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 Post subject: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:46 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 4:43 pm
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http://allafrica.com/stories/201806090072.html
Super Eagles.

By Segun Odegbami

At last, the 2018 World Cup will start in about seven days from now.
All the 32 countries in the championship are in a race to play as many friendly matches as possible against opposition that looks like those they will be playing against when 'hostilities' begin on June 14.
These matches are to gauge and hone the teams, discover the best in-form players, work out tactics, unearth 'hidden' gems, build up confidence, and generally get the team to 'blend' and start to play cohesively as a unit, beyond the product of the usual quick-assembly of players a day or two before most of the qualifying matches that, often, never gives managers ample time to get the players to play with depth and discipline in tandem with his vision for their ultimate team.
These past two weeks have made national teams either more confident and raring to go to Russia, or very jittery and unsure of themselves as in the case of the Super Eagles following their spate of uninspiring performances.
The last three friendly matches played by the Eagles, once touted by Nigerians as the team to beat in Group D, have ended in losses that have left their supporters with more questions than answers.
This could not be the same Eagles that sailed through the qualifying rounds of the World Cup without a dent.


This could not be the team that deservedly trounced Argentina (without Lionel Messi though) only a few months ago.
This could not be the team that taught Serbia a lesson on how to win matches without playing well.
So confident did Nigerians become that last week, for the first time in their history, replica shirts of the national team sold like wild fire in the international market.
Three million Nike shirts were reportedly sold out within hours of release into the London market, with long winding queues of shoppers around entire blocks waiting on the sidewalks to buy them throughout that day.
That was an unprecedented scene, reflective of the status and expectations of fans of the Super Eagles.
Of course, amongst the smaller audience of international football analysts there have never been any lavish expectations.
Nigeria was never considered anywhere near favourites to win the most coveted football trophy in the world. Teams just do not wake up and think they can win the World Cup.
Statistically, only a few teams have ever won the prestigious trophy since inception in 1938. Of those teams only even fewer still have managed to win it two times or more.

Some teams have mastered the winning formula and applied it more than others to dominate the teams at the top during every World Cup.
Nothing beats the psychology of a previous winner. Outside of these, plus the teams that won using advantage of being hosts, teams just do not wake up and win the World Cup.
But trust the most passionate followers of football in the world, Nigerian supporters would always dream that their beloved Super Eagles, with prayers and fasting, would do the unthinkable, and win it.
Nigerians are unrepentantly optimistic. Even when they presented the weakest assemblies of players in Korea/Japan 2002 and South Africa 2010, even I recklessly joined in the wishful thinking.
You see, Nigerians have a good reason to hope for a miracle. It has happened to them at all other levels except at the World Cup.
It happened to them in 1985 in China with the Under-16 national team.
It happened during the 'Damman Miracle' in Saudi Arabia in 1989 at the Under-20 level when they got very close but did not win.

In 1996 it happened in Atlanta when they won the Olympic Gold at Under-23!
The belief is that the World Cup 'miracle' is close by.
In 1994, during their first appearance at the World Cup in America, they were rated after the championship as the most entertaining team with their unadulterated free-flowing attacking style of football, and fifth ranked in the world for their great run of victories that year.
Since 1996, the seed of the possibility of winning the World Cup was firmly planted in every Nigerian player and indeed, in every Nigerian.
That year they overcame the fear of impossibility. They became reckless in their optimism every time they qualify for the World Cup.
That's the feeling still running in the veins of the players and their supporters as Russia 2018 approaches.
Unfortunately, these past two weeks have been a psychological dampener.
With how the team effortlessly lost their last two friendlies, in particular, the spirit of high expectations has been dampened, and morale is low and the songs of victory are now only in whimpers.
My rating of the Super Eagles
The Super Eagles have a 'registered' playing trade mark. Nigerian players are generally very physical, athletic and expressive on the ball. These make attacking football at a fast pace their forte and is very attractive when playing down the flanks at speed and with power.
General team play organization and discipline are often what lets them down at the highest level.
Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.
They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.
This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

The team has been more European than any national team in our history.
For the first time the Super Eagles have more players that never played domestic football in Nigeria and are not honed in the typical Nigerian style of football in the Super Eagles.
These are not Nigerian players in the true sense of the word. They are foreign-Nigerian players, limited in the Nigerian style and, yet, not the best in their European foundation.
What we now have is a new kind of Super Eagles made up of a mix of good players (but average by European standards) and good home-grown players that are not exceptional, in a combination that has been playing well as a 'team'.
That's how they overcame their African challengers during qualifiers. But that's what makes this present team suspiciously 'weak', and potential sitting ducks when the World Cup proper begins.

Unless the World Cup produces them when the competition starts, the present team lacks the outstanding individual player in the mold Muda Lawal, Haruna Ilerika, Finidi George, Kanu Nwankwo, Jay Jay Okocha and so on - very skillful and extravagantly expressive on the ball, who could turn defeat into victory with one moment, movement or pass of magic.
Bell

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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:25 am 
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A truthful statement.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:02 am 
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The Nigerian based player is too craptastic for the wc.

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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:37 am 
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With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

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Ecclesiastes 1:18: For in much wisdom is much grief and he that increases knowledge increases sorrow.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 5:43 am 
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Bell wrote:
http://allafrica.com/stories/201806090072.html
Super Eagles.

By Segun Odegbami

At last, the 2018 World Cup will start in about seven days from now.
All the 32 countries in the championship are in a race to play as many friendly matches as possible against opposition that looks like those they will be playing against when 'hostilities' begin on June 14.
These matches are to gauge and hone the teams, discover the best in-form players, work out tactics, unearth 'hidden' gems, build up confidence, and generally get the team to 'blend' and start to play cohesively as a unit, beyond the product of the usual quick-assembly of players a day or two before most of the qualifying matches that, often, never gives managers ample time to get the players to play with depth and discipline in tandem with his vision for their ultimate team.
These past two weeks have made national teams either more confident and raring to go to Russia, or very jittery and unsure of themselves as in the case of the Super Eagles following their spate of uninspiring performances.
The last three friendly matches played by the Eagles, once touted by Nigerians as the team to beat in Group D, have ended in losses that have left their supporters with more questions than answers.
This could not be the same Eagles that sailed through the qualifying rounds of the World Cup without a dent.


This could not be the team that deservedly trounced Argentina (without Lionel Messi though) only a few months ago.
This could not be the team that taught Serbia a lesson on how to win matches without playing well.
So confident did Nigerians become that last week, for the first time in their history, replica shirts of the national team sold like wild fire in the international market.
Three million Nike shirts were reportedly sold out within hours of release into the London market, with long winding queues of shoppers around entire blocks waiting on the sidewalks to buy them throughout that day.
That was an unprecedented scene, reflective of the status and expectations of fans of the Super Eagles.
Of course, amongst the smaller audience of international football analysts there have never been any lavish expectations.
Nigeria was never considered anywhere near favourites to win the most coveted football trophy in the world. Teams just do not wake up and think they can win the World Cup.
Statistically, only a few teams have ever won the prestigious trophy since inception in 1938. Of those teams only even fewer still have managed to win it two times or more.

Some teams have mastered the winning formula and applied it more than others to dominate the teams at the top during every World Cup.
Nothing beats the psychology of a previous winner. Outside of these, plus the teams that won using advantage of being hosts, teams just do not wake up and win the World Cup.
But trust the most passionate followers of football in the world, Nigerian supporters would always dream that their beloved Super Eagles, with prayers and fasting, would do the unthinkable, and win it.
Nigerians are unrepentantly optimistic. Even when they presented the weakest assemblies of players in Korea/Japan 2002 and South Africa 2010, even I recklessly joined in the wishful thinking.
You see, Nigerians have a good reason to hope for a miracle. It has happened to them at all other levels except at the World Cup.
It happened to them in 1985 in China with the Under-16 national team.
It happened during the 'Damman Miracle' in Saudi Arabia in 1989 at the Under-20 level when they got very close but did not win.

In 1996 it happened in Atlanta when they won the Olympic Gold at Under-23!
The belief is that the World Cup 'miracle' is close by.
In 1994, during their first appearance at the World Cup in America, they were rated after the championship as the most entertaining team with their unadulterated free-flowing attacking style of football, and fifth ranked in the world for their great run of victories that year.
Since 1996, the seed of the possibility of winning the World Cup was firmly planted in every Nigerian player and indeed, in every Nigerian.
That year they overcame the fear of impossibility. They became reckless in their optimism every time they qualify for the World Cup.
That's the feeling still running in the veins of the players and their supporters as Russia 2018 approaches.
Unfortunately, these past two weeks have been a psychological dampener.
With how the team effortlessly lost their last two friendlies, in particular, the spirit of high expectations has been dampened, and morale is low and the songs of victory are now only in whimpers.
My rating of the Super Eagles
The Super Eagles have a 'registered' playing trade mark. Nigerian players are generally very physical, athletic and expressive on the ball. These make attacking football at a fast pace their forte and is very attractive when playing down the flanks at speed and with power.
General team play organization and discipline are often what lets them down at the highest level.
Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.
They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.
This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

The team has been more European than any national team in our history.
For the first time the Super Eagles have more players that never played domestic football in Nigeria and are not honed in the typical Nigerian style of football in the Super Eagles.
These are not Nigerian players in the true sense of the word. They are foreign-Nigerian players, limited in the Nigerian style and, yet, not the best in their European foundation.
What we now have is a new kind of Super Eagles made up of a mix of good players (but average by European standards) and good home-grown players that are not exceptional, in a combination that has been playing well as a 'team'.
That's how they overcame their African challengers during qualifiers. But that's what makes this present team suspiciously 'weak', and potential sitting ducks when the World Cup proper begins.
Unless the World Cup produces them when the competition starts, the present team lacks the outstanding individual player in the mold Muda Lawal, Haruna Ilerika, Finidi George, Kanu Nwankwo, Jay Jay Okocha and so on - very skillful and extravagantly expressive on the ball, who could turn defeat into victory with one moment, movement or pass of magic.
Bell


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:54 am 
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Great player, good TV presenter, and he is doing amazing things for football (combined with Academics) in his academy on the Sagamu Abeokuta expressway.

I used to go to his (soccer) Video club in Yaba/Jibowu back in the day (circa 1990).

Having said all that, he is a crappy football analyst.

He wrote that Nigeria stood no chance from our qualifying group and that we and Zambia were just there to make up the numbers. I countered that sentiment on here. He was obviously wrong.

He is wrong again. A lot of the 'foreign born' Naija players play with the 'naija' swag. That is what they grew up knowing & what their dads showed then & it cannot be completely coached out. You saw it in a Maurice Edu for the States or even in a Sone Aluko. That may be why an Alex Iwobi seems to play better for the Eagles. If he is talking about physicality, that is genetic, so being born abroad does not change that.

His point is as silly as suggesting that if you put 10,000 'foreign born' Nigerian fans in wembley, they would not know how to cheer, boo, chant & support the Nigerian way, because they have not done so in Nigerian stadia.

Now you know how watery his point is!


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:04 am 
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Preach Odegbami preach!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:08 am 
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Rose tinted specs, rose tinted specs. I have watched Naija football avidly from the late 70's and early 80's so i just about caught the halycn days Uncle Segun waxes lyrical about. Those days 4 2 4 reigned and because we produced wingers by the bucket load are play was pacy, skillful and of course robust. Naija played against an african continent which tended to play similar football but didnt possess the quality of wing play that we enjoyed. Only the North African teams seemed to show any interest in the midfield and they were easily muscled off the ball by whatever dudes we told to stand in the middle (midfield) or man and ball if they got to close to our goal (defence) When it worked it was exciting, quick and reasonably successful. But reasonably was a word i use thoughtfully because anybody who watched football then would remember mind numbingly dull games where the ball was just hoofed from one end of the field to the other with the wingers doing nothing of game winning note and defenders just booting the ball as far away from the goal as they could possible launch it.

From the mid 80's to the mid 90's our football wasnt that great to watch and the term Midfield collapse was an expression that filled newspaper reports. While the rest of the world had taken an interest especially the North Africans in dominating the ball by keeping it and playing thru the middle, we still hit hopefully bombs from front to back fullback to wing. Our muscularity which rescued the team time and time again was negated by the simple expedience of flopping to the floor and looking at the ref (all North African teams still resort to this simple but obvious means to prevent football from becoming brute ball) we STRUGGLED! We simply didnt produce decent midfielders. Either our midfielders were show ponies who wowed the audience with a flick and turn and then disappeared for lenghty periods or they were wanabe attackers or drafted defenders who merely obstacles to be manuovered around with any team with a bit of midfield nous. It was bad and for me was summed up in the 1982 WCQ with the Algerians coming to Lagos and securing world cup qualification with that infamous 2-0 win.

Things have really changed since then. Now we produce midfielders and real midfielders by the bucketload. Once upon a time we went to the world cup with only Adepoju, Oliha, and Eguavoen as bonafide midfielders, thus when Sunday Oliseh popped up and Jay Jay Okocha was allowed to play with freedom, we felt spoilt for midfield choice and our play really blossomed. No longer did we just launch from back to front ceding possession just as soon as we got it because we were trying to replicate "Matatamatical has de ball on the run" (our commentators loved cliches God bless the late great Ernest Okonkwo) now we actually built play with more measure. The deadly wing play was still there but it wasnt plan A, B,C.......Z.

We dont rely on wingplay which invariably leads to kick and rush and we have not relied on that in over a decade maybe two. If you want the old way Uncle Segun root for Senegal. We are and have been for a long time a team which plays possession football to sometimes great effect sometimes not. The strength of this team is in the midfield and not just midfield but all round midfield players. That is the teams strength. I dont know what is happening on the domestic scene but because wing play is seen as a luxury in todays dont lose first mentality, you do not see wingers unless they are exceptional starting games in Europe and when i say wingers i mean of the Odegbami brand who were given license to have a fanta and meat pie if the ball was not lain adoringly at their feet. Vic Mo when HE PLAYS FOR NAIJA (emphasis Naija cos he dare not try that stuff in the club game) is the nearest to the dearly beloved mythical winger. Naija has changed a lot so has our football.

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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:08 am 
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Rose tinted specs, rose tinted specs. I have watched Naija football avidly from the late 70's and early 80's so i just about caught the halycn days Uncle Segun waxes lyrical about. Those days 4 2 4 reigned and because we produced wingers by the bucket load are play was pacy, skillful and of course robust. Naija played against an african continent which tended to play similar football but didnt possess the quality of wing play that we enjoyed. Only the North African teams seemed to show any interest in the midfield and they were easily muscled off the ball by whatever dudes we told to stand in the middle (midfield) or man and ball if they got to close to our goal (defence) When it worked it was exciting, quick and reasonably successful. But reasonably was a word i use thoughtfully because anybody who watched football then would remember mind numbingly dull games where the ball was just hoofed from one end of the field to the other with the wingers doing nothing of game winning note and defenders just booting the ball as far away from the goal as they could possible launch it.

From the mid 80's to the mid 90's our football wasnt that great to watch and the term Midfield collapse was an expression that filled newspaper reports. While the rest of the world had taken an interest especially the North Africans in dominating the ball by keeping it and playing thru the middle, we still hit hopefully bombs from front to back fullback to wing. Our muscularity which rescued the team time and time again was negated by the simple expedience of flopping to the floor and looking at the ref (all North African teams still resort to this simple but obvious means to prevent football from becoming brute ball) we STRUGGLED! We simply didnt produce decent midfielders. Either our midfielders were show ponies who wowed the audience with a flick and turn and then disappeared for lenghty periods or they were wanabe attackers or drafted defenders who merely obstacles to be manuovered around with any team with a bit of midfield nous. It was bad and for me was summed up in the 1982 WCQ with the Algerians coming to Lagos and securing world cup qualification with that infamous 2-0 win.

Things have really changed since then. Now we produce midfielders and real midfielders by the bucketload. Once upon a time we went to the world cup with only Adepoju, Oliha, and Eguavoen as bonafide midfielders, thus when Sunday Oliseh popped up and Jay Jay Okocha was allowed to play with freedom, we felt spoilt for midfield choice and our play really blossomed. No longer did we just launch from back to front ceding possession just as soon as we got it because we were trying to replicate "Matatamatical has de ball on the run" (our commentators loved cliches God bless the late great Ernest Okonkwo) now we actually built play with more measure. The deadly wing play was still there but it wasnt plan A, B,C.......Z.

We dont rely on wingplay which invariably leads to kick and rush and we have not relied on that in over a decade maybe two. If you want the old way Uncle Segun root for Senegal. We are and have been for a long time a team which plays possession football to sometimes great effect sometimes not. The strength of this team is in the midfield and not just midfield but all round midfield players. That is the teams strength. I dont know what is happening on the domestic scene but because wing play is seen as a luxury in todays dont lose first mentality, you do not see wingers unless they are exceptional starting games in Europe and when i say wingers i mean of the Odegbami brand who were given license to have a fanta and meat pie if the ball was not lain adoringly at their feet. Vic Mo when HE PLAYS FOR NAIJA (emphasis Naija cos he dare not try that stuff in the club game) is the nearest to the dearly beloved mythical winger. Naija has changed a lot so has our football.

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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:38 am 
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pasamu wrote:
Rose tinted specs, rose tinted specs. I have watched Naija football avidly from the late 70's and early 80's so i just about caught the halycn days Uncle Segun waxes lyrical about. Those days 4 2 4 reigned and because we produced wingers by the bucket load are play was pacy, skillful and of course robust. Naija played against an african continent which tended to play similar football but didnt possess the quality of wing play that we enjoyed. Only the North African teams seemed to show any interest in the midfield and they were easily muscled off the ball by whatever dudes we told to stand in the middle (midfield) or man and ball if they got to close to our goal (defence) When it worked it was exciting, quick and reasonably successful. But reasonably was a word i use thoughtfully because anybody who watched football then would remember mind numbingly dull games where the ball was just hoofed from one end of the field to the other with the wingers doing nothing of game winning note and defenders just booting the ball as far away from the goal as they could possible launch it.

From the mid 80's to the mid 90's our football wasnt that great to watch and the term Midfield collapse was an expression that filled newspaper reports. While the rest of the world had taken an interest especially the North Africans in dominating the ball by keeping it and playing thru the middle, we still hit hopefully bombs from front to back fullback to wing. Our muscularity which rescued the team time and time again was negated by the simple expedience of flopping to the floor and looking at the ref (all North African teams still resort to this simple but obvious means to prevent football from becoming brute ball) we STRUGGLED! We simply didnt produce decent midfielders. Either our midfielders were show ponies who wowed the audience with a flick and turn and then disappeared for lenghty periods or they were wanabe attackers or drafted defenders who merely obstacles to be manuovered around with any team with a bit of midfield nous. It was bad and for me was summed up in the 1982 WCQ with the Algerians coming to Lagos and securing world cup qualification with that infamous 2-0 win.

Things have really changed since then. Now we produce midfielders and real midfielders by the bucketload. Once upon a time we went to the world cup with only Adepoju, Oliha, and Eguavoen as bonafide midfielders, thus when Sunday Oliseh popped up and Jay Jay Okocha was allowed to play with freedom, we felt spoilt for midfield choice and our play really blossomed. No longer did we just launch from back to front ceding possession just as soon as we got it because we were trying to replicate "Matatamatical has de ball on the run" (our commentators loved cliches God bless the late great Ernest Okonkwo) now we actually built play with more measure. The deadly wing play was still there but it wasnt plan A, B,C.......Z.

We dont rely on wingplay which invariably leads to kick and rush and we have not relied on that in over a decade maybe two. If you want the old way Uncle Segun root for Senegal. We are and have been for a long time a team which plays possession football to sometimes great effect sometimes not. The strength of this team is in the midfield and not just midfield but all round midfield players. That is the teams strength. I dont know what is happening on the domestic scene but because wing play is seen as a luxury in todays dont lose first mentality, you do not see wingers unless they are exceptional starting games in Europe and when i say wingers i mean of the Odegbami brand who were given license to have a fanta and meat pie if the ball was not lain adoringly at their feet. Vic Mo when HE PLAYS FOR NAIJA (emphasis Naija cos he dare not try that stuff in the club game) is the nearest to the dearly beloved mythical winger. Naija has changed a lot so has our football.


Very well said :clap:

The whole 'foreign' Nigerian thing he was getting at does not make much sense to me. We have a decent number flair players if we decide to turn up the heat... the majority of the people he refers to of not having played locally and not having the Nigerian style are probably our back 4 and at those positions you need more discipline than flair (these guys also suffer the negative traits of some of our "Nigerian" ways with their lack attentiveness in the box to the opposition at set peices which has plagued us for generations) .. Going forward, we have two gents in Moses and Iwobi who did not play in our locals leagues but have the skills and play of the typical under bridge boys when they decide to turn it on. So in many ways, both positively and negatively, this is a very Nigerian team, plain and simple.. Issue is what part of the Nigerian-'ness" are they bringing to the table on the day.

The 23 man list taken to the World Cup is not a bad combo of players (barring one or two) and we should have a solid first 11 with 6 decent subs (This was not case at the last tournament).. the issue people seem to have, is just those friendly game losses and the fact that in some of those matches, some players did not pull their weight (the England game where the first half was the most shameful 45mins most of us can remember in recent years). We must however put a few things into perspective.. formation changes and coach instructions for one, can factor positively or negatively in every game(England match- the two different halves) and a coach getting it wrong can ruin everything even with decent players on the pitch; avoiding injuries and not going past gear 2 (player effort) because everyone wants to be in the starting 11 at the tournament and not be a glorified bench warmer/World Cup tourist (this is is a catch 22 for those players who haven't really played themselves into the heart of the coach as they will be further down the line with their average/below average displays).

Overall I think the squad is decent... we never really felt we had super, exceptional players per se like some of our old players but we have seen more team play in the last 2 years than in the last decade of Nigerian senior football.. they can def pull off surprises with or without wing play if they play as a unit and are more attentive (those set piece goals we conceded are usually from a lack of effort with seems to stem from some sort of poor attention span). What we need to do is temper our expectations and hopefully be pleasantly surprised at the end of it all but to outrightly say this "Team" does not embody the Nigerian spirit/style is something I can't wholly agree with.

I am hoping the boys put on a very decent shift as they most likely have more motivation (Personal or Patriotic) come tournament proper and that they remain team orientated in their play than our previous squads to the World Cup.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:51 am 
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Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 1:40 pm 
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uglyoneiamagain wrote:
pasamu wrote:
Rose tinted specs, rose tinted specs. I have watched Naija football avidly from the late 70's and early 80's so i just about caught the halycn days Uncle Segun waxes lyrical about. Those days 4 2 4 reigned and because we produced wingers by the bucket load are play was pacy, skillful and of course robust. Naija played against an african continent which tended to play similar football but didnt possess the quality of wing play that we enjoyed. Only the North African teams seemed to show any interest in the midfield and they were easily muscled off the ball by whatever dudes we told to stand in the middle (midfield) or man and ball if they got to close to our goal (defence) When it worked it was exciting, quick and reasonably successful. But reasonably was a word i use thoughtfully because anybody who watched football then would remember mind numbingly dull games where the ball was just hoofed from one end of the field to the other with the wingers doing nothing of game winning note and defenders just booting the ball as far away from the goal as they could possible launch it.

From the mid 80's to the mid 90's our football wasnt that great to watch and the term Midfield collapse was an expression that filled newspaper reports. While the rest of the world had taken an interest especially the North Africans in dominating the ball by keeping it and playing thru the middle, we still hit hopefully bombs from front to back fullback to wing. Our muscularity which rescued the team time and time again was negated by the simple expedience of flopping to the floor and looking at the ref (all North African teams still resort to this simple but obvious means to prevent football from becoming brute ball) we STRUGGLED! We simply didnt produce decent midfielders. Either our midfielders were show ponies who wowed the audience with a flick and turn and then disappeared for lenghty periods or they were wanabe attackers or drafted defenders who merely obstacles to be manuovered around with any team with a bit of midfield nous. It was bad and for me was summed up in the 1982 WCQ with the Algerians coming to Lagos and securing world cup qualification with that infamous 2-0 win.

Things have really changed since then. Now we produce midfielders and real midfielders by the bucketload. Once upon a time we went to the world cup with only Adepoju, Oliha, and Eguavoen as bonafide midfielders, thus when Sunday Oliseh popped up and Jay Jay Okocha was allowed to play with freedom, we felt spoilt for midfield choice and our play really blossomed. No longer did we just launch from back to front ceding possession just as soon as we got it because we were trying to replicate "Matatamatical has de ball on the run" (our commentators loved cliches God bless the late great Ernest Okonkwo) now we actually built play with more measure. The deadly wing play was still there but it wasnt plan A, B,C.......Z.

We dont rely on wingplay which invariably leads to kick and rush and we have not relied on that in over a decade maybe two. If you want the old way Uncle Segun root for Senegal. We are and have been for a long time a team which plays possession football to sometimes great effect sometimes not. The strength of this team is in the midfield and not just midfield but all round midfield players. That is the teams strength. I dont know what is happening on the domestic scene but because wing play is seen as a luxury in todays dont lose first mentality, you do not see wingers unless they are exceptional starting games in Europe and when i say wingers i mean of the Odegbami brand who were given license to have a fanta and meat pie if the ball was not lain adoringly at their feet. Vic Mo when HE PLAYS FOR NAIJA (emphasis Naija cos he dare not try that stuff in the club game) is the nearest to the dearly beloved mythical winger. Naija has changed a lot so has our football.


Very well said :clap:

The whole 'foreign' Nigerian thing he was getting at does not make much sense to me. We have a decent number flair players if we decide to turn up the heat... the majority of the people he refers to of not having played locally and not having the Nigerian style are probably our back 4 and at those positions you need more discipline than flair (these guys also suffer the negative traits of some of our "Nigerian" ways with their lack attentiveness in the box to the opposition at set peices which has plagued us for generations) .. Going forward, we have two gents in Moses and Iwobi who did not play in our locals leagues but have the skills and play of the typical under bridge boys when they decide to turn it on. So in many ways, both positively and negatively, this is a very Nigerian team, plain and simple.. Issue is what part of the Nigerian-'ness" are they bringing to the table on the day.

The 23 man list taken to the World Cup is not a bad combo of players (barring one or two) and we should have a solid first 11 with 6 decent subs (This was not case at the last tournament).. the issue people seem to have, is just those friendly game losses and the fact that in some of those matches, some players did not pull their weight (the England game where the first half was the most shameful 45mins most of us can remember in recent years). We must however put a few things into perspective.. formation changes and coach instructions for one, can factor positively or negatively in every game(England match- the two different halves) and a coach getting it wrong can ruin everything even with decent players on the pitch; avoiding injuries and not going past gear 2 (player effort) because everyone wants to be in the starting 11 at the tournament and not be a glorified bench warmer/World Cup tourist (this is is a catch 22 for those players who haven't really played themselves into the heart of the coach as they will be further down the line with their average/below average displays).

Overall I think the squad is decent... we never really felt we had super, exceptional players per se like some of our old players but we have seen more team play in the last 2 years than in the last decade of Nigerian senior football.. they can def pull off surprises with or without wing play if they play as a unit and are more attentive (those set piece goals we conceded are usually from a lack of effort with seems to stem from some sort of poor attention span). What we need to do is temper our expectations and hopefully be pleasantly surprised at the end of it all but to outrightly say this "Team" does not embody the Nigerian spirit/style is something I can't wholly agree with.

I am hoping the boys put on a very decent shift as they most likely have more motivation (Personal or Patriotic) come tournament proper and that they remain team orientated in their play than our previous squads to the World Cup.


The two both of yous have made all the counter-arguments. A lot of these so-called foreign-born Naijarians grew up playing with the Naijarian flair until it is coached out of them. They are also as rugged as the next Naijarian.

The fact of the matter is that most countries dominating the African scene leverage heavily on the foreign-based and foreign-born players.

Isn't it funny to note that during Uncle Sege's era they couldn't qualify out of Africa for the World Cup. Won one solitary AFCON. It took the influx of foreign based players into the National team led by Stephen Keshi for them to finally dominate African competition?

The sad reality today is that the Naijarian league is not what it used to be.

On another note, I know most people here and in Naijaria don't rate the MLS but we should look at MLS for some professionally trained footballers. Even think about getting a partnership with NCAA/MLS especially in the goalkeeping department.

_________________
I pledge to Nigeria my country
To be faithful, loyal and honest
To serve Nigeria with all my strength
To defend her unity and uphold her honor and glory
So help me God.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:55 pm 
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Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:



This is what he is saying; note the underlined esp:

Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.

They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.


This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

_________________
Image
Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:00 pm 
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Cellular wrote:
uglyoneiamagain wrote:
pasamu wrote:
Rose tinted specs, rose tinted specs. I have watched Naija football avidly from the late 70's and early 80's so i just about caught the halycn days Uncle Segun waxes lyrical about. Those days 4 2 4 reigned and because we produced wingers by the bucket load are play was pacy, skillful and of course robust. Naija played against an african continent which tended to play similar football but didnt possess the quality of wing play that we enjoyed. Only the North African teams seemed to show any interest in the midfield and they were easily muscled off the ball by whatever dudes we told to stand in the middle (midfield) or man and ball if they got to close to our goal (defence) When it worked it was exciting, quick and reasonably successful. But reasonably was a word i use thoughtfully because anybody who watched football then would remember mind numbingly dull games where the ball was just hoofed from one end of the field to the other with the wingers doing nothing of game winning note and defenders just booting the ball as far away from the goal as they could possible launch it.

From the mid 80's to the mid 90's our football wasnt that great to watch and the term Midfield collapse was an expression that filled newspaper reports. While the rest of the world had taken an interest especially the North Africans in dominating the ball by keeping it and playing thru the middle, we still hit hopefully bombs from front to back fullback to wing. Our muscularity which rescued the team time and time again was negated by the simple expedience of flopping to the floor and looking at the ref (all North African teams still resort to this simple but obvious means to prevent football from becoming brute ball) we STRUGGLED! We simply didnt produce decent midfielders. Either our midfielders were show ponies who wowed the audience with a flick and turn and then disappeared for lenghty periods or they were wanabe attackers or drafted defenders who merely obstacles to be manuovered around with any team with a bit of midfield nous. It was bad and for me was summed up in the 1982 WCQ with the Algerians coming to Lagos and securing world cup qualification with that infamous 2-0 win.

Things have really changed since then. Now we produce midfielders and real midfielders by the bucketload. Once upon a time we went to the world cup with only Adepoju, Oliha, and Eguavoen as bonafide midfielders, thus when Sunday Oliseh popped up and Jay Jay Okocha was allowed to play with freedom, we felt spoilt for midfield choice and our play really blossomed. No longer did we just launch from back to front ceding possession just as soon as we got it because we were trying to replicate "Matatamatical has de ball on the run" (our commentators loved cliches God bless the late great Ernest Okonkwo) now we actually built play with more measure. The deadly wing play was still there but it wasnt plan A, B,C.......Z.

We dont rely on wingplay which invariably leads to kick and rush and we have not relied on that in over a decade maybe two. If you want the old way Uncle Segun root for Senegal. We are and have been for a long time a team which plays possession football to sometimes great effect sometimes not. The strength of this team is in the midfield and not just midfield but all round midfield players. That is the teams strength. I dont know what is happening on the domestic scene but because wing play is seen as a luxury in todays dont lose first mentality, you do not see wingers unless they are exceptional starting games in Europe and when i say wingers i mean of the Odegbami brand who were given license to have a fanta and meat pie if the ball was not lain adoringly at their feet. Vic Mo when HE PLAYS FOR NAIJA (emphasis Naija cos he dare not try that stuff in the club game) is the nearest to the dearly beloved mythical winger. Naija has changed a lot so has our football.


Very well said :clap:

The whole 'foreign' Nigerian thing he was getting at does not make much sense to me. We have a decent number flair players if we decide to turn up the heat... the majority of the people he refers to of not having played locally and not having the Nigerian style are probably our back 4 and at those positions you need more discipline than flair (these guys also suffer the negative traits of some of our "Nigerian" ways with their lack attentiveness in the box to the opposition at set peices which has plagued us for generations) .. Going forward, we have two gents in Moses and Iwobi who did not play in our locals leagues but have the skills and play of the typical under bridge boys when they decide to turn it on. So in many ways, both positively and negatively, this is a very Nigerian team, plain and simple.. Issue is what part of the Nigerian-'ness" are they bringing to the table on the day.

The 23 man list taken to the World Cup is not a bad combo of players (barring one or two) and we should have a solid first 11 with 6 decent subs (This was not case at the last tournament).. the issue people seem to have, is just those friendly game losses and the fact that in some of those matches, some players did not pull their weight (the England game where the first half was the most shameful 45mins most of us can remember in recent years). We must however put a few things into perspective.. formation changes and coach instructions for one, can factor positively or negatively in every game(England match- the two different halves) and a coach getting it wrong can ruin everything even with decent players on the pitch; avoiding injuries and not going past gear 2 (player effort) because everyone wants to be in the starting 11 at the tournament and not be a glorified bench warmer/World Cup tourist (this is is a catch 22 for those players who haven't really played themselves into the heart of the coach as they will be further down the line with their average/below average displays).

Overall I think the squad is decent... we never really felt we had super, exceptional players per se like some of our old players but we have seen more team play in the last 2 years than in the last decade of Nigerian senior football.. they can def pull off surprises with or without wing play if they play as a unit and are more attentive (those set piece goals we conceded are usually from a lack of effort with seems to stem from some sort of poor attention span). What we need to do is temper our expectations and hopefully be pleasantly surprised at the end of it all but to outrightly say this "Team" does not embody the Nigerian spirit/style is something I can't wholly agree with.

I am hoping the boys put on a very decent shift as they most likely have more motivation (Personal or Patriotic) come tournament proper and that they remain team orientated in their play than our previous squads to the World Cup.


The two both of yous have made all the counter-arguments. A lot of these so-called foreign-born Naijarians grew up playing with the Naijarian flair until it is coached out of them. They are also as rugged as the next Naijarian.

The fact of the matter is that most countries dominating the African scene leverage heavily on the foreign-based and foreign-born players.

Isn't it funny to note that during Uncle Sege's era they couldn't qualify out of Africa for the World Cup. Won one solitary AFCON. It took the influx of foreign based players into the National team led by Stephen Keshi for them to finally dominate African competition?

Its actually SO's main point, and is anything but ironic. The ability to better harness our individual qualities under Westerhof and Bonfere, coincides with the Keshi era you refer to.

The sad reality today is that the Naijarian league is not what it used to be.

On another note, I know most people here and in Naijaria don't rate the MLS but we should look at MLS for some professionally trained footballers. Even think about getting a partnership with NCAA/MLS especially in the goalkeeping department.

_________________
Image
Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:26 pm 
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txj wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


This is what he is saying; note the underlined esp:

Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.

They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.


This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

Chief TXJ: As explained by you, I understood such from his writing (article), but I was looking for his analysis and/or prediction as to how good or bad we will do in Russia.

In his writing, he provided no suggestion as to how things will be for us in this World cup (WC) and hence I wondered why the LONG story which is irrelevant to our WC.

_________________
And the BIBLE says: The race is NOT for the swift, neither is the battle for the strong nor ... but time and chance makes them all.
Ecclesiastes 1:18: For in much wisdom is much grief and he that increases knowledge increases sorrow.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 5:40 pm 
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Odas wrote:
txj wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


This is what he is saying; note the underlined esp:

Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.

They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.


This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

Chief TXJ: As explained by you, I understood such from his writing (article), but I was looking for his analysis and/or prediction as to how good or bad we will do in Russia.

In his writing, he provided no suggestion as to how things will be for us in this World cup (WC) and hence I wondered why the LONG story which is irrelevant to our WC.


It may be a 'long story' but it is very relevant. Not sure why it is necessary for him to tell you how things will be for us in this WC...

_________________
Image
Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:22 pm 
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Location: Ukwuani
txj wrote:
Odas wrote:
txj wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


This is what he is saying; note the underlined esp:

Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.

They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.


This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

Chief TXJ: As explained by you, I understood such from his writing (article), but I was looking for his analysis and/or prediction as to how good or bad we will do in Russia.

In his writing, he provided no suggestion as to how things will be for us in this World cup (WC) and hence I wondered why the LONG story which is irrelevant to our WC.


It may be a 'long story' but it is very relevant. Not sure why it is necessary for him to tell you how things will be for us in this WC...

Bros TXJ: I see Chief Odegbami as someone who has a good knowledge of the game (having played it in a higher level) and hence I was looking for his opinion regarding our World cup in Russia

_________________
And the BIBLE says: The race is NOT for the swift, neither is the battle for the strong nor ... but time and chance makes them all.
Ecclesiastes 1:18: For in much wisdom is much grief and he that increases knowledge increases sorrow.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:54 pm 
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Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?
He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Great observation Waffiman.
While I respect Odegbami's contributions to our football, I believe he cannot hide his politics
with regards Naija football. This is the same person who campaigned for Nigeria to host WC 2010.

With this write-up, all he is doing is paving the way for an 'I-told-you-so' if the SE flops in Russia.

_________________
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stand idly by while one of his creations slaughters another simply in his name, is a mystery I
doubt theologists would dare touch.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:58 pm 
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Odas wrote:
txj wrote:
Odas wrote:
txj wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


This is what he is saying; note the underlined esp:

Nigerian players play more from instinct than through orchestrated team tactics. This is because of the limitation in their domestic home-grounding.

They depend on their exceptional individual skillful players in the team who can do individual magic with the ball and express themselves to the delight of any coach that appreciates and uses this as part of his team tactics.

Westerhof and Jo Bonfere, two former Dutch coaches of the team, were masters at this game of applying the natural strength of Nigerian players as a team tactic and getting the best out of the team without necessarily being over tactical.


This maybe what Genrot Rohr has not discovered and has not applied to the present Super Eagles from the last few matches against non-African teams that the team has played.

Chief TXJ: As explained by you, I understood such from his writing (article), but I was looking for his analysis and/or prediction as to how good or bad we will do in Russia.

In his writing, he provided no suggestion as to how things will be for us in this World cup (WC) and hence I wondered why the LONG story which is irrelevant to our WC.


It may be a 'long story' but it is very relevant. Not sure why it is necessary for him to tell you how things will be for us in this WC...

Bros TXJ: I see Chief Odegbami as someone who has a good knowledge of the game (having played it in a higher level) and hence I was looking for his opinion regarding our World cup in Russia


He gave you his opinion- broadly sketched out.

Seems to me what u are looking for is his prediction. Not everyone is in the Ms Cleo business...

_________________
Image
Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:00 pm 
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txj wrote:
He gave you his opinion- broadly sketched out.

Seems to me what u are looking for is his prediction. Not everyone is in the Ms Cleo business...


I have to say it is an improvement when Chief used to give his opinion on the Eagles he hardly bothers to watch.

_________________
I pledge to Nigeria my country
To be faithful, loyal and honest
To serve Nigeria with all my strength
To defend her unity and uphold her honor and glory
So help me God.


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:30 am 
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Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

To summarise, our key strength in the past has been individual player's natural skills and combining that with fast paced attacking to achieve results.

That usually relied on a majority of our players who started in the local leagues before they relocated abroad.

This time round, we have a team with a large foreign born contingent who never played locally in Nigeria.

This is new territory and will significantly affect the shape of our international matches going forward.

To improve our prospects in future, we need to pay serious attention to the development of the local Nigerian league.

_________________
MAGA - Make Arsenal Great Again.

“Emery put on so many videos I ran out of popcorn,” former player Joaquín quipped, “he’s obsessed by football, it’s practically an illness.”

Post Wenger-Arsenal go sweero


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:37 am 
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cchinukw wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

To summarise, our key strength in the past has been individual player's natural skills and combining that with fast paced attacking to achieve results.

That usually relied on a majority of our players who started in the local leagues before they relocated abroad.

This time round, we have a team with a large foreign born contingent who never played locally in Nigeria.

This is new territory and will significantly affect the shape of our international matches going forward.

To improve our prospects in future, we need to pay serious attention to the development of the local Nigerian league.



He is also saying that you are using second rate european trained soccer players. :P


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 Post subject: Re: SAYS ODEGBAMI
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:12 pm 
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Waffiman wrote:
Odas wrote:
With all due respect to Chief Odegbami, can someone please tell me what the big boss is saying? I was looking for his analysis and prediction; that is, if we will do well or badly in this World cup (in Russia), but I saw none of such. Thus, what is he saying, please?

He appears to be saying everything and nothing at the same time. It is called football politricks. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


He actually said everything there is to say about Nigeria.

We need people like SO in our setup.

_________________
Image
Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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