the contract but, in a deal like Pogba’s, it’s not just the clubs who earn from it,” he says.

Were you paid a fee by Juventus?

“No — not in the way that you’re saying it.”

So you did get money from Juventus?

“I have to see how I can phrase this in a way that Juventus cannot tackle me through the law, let’s say. Hmm. How can I say it? [Long pause.] Yes: in this deal Juventus was not the only owner of the player’s rights.”

But third-party ownership of players (TPO) has been banned?

“Not then. Only afterwards [by Fifa in 2015].”

So until TPO was banned, you often owned stakes in players?

“Not often. But sometimes.”

And Pogba was one of them?

“It’s not TPO. Be careful with the legal definition of TPO. But let’s say that in that case there was an upside for our side. And by our side, I mean the player’s side.”

Which isn’t allowed any more?

“It’s not allowed any more.”

Juventus says, “No third party had any ownership of the player’s rights.”

Raiola boasts of having had great players in every era, and is busily planning ahead. “There are eight, nine players in the Brazilian [youth] team, each one better than the next. I have [Gianluigi] Donnarumma at AC Milan, who’s 17 and is already their goalkeeper. I have a top striker at Juventus, Moise Kean, 16 years old, who might make his debut this year.” Raiola doesn’t sound like a man planning to take up golf.

Many footballers lose all their money after they retire. England’s Professional Footballers Association has estimated that 10 to 20 per cent of ex-players go bankrupt. This is something Raiola thinks about a lot. “Look, you now have players who can earn €50m to €200m [over their careers]. How do you invest that — or not? Players are always getting offers from people.” He puts on an overexcited young voice: “‘Mino, a friend of mine has a real estate company, and they’re going to do this, and I’ll get 14 per cent, guaranteed!’

“But you also have to watch out for banks. Banks want to sell you products too. I now have an [investment] portfolio for various players, which if you add it all up is worth about €900m. And we’re more conservative than conservative. I always say to players, ‘We do not invest.’ We just want the player to finish his career with the money he earned, and more — but not less. What I suggest is, ‘Buy your own house fast, buy bricks, and otherwise keep your money in the bank, even if it’s at low interest. You don’t have to live off the interest. Don’t put it into businesses you know nothing about.

“All my players, in the beginning, want a restaurant, a hotel or a café. I come from the restaurant business and I say, ‘Don’t come to me with that, zero. Because I know what that is.’”

Simon Kuper is an FT columnist

https://www.ft.com/content/548155cc-9bc ... 8a43813464

_________________
metalalloy wrote:
Does the SE have Gray, Mahrez or Albrighton on our team or players of their caliber?


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:04 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:59 pm
Posts: 33211
danfo driver wrote:
kajifu wrote:
danfo driver wrote:
kajifu wrote:
Danfo is it possible for Arsenal to sell Sanchez to Manu and forget about Mkhy?How much is Mkhy salary at united right now?Some people are saying he will take a pay cut to come to Arsenal.My question is why should he take a pay cut when Arsenal need him more than he need Arsenal?Just not make sense at all but what do I know..
Lets see how this transfer window turn out..
Do you know any inside infor about Ozil Contract situation?
@Danfo why is it that only Jose can smart this Raiola guy?Does Raiola work with African players?


Mkhy is NOT taking a pay cut. I mean, even common sense will tell anyone that. Arsenal is going to make him their highest paid player and they will pay Raiola what he wants, or Mkhy is going no where!

No, I dont know any inside info about Ozil. My PERSONAL opinion is that Ozil does not have that many options.

Several things, (1) Mourinho is an agbero and he is feared (2) Mourinho is one of the most respected figures in football and (3) He always works for wealth clubs, so agents dont want to get on his bad side. They know that his clubs pay money and if he blacklists you, you have lost out.

As for Raiola working with African players, here is a list of his clients:

https://www.transfermarkt.com/mino-raio ... erater/282

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Chei this Raiola is the biggest football agent sha.Abeg hook my boy victor Moses with him,its time the match fixer and Roman pay him what he really worth.Danfo tell this Raiola Arsenal is a small club and he should take it easy on us haba.
But why even coaches like Pep don't like to deal with him when they are check book masters?As for Wenger I understand he is cheap


Jorge Mendes is the biggest agent in the world.

Hmm but not a gangster like this Raiola right?
But the two Mendes and Raiola who you think is better to be agent for our African boys?


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:33 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2003 1:17 pm
Posts: 7504
Apparently some important players like the directions their teams are going and are signing long term deals ...
Could Sanchez be making 3-times more than KDB's?
Bepanda
Fernandinho has committed his future to Manchester City – with Kevin De Bruyne the next to sign a lucrative contract extension.
Midfielder Fernandinho, who was out of contract in the summer, has signed a new two-year deal which will keep him at City util 2020.
De Bruyne, City's best player this season, will be the next to follow, with the Belgium star set to sign a new six-year deal that will see his wages leap from £120,000-a-week to £200,000-a-week.
City’s move to tie down Fernandinho, with De Bruyne to follow, is the latest step to secure the long-term futures of key players, with David Silva and Nicolas Otamendi also having penned new deals.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:43 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 1:35 pm
Posts: 48062
tolahs wrote:
I ain't 'tryna' intrude but -

Louis van Gaal reveals he turned down Belgium job to get revenge on 'mean and low' Manchester United

Louis van Gaal has admitted he turned down the chance to manage Belgium so that he could continue to receive compensation for being sacked by Manchester United.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/201 ... -mean-low/


You are not intruding, the person intruding knows he is not welcomed in my discussions and on my ignore list.

Here is our discussion in the matter before the intruder stepped in. Notice the link you posted is part of the discussion.

YemiBrazil wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
YemiBrazil wrote:
Chief Ogbunigwe wrote:
Waffiman wrote:

Wenger is a gentleman....especially after setting his sights on any compensation coming from Man U :sneaky: :sneaky: :sneaky:

If na Mourinho now, he go torpedo the deal that might remotely favor Arsenal, consequences be damned.

If na me be Wenger, I go just scatter the deal last minute just to spite Mourinho :taunt: :taunt: :taunt:
Send him to City on a wink-wink/nod-nod yeye deal, oreven worse, call Conte ask him for Fabregas and Batshuayi for Sanchez.

But I no be Wenger sha...

See this yeye village chief with poor man stronghead :lol: :lol:
Look there are some money that if you spite you are only spiting yourself. Go and ask Louis van Gaal who thought he was 'spiting' United by making them pay the full term of his contract after they fired him (he pain am so tay he conveniently forgot about all the boys he fired as United manager :lol: :lol: ) and lost the opportunity to move on with another job & new challenge forgetting that United can conveniently pay him and his entire lineage for several years without batting an eyelid :D :D
United's money will always help Arsenal and hope they spread the joy to those hardworking and long-suffering boys wearing the jersey under super intense pressure week in week out.


You miss the point. As with all of these contracts, there is the compensatory figure, and the contractual figure. If the compensatory figure on the table is not acceptable to LVG, ManU must pay up his contract in full.

The only way LVG will quit ManU's payroll is if another club gives him a job as lucrative as his ManU contract. I do not see that happening, so he will continue to be on ManU's payroll for the duration of the contract.

I don’t know about your point that was missed and I really don’t you have correct information on Man Utd/LVG contract termination details. The point I was making is that you keep your emotion in check in situations like this. Spiting Mourinho should not be your primary consideration and that’s what LVG figured out - he was quoted as saying he made a stupid decision. Apparently he couldn’t pick another job until the end of his contract with Man United as he went for the jugular to make United pay -
http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/foot ... 60126.html


I am not disagreeing, just adding caveats in what is usually a fraught situation. LVG was treated shabbily, but my guess is he would have preferred not to be on gardening leave had ManU's compensation been as good enough.

In effect ManU has LVG on gardening leave. My point being, it is business. If a club out there want him and can afford it, they will sort out the current situation with ManU. It is a money thing.

What LVG does not disclose is the salary that came with Belgium job. The salary is said to be a basic of half a million going up to £750,000. Van Gaal was due a compensation settlement of £5m to £6m, if reports are to be believed. What we do not know is what ManU offered. But he says he turned it down cos he wanted revenge.

I know LVG talks of the sporting chance missed. It is all well and good saying that now, I maintain, if the salary for the Belgium was half the amount of the ManU compensation, he accepts the job and there will be no talk of revenge.

Now compare and contrast with Martinez the man who got the Belgium job. He was sacked with 3 yrs left of his Everton contract worth £12m. He settled for just over £10m immediate cash payment. For Martinez, taking the Belgium job was perfect, he has all that cash in his bank account, so the sporting chance was his ultimate goal to rebuild his career.

ManU don't want LVG on their pay roll, it is a massive waste to them. So if something comes up, they will gladly be rid of him. But LVG is a man with a huge ego and he cannot be seen to have been shafted in the financial side after been shafted out of his job.

Just my opinion.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:53 am 
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kajifu wrote:
danfo driver wrote:
kajifu wrote:
danfo driver wrote:
kajifu wrote:
Danfo is it possible for Arsenal to sell Sanchez to Manu and forget about Mkhy?How much is Mkhy salary at united right now?Some people are saying he will take a pay cut to come to Arsenal.My question is why should he take a pay cut when Arsenal need him more than he need Arsenal?Just not make sense at all but what do I know..
Lets see how this transfer window turn out..
Do you know any inside infor about Ozil Contract situation?
@Danfo why is it that only Jose can smart this Raiola guy?Does Raiola work with African players?


Mkhy is NOT taking a pay cut. I mean, even common sense will tell anyone that. Arsenal is going to make him their highest paid player and they will pay Raiola what he wants, or Mkhy is going no where!

No, I dont know any inside info about Ozil. My PERSONAL opinion is that Ozil does not have that many options.

Several things, (1) Mourinho is an agbero and he is feared (2) Mourinho is one of the most respected figures in football and (3) He always works for wealth clubs, so agents dont want to get on his bad side. They know that his clubs pay money and if he blacklists you, you have lost out.

As for Raiola working with African players, here is a list of his clients:

https://www.transfermarkt.com/mino-raio ... erater/282

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Chei this Raiola is the biggest football agent sha.Abeg hook my boy victor Moses with him,its time the match fixer and Roman pay him what he really worth.Danfo tell this Raiola Arsenal is a small club and he should take it easy on us haba.
But why even coaches like Pep don't like to deal with him when they are check book masters?As for Wenger I understand he is cheap


Jorge Mendes is the biggest agent in the world.

Hmm but not a gangster like this Raiola right?
But the two Mendes and Raiola who you think is better to be agent for our African boys?


Maybe Raiola. I think for an "outsider," you may need a fighter on your corner.

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metalalloy wrote:
Does the SE have Gray, Mahrez or Albrighton on our team or players of their caliber?


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:56 am 
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platinum wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Tunisian Gooner wrote:


If anyone recalls how long and protracted the Pogba deal was, then you know nothing gets done unless this greedy Agent is paid.

Arsenal do not like Agents like Raiola, so their negotiators have their hands full here. Wenger was clear in his press conference, there is no problem with the player, he said.


You're 100% right, Arsenal doesn't like to deal with these guys. I get the point you're making and the way you're using the term 'greedy'. Are they greedy though? Raiola gets his clients the best financial deal possible always. He has built his brand and business on that. In a way, is Arsenal not the same? Arsenal believes in not overpaying for a player, the club has built it's reputation on that. The Raiola brand is strong and players go to him because they know he will get them top dollar.

*a quick add-on to all this, I am more concerned about the things he does with the smaller, unknown players. That one leaves a sour taste in my mouth. However, it's not just the super agents who do that, it's a norm in that business. The few 'good' guys who promise and deliver are not the norm.
**the role of agents in the sport needs to be addressed but there's so much murkiness and of course money floating around that it is not in the interest of certain powers to address it.


Greedy is my opinion on Agent's like Raiola. That will not change. A friend of mine is an Agent and I call Raiola 'greedy' to his face. I also make him know why I disapprove of his practice. Also, you comparison to Arsenal is a wrong equivalence, like comparing Apple and oranges.

The sooner the game got together and set a minimum and maximum fee for Agent's the better for the game.

I understand the need for Agent's and they do play a role that is helpful, but no Agent's role is worth the money being paid to the likes of Raiola.

The game should get together and be rid of them.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:57 am 
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bepanda wrote:
Apparently some important players like the directions their teams are going and are signing long term deals ...
Could Sanchez be making 3-times more than KDB's?
Bepanda
Fernandinho has committed his future to Manchester City – with Kevin De Bruyne the next to sign a lucrative contract extension.
Midfielder Fernandinho, who was out of contract in the summer, has signed a new two-year deal which will keep him at City util 2020.
De Bruyne, City's best player this season, will be the next to follow, with the Belgium star set to sign a new six-year deal that will see his wages leap from £120,000-a-week to £200,000-a-week.
City’s move to tie down Fernandinho, with De Bruyne to follow, is the latest step to secure the long-term futures of key players, with David Silva and Nicolas Otamendi also having penned new deals.


LOL. no way De Bruyne is on 120k and no way he is going to 200k. :lol: :lol: The narrative is truly funny. One newspaper reported De Bruyne is presently on 200K and will be going to 260k. I suspect it will even be more. He is City's best player and you think he will be paid less than Aguero or Yaya Toure?

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metalalloy wrote:
Does the SE have Gray, Mahrez or Albrighton on our team or players of their caliber?


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:17 am 
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danfo driver wrote:
bepanda wrote:
Apparently some important players like the directions their teams are going and are signing long term deals ...
Could Sanchez be making 3-times more than KDB's?
Bepanda
Fernandinho has committed his future to Manchester City – with Kevin De Bruyne the next to sign a lucrative contract extension.
Midfielder Fernandinho, who was out of contract in the summer, has signed a new two-year deal which will keep him at City util 2020.
De Bruyne, City's best player this season, will be the next to follow, with the Belgium star set to sign a new six-year deal that will see his wages leap from £120,000-a-week to £200,000-a-week.
City’s move to tie down Fernandinho, with De Bruyne to follow, is the latest step to secure the long-term futures of key players, with David Silva and Nicolas Otamendi also having penned new deals.


LOL. no way De Bruyne is on 120k and no way he is going to 200k. :lol: :lol: The narrative is truly funny. One newspaper reported De Bruyne is presently on 200K and will be going to 260k. I suspect it will even be more. He is City's best player and you think he will be paid less than Aguero or Yaya Toure?

Me my self was wondering how could this kid accept 120k when others even at belove like Ozil making more.
@ Danfo how come most clubs not falling for Ozil that some says he is the best playmaker in the game.A special player every team will wish to have?Its really shocking to me that some big clubs are not taking advantage of his situation and offer him better than Arsenal..
Hope he can stay if he leaves i prefer he leave this month we cut that wages and take the money add and buy a good player.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:30 am 
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kajifu wrote:
danfo driver wrote:
bepanda wrote:
Apparently some important players like the directions their teams are going and are signing long term deals ...
Could Sanchez be making 3-times more than KDB's?
Bepanda
Fernandinho has committed his future to Manchester City – with Kevin De Bruyne the next to sign a lucrative contract extension.
Midfielder Fernandinho, who was out of contract in the summer, has signed a new two-year deal which will keep him at City util 2020.
De Bruyne, City's best player this season, will be the next to follow, with the Belgium star set to sign a new six-year deal that will see his wages leap from £120,000-a-week to £200,000-a-week.
City’s move to tie down Fernandinho, with De Bruyne to follow, is the latest step to secure the long-term futures of key players, with David Silva and Nicolas Otamendi also having penned new deals.


LOL. no way De Bruyne is on 120k and no way he is going to 200k. :lol: :lol: The narrative is truly funny. One newspaper reported De Bruyne is presently on 200K and will be going to 260k. I suspect it will even be more. He is City's best player and you think he will be paid less than Aguero or Yaya Toure?

Me my self was wondering how could this kid accept 120k when others even at belove like Ozil making more.
@ Danfo how come most clubs not falling for Ozil that some says he is the best playmaker in the game.A special player every team will wish to have?Its really shocking to me that some big clubs are not taking advantage of his situation and offer him better than Arsenal..
Hope he can stay if he leaves i prefer he leave this month we cut that wages and take the money add and buy a good player.


Me, I no know o! Personally, I have never liked Ozil as a player and I even said so here when Arsenal was about to buy him. I said that Mourinho who is claimed to love him did not even raise a finger to buy him, for a reason. But to be fair, I dont like him as a player, so anything i say about him will be biased.

As good as he is, his "lazy" part of the game may put a lot of people off and in this day and age of "high pressing," when all coaches want their forwards to work hard, he may not have too many admirers. We will see sha.

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metalalloy wrote:
Does the SE have Gray, Mahrez or Albrighton on our team or players of their caliber?


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:23 am 
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All of you people posting all these essays are jobless..kai ...yall need to go for walks, get away from the Internet

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:38 am 
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So the Sun newspaper are ripping into Sanchez for not sticking to a gentleman’s agreement he had with Pep. Neil Aston, that hypocrite, has the gall to write about morals, principles and decency. This from a news paper and organisation that tapped a dead girl's phone.

It is funny how the cretin Ashton does not mention Pep should not have even been talking to him, never mind making an agreement, what with him being an Arsenal player in the first place. Of course, the same Ashton wrote Sanchez will snubbed Mourinho only a few days ago.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/sport/football ... ssion=true

But he talks about morals. A columnist for a paper that wrote what they did about Hillsborough talking about morals, the absolute irony and hypocrisy.

Arsenal’s role in all this forgotten. After City late bid on transfers deadline day, left Arsenal little room to sort out a replacement plus Sanchez conduct since the window closed, Arsenal have grabbed the bull by the horns.

Arsenal chief executive Ivan Gazidis started an auction by punting Sanchez around Europe’s top clubs. If they get Mikhitaryan as part of this deal, it will be a brilliant salvage operation. Mikh is a player they wanted and had an agreement with till they were priced out by ManU and ManU aware of this, offered the player to Arsenal as part of any deal. Other stories claim, Arsenal asked for Mikhitaryan.

Arsenal has done exactly what they should have, despite the negative slant trying to make it sound almost seedy by that hack called Ashton.

Arsenal have done the right thing for themselves, and so have United and Sanchez. I see nothing scandalous or controversial about any of it. So why is Sanchez being cast a villain?

Sanchez has been turned into a transfer villain beyond compare and is being held up as the ultimate South American mercenary. Why? I tell you, he is a foreigner who has done what English players do all the time but not a word from these news papers.


The hysteria the Sun and co have generated as become its own beast and irrelevant to what has actually happened or is happening.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:04 pm 
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An auction that costs 30 million and a 20+ points deficit as a consequence of a divided dressing room. Bull by the horns indeed. Sanchez has told Beloved, under no circumstances is he staying, thus the conundrum was, better with or better without. The league title is gone and top four, a long shot, the sale of Sanchez in January has nothing to do with donning skin tight leggings, a tapered, waistline blazer with padded shoulders and waving a red blanket and more to do with acceptance. The season, as far as major honours be concerned, is finished. Europa? That for which Mourinho was mocked last year by the very same faithful now buffering it's metal. The season is finished, whether Sanchez stays or goes has no impact on Arsenal and thus, he goes. Bull by the horn, really? Selling your leading goalscorer for consecutive seasons, to a rival for top four, effectively lessening the already miniscule chance of breaking in, bull by the horns? Hilarious.

Mkhitaryan comes in (Arsenal dont deal with agents) and all must hope, Manchester was simply a matter of fit and nil else. A very capable player, if he can delIver half of what his predecessor did, it helps. Good business? No, good business places one at an advantage. Good business builds a world class squad around world class talents. Good business doesn't squander the gold of one's years pursuing the chimerical blossom of Denilson, Bendtner, Walcott, Chambers et al. Good business does not acquire a plethora of monkeys for peanuts, only to spread a virulent ebola throughout one's legacy. Good business would've been two snooker balls inside a knotted sock, wrapped around the head, repeatedly, till a crack was heard, through which such nonsensical ideals, could escape from their cranial confines, running free, never to be seen again. Good business. Shelby Company Limited good business.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:24 pm 
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Coach wrote:
An auction that costs 30 million and a 20+ points deficit as a consequence of a divided dressing room. Bull by the horns indeed. Sanchez has told Beloved, under no circumstances is he staying, thus the conundrum was, better with or better without. The league title is gone and top four, a long shot, the sale of Sanchez in January has nothing to do with donning skin tight leggings, a tapered, waistline blazer with padded shoulders and waving a red blanket and more to do with acceptance. The season, as far as major honours be concerned, is finished. Europa? That for which Mourinho was mocked last year by the very same faithful now buffering it's metal. The season is finished, whether Sanchez stays or goes has no impact on Arsenal and thus, he goes. Bull by the horn, really? Selling your leading goalscorer for consecutive seasons, to a rival for top four, effectively lessening the already miniscule chance of breaking in, bull by the horns? Hilarious.

Mkhitaryan comes in (Arsenal dont deal with agents) and all must hope, Manchester was simply a matter of fit and nil else. A very capable player, if he can delIver half of what his predecessor did, it helps. Good business? No, good business places one at an advantage. Good business builds a world class squad around world class talents. Good business doesn't squander the gold of one's years pursuing the chimerical blossom of Denilson, Bendtner, Walcott, Chambers et al. Good business does not acquire a plethora of monkeys for peanuts, only to spread a virulent ebola throughout one's legacy. Good business would've been two snooker balls inside a knotted sock, wrapped around the head, repeatedly, till a crack was heard, through which such nonsensical ideals, could escape from their cranial confines, running free, never to be seen again. Good business. Shelby Company Limited good business.



take a bow, (my)Son.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:54 pm 
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^The fluency with which absolute poppycock is pedalled, like Chris Hoy might one add, never ceases to amaze. Balls firmly in the closed hand of another, all in plain sight of an audience, to whom it's told, the ensuing falsetto is not a consequence of a crushed epididymis but rather an ode to Adele Adkins. No this is not as Beloved foresaw nor intended, suffice to say, no bull has been grabbed by its horn, the matador, run roughshod and stampeded, is rolling in the deep, most of which is the produce of yesterday's graze!

Beloved is trying to make the best of a bullsh*t situation. Why must the chorus be of lies and falsifications? There is a desperation on both sides of the deal, United have seen the truth in Lukaku and come to realise that Zlatan's lion that doesn't heal the same as mere mortals, is entirely mind forged and if at all real, has been cleaved of d#$%, balls and any vestige to its kingly standing. They need Sanchez. Arsenal are desperately trying to save face, a face that beams bright red in the marketplace and would see a Manuel Lanzini go from 15 to 50 million. Mkhitaryan is not merely because United want to get rid and he's a decent player, but because those smart men, bastions of good business know, cash serves them no good.

The bull was never grabbed by the horns, Herring Ward (Orthopaedics), Thomas splint, bed in a Trendellenburg tilt to have gravity hold the shattered spine together. More plaster of Paris than a Band Aid warehouse on the fourth floor of the Eiffel Tower. Xray reminiscent of wedding day confetti. Bull by the horns indeed.

It's a sh*t situation, plain and simple, one none at that great establishment would wish on Tottenham even, but alas, here it us. The storm must be ridden, but first the storm must be seen as just that. A f*cking storm. The sooner the window closes the better.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:37 pm 
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:40 pm 
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4-2-3-1 from AW today.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:41 pm 
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Who go open game thread today?
Good luck to the boys ,


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:51 pm 
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Fact remains we're in late Jan and AW has not clue or vision on his ideal starting 11. Week after week it's a mishmash 11, AW just hoping talent alone enough to secure a victory.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:53 pm 
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Tunisian Gooner wrote:
Fact remains we're in late Jan and AW has not clue or vision on his ideal starting 11. Week after week it's a mishmash 11, AW just hoping talent alone enough to secure a victory.



:D :D :D :D

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:15 pm 
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Finally back to a back four. Three was a blast but in truth, t'is evident the execution was poor, at times, abysmal. Back to that well known and well up.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 6:42 pm 
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We just need to keep Ozil. Whatever it takes.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 6:51 pm 
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Tunisian Gooner wrote:
4-2-3-1 from AW today.




I would not mind this team sans Xhacrap and Lacazette

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 6:54 pm 
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anikulapo wrote:
Tunisian Gooner wrote:
4-2-3-1 from AW today.




I would not mind this team sans Xhacrap and Lacazette

Uncle who you go start over this two?


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