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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 6:09 pm 
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Without you France and Croatia are the same. Well done for bringing the WC to France via Africa. :clap: :clap: :clap:

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 6:13 pm 
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They've done well.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 6:50 pm 
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They are not Africans. They are FRENCH or Afro-French, but still FRENCH :wink:

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Eto’o, Ronaldinho, Deco, and Messi are like good caviar, tender pine-nuts, chemical-free sea salt, and the purest of virgin olive oils, said one of the world's greatest chefs, Ferran Adria of El Bulli restaurant, Before Barca went on to wallop Madrid 3-0 at the Bernabeu.

“I believe the target of anything in life should be to do it so well that it becomes an art. Football is like that. When I watch Barcelona, it is art” — Arsène Wenger, August 2009


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 7:13 pm 
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World Cup patriotism may be a glorious distraction, but it can't disguise the racism in French society
https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/wo ... 34366.html
It is no coincidence that, 20 years on from France’s 1998 World Cup win, ethnic minorities still have very little chance of advancing in a rigidly exclusive country

As England football fans know only too well, there is very little to match the outpouring of patriotic fever that accompanies a successful World Cup run. Beyond occasional bouts of excessive drunkenness and minor hooliganism, it is generally a supremely joyful and positive phenomenon.

In France, the national squad is invariably made up of players from ethnic and religious minorities and tends to deliver a warm feeling of unity once every two years, whether during a European Championship or as at present, a World Cup. Crowds jump around in front of oversized TV screens, strangers hug and whoever you are, you can join in the celebrations.

Last weekend, millions cheered on Les Bleus – France’s national team – to a win over Argentina in Russia. Tricolours waved at gatherings across the land, as the team once more became a symbol of a dynamic, egalitarian country in which those from immigrant descent can be loved and respected. The sense of pride and expectation will certainly be the same today, when France play Uruguay for a place in the World Cup semifinals.

Stars include Kylian Mbappé, the son of an Algerian mother and Cameroonian father, along with Paul Pogba, N’Golo Kanté, Blaise Matuidi and Benjamin Mendy. All are from African families and were born and brought up on the rundown estates around Paris – an area said to be the greatest pool of footballing talent on the globe after the Sao Paulo favelas. They are feted as heroes, who seemingly personify the very best of French values.

Beyond the handful of multimillionaire footballers, the reality for men and women of the same origin is very different, however. Following the Argentina win, the non-football related violence which broke out in Breil in the western city of Nantes on Tuesday (around the time that England was beating Colombia to reach the World Cup quarterfinals) was far more indicative of the actual state of modern France as it pertains to the young and the disadvantaged.

In summary, police shot dead Aboubakar Fofana, a 22-year-old Frenchman from a Guinean background, after trying to arrest him in Breil. The killing prompted thousands to take to the streets, throwing Molotov cocktails, burning cars and buildings and attacking the forces sent out to quell the fire. Disturbances have gone on all week
.

Apart from signalling the start of yet another summer of urban disorder, Fofana’s death says everything about what really happens to a disturbingly high number of people with African and Arab roots who have grown up in the no-hope warrens that surround major cities.

Men like Pogba – a tall, powerfully built, black Muslim who, as Fofana, has Guinean parents – are just the kind who are routinely demonised. Politicians and media commentators whip up hatred against the so-called “banlieusards”, shorthand for out-of-towners, who are given next to no opportunity of joining the mainstream and the decent housing and jobs that go with it. Instead they view them as potential criminals, up to and including terrorists..

It is no coincidence that, 20 years on from France’s 1998 World Cup win, they still have very little chance of advancing in a rigidly exclusive society. Youth unemployment is as prevalent as discrimination around the Paris suburbs.

It was very noticeable that Marine Le Pen, the Front National candidate who came runner-up to Emmanuel Macron in last year’s presidential elections, did not “do football” during her venomous campaign. Her party now calls itself the National Rally (NR), but continues to be determinedly xenophobic.

The NR’s anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim agenda, and the millions of French people who support it, is certainly worth considering in the context of France’s latest sporting adventure. It was Le Pen’s father, the convicted racist, Holocaust denier and FN founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, who spoke out against the “rainbow team” that won the World Cup two decades ago. Noting the number of footballers from “foreign countries” – for which read the descendants of immigrants from former colonies – he questioned their suitability to represent France.

The NR is not the only party that wants to keep perceived outsiders in their place, either. The opposition Republicans – the latest name for France’s Gaullist conservatives – remain as reactionary as ever, while Macron himself has frequently displayed a bigoted streak. At a G20 press conference in Hamburg last summer he spoke of the “civilisational” problems caused by African mothers having too many children. “Seven or eight children per woman” were Macron’s exact words, as he rehearsed a cliché favoured by those who object to the large immigrant families in their midst.

International football might be considered a very minor antidote to such racist sentiment. To view it as anything more than a fleeting distraction from the unpleasant reality that can underpin French patriotism is well wide of the mark.

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Eto’o, Ronaldinho, Deco, and Messi are like good caviar, tender pine-nuts, chemical-free sea salt, and the purest of virgin olive oils, said one of the world's greatest chefs, Ferran Adria of El Bulli restaurant, Before Barca went on to wallop Madrid 3-0 at the Bernabeu.

“I believe the target of anything in life should be to do it so well that it becomes an art. Football is like that. When I watch Barcelona, it is art” — Arsène Wenger, August 2009


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 7:37 pm 
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A Beautiful Vision of a Country That Doesn’t Exist
What the children of immigrants see when they watch France in the World Cup

https://slate.com/culture/2018/07/the-f ... story.html

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Eto’o, Ronaldinho, Deco, and Messi are like good caviar, tender pine-nuts, chemical-free sea salt, and the purest of virgin olive oils, said one of the world's greatest chefs, Ferran Adria of El Bulli restaurant, Before Barca went on to wallop Madrid 3-0 at the Bernabeu.

“I believe the target of anything in life should be to do it so well that it becomes an art. Football is like that. When I watch Barcelona, it is art” — Arsène Wenger, August 2009


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 7:41 pm 
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Vincent. wrote:
A Beautiful Vision of a Country That Doesn’t Exist
What the children of immigrants see when they watch France in the World Cup

https://slate.com/culture/2018/07/the-f ... story.html



Let them dream.The story is the same even if England won.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 7:47 pm 
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EMIR KONGI JAFFI JOFFA wrote:
Vincent. wrote:
A Beautiful Vision of a Country That Doesn’t Exist
What the children of immigrants see when they watch France in the World Cup

https://slate.com/culture/2018/07/the-f ... story.html



Let them dream.The story is the same even if England won.

Agreed. However, British police don't go around shooting black/Arab kids. France has a lot to learn from Britain in that regard.

This is a great opportunity to shed light on the problems of those minorities who are not football stars.

When France won the World Cup 20 years ago, Liliam Thuram (the defender) tried to take the opportunity to shed light on the reality of French Blacks and North Africans who are no footballers, but nothing changed. I hope the latest World Cup win will go a long way toward achieving those goals...

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Eto’o, Ronaldinho, Deco, and Messi are like good caviar, tender pine-nuts, chemical-free sea salt, and the purest of virgin olive oils, said one of the world's greatest chefs, Ferran Adria of El Bulli restaurant, Before Barca went on to wallop Madrid 3-0 at the Bernabeu.

“I believe the target of anything in life should be to do it so well that it becomes an art. Football is like that. When I watch Barcelona, it is art” — Arsène Wenger, August 2009


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:30 am 
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EMIR KONGI JAFFI JOFFA wrote:
Without you France and Croatia are the same. Well done for bringing the WC to France via Africa. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Yes sir, it feels so good to see several Africans playing in the world cup final. I know many people in the world think that Africans are inferior, but France's victory shows what African teams could do if they were organized. France is like an African team operating through the vehicle of European organization. If Africa was as organized as Europe, by now an Africa country would have won the World Cup.

France just brought the Cup trophy to Africa without African's even realizing it ! :mrgreen: :laugh:


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:11 pm 
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5 games sweet o
DNA no good o

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WC Quarter Finals sweet o
DNA no good o


@the Mod who deleted my Fine Jersey FC crying thread...dis 1-2 pain you


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 1:29 pm 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fY3Z3od-kE8&t=10s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgxXRe45gTk





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 1:51 pm 
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Vincent. wrote:
Agreed. However, British police don't go around shooting black/Arab kids. France has a lot to learn from Britain in that regard.

This is a great opportunity to shed light on the problems of those minorities who are not football stars.

When France won the World Cup 20 years ago, Liliam Thuram (the defender) tried to take the opportunity to shed light on the reality of French Blacks and North Africans who are no footballers, but nothing changed. I hope the latest World Cup win will go a long way toward achieving those goals...


Any country outside of Africa or the Caribbean that has mixed populations will bring up the question of Racism. This wouldn't be different if it was Colombia, Brazil, Sweden, Germany, the USA etc.

Light needs to be shed on such issues but in all honesty our people play everywhere. If you don't want to support any of that just stick to African teams.


As stated many times over here, France's victory shows what our people can do if they are well financed and organized. We have the talent, but the problem is do we have the institutions to harness their abilities, teach them the right ways to play football, the experience to teach them how to defend, pass, shoot, make the decisions.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 3:05 pm 
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TheHitman47 wrote:
Vincent. wrote:
Agreed. However, British police don't go around shooting black/Arab kids. France has a lot to learn from Britain in that regard.

This is a great opportunity to shed light on the problems of those minorities who are not football stars.

When France won the World Cup 20 years ago, Liliam Thuram (the defender) tried to take the opportunity to shed light on the reality of French Blacks and North Africans who are no footballers, but nothing changed. I hope the latest World Cup win will go a long way toward achieving those goals...


Any country outside of Africa or the Caribbean that has mixed populations will bring up the question of Racism. This wouldn't be different if it was Colombia, Brazil, Sweden, Germany, the USA etc.

Light needs to be shed on such issues but in all honesty our people play everywhere. If you don't want to support any of that just stick to African teams.


As stated many times over here, France's victory shows what our people can do if they are well financed and organized. We have the talent, but the problem is do we have the institutions to harness their abilities, teach them the right ways to play football, the experience to teach them how to defend, pass, shoot, make the decisions.


When has our talent ever been in doubt?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 3:10 pm 
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kalani JR wrote:
As stated many times over here, France's victory shows what our people can do if they are well financed and organized. We have the talent, but the problem is do we have the institutions to harness their abilities, teach them the right ways to play football, the experience to teach them how to defend, pass, shoot, make the decisions.


When has our talent ever been in doubt?[/quote]


Did I say our talent was in doubt? I think our tactical and decisions making is in doubt though.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 3:18 pm 
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Vincent. wrote:
They are not Africans. They are FRENCH or Afro-French, but still FRENCH :wink:


not if they would have lost in the first round... they would have said the team had too many immigrants.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 3:59 pm 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNBnJ5_2Jyo



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 6:57 pm 
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Vincent. wrote:
They are not Africans. They are FRENCH or Afro-French, but still FRENCH :wink:


KPOM

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:41 pm 
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These guys are french, everything about them is french, their attitude, personality french, they have french wives snd children, they probably dont give a hoot about the african continent, the only thing that gives them away is their names and possibly tough african upbringing, with all their success and millionaire lifestyle, they are just as european as their fellow citizens

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:49 pm 
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I will be the first to say it here that African country will win 2026 world cup in USA if it 2022 it did not happen.
Then I will also be the first to say its coming home when 2030 is host by Algeria,Morocco and Tunisia .


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 3:42 am 
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Vincent. wrote:
World Cup patriotism may be a glorious distraction, but it can't disguise the racism in French society
https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/wo ... 34366.html
It is no coincidence that, 20 years on from France’s 1998 World Cup win, ethnic minorities still have very little chance of advancing in a rigidly exclusive country

As England football fans know only too well, there is very little to match the outpouring of patriotic fever that accompanies a successful World Cup run. Beyond occasional bouts of excessive drunkenness and minor hooliganism, it is generally a supremely joyful and positive phenomenon.

In France, the national squad is invariably made up of players from ethnic and religious minorities and tends to deliver a warm feeling of unity once every two years, whether during a European Championship or as at present, a World Cup. Crowds jump around in front of oversized TV screens, strangers hug and whoever you are, you can join in the celebrations.

Last weekend, millions cheered on Les Bleus – France’s national team – to a win over Argentina in Russia. Tricolours waved at gatherings across the land, as the team once more became a symbol of a dynamic, egalitarian country in which those from immigrant descent can be loved and respected. The sense of pride and expectation will certainly be the same today, when France play Uruguay for a place in the World Cup semifinals.

Stars include Kylian Mbappé, the son of an Algerian mother and Cameroonian father, along with Paul Pogba, N’Golo Kanté, Blaise Matuidi and Benjamin Mendy. All are from African families and were born and brought up on the rundown estates around Paris – an area said to be the greatest pool of footballing talent on the globe after the Sao Paulo favelas. They are feted as heroes, who seemingly personify the very best of French values.

Beyond the handful of multimillionaire footballers, the reality for men and women of the same origin is very different, however. Following the Argentina win, the non-football related violence which broke out in Breil in the western city of Nantes on Tuesday (around the time that England was beating Colombia to reach the World Cup quarterfinals) was far more indicative of the actual state of modern France as it pertains to the young and the disadvantaged.

In summary, police shot dead Aboubakar Fofana, a 22-year-old Frenchman from a Guinean background, after trying to arrest him in Breil. The killing prompted thousands to take to the streets, throwing Molotov cocktails, burning cars and buildings and attacking the forces sent out to quell the fire. Disturbances have gone on all week
.

Apart from signalling the start of yet another summer of urban disorder, Fofana’s death says everything about what really happens to a disturbingly high number of people with African and Arab roots who have grown up in the no-hope warrens that surround major cities.

Men like Pogba – a tall, powerfully built, black Muslim who, as Fofana, has Guinean parents – are just the kind who are routinely demonised. Politicians and media commentators whip up hatred against the so-called “banlieusards”, shorthand for out-of-towners, who are given next to no opportunity of joining the mainstream and the decent housing and jobs that go with it. Instead they view them as potential criminals, up to and including terrorists..

It is no coincidence that, 20 years on from France’s 1998 World Cup win, they still have very little chance of advancing in a rigidly exclusive society. Youth unemployment is as prevalent as discrimination around the Paris suburbs.

It was very noticeable that Marine Le Pen, the Front National candidate who came runner-up to Emmanuel Macron in last year’s presidential elections, did not “do football” during her venomous campaign. Her party now calls itself the National Rally (NR), but continues to be determinedly xenophobic.

The NR’s anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim agenda, and the millions of French people who support it, is certainly worth considering in the context of France’s latest sporting adventure. It was Le Pen’s father, the convicted racist, Holocaust denier and FN founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, who spoke out against the “rainbow team” that won the World Cup two decades ago. Noting the number of footballers from “foreign countries” – for which read the descendants of immigrants from former colonies – he questioned their suitability to represent France.

The NR is not the only party that wants to keep perceived outsiders in their place, either. The opposition Republicans – the latest name for France’s Gaullist conservatives – remain as reactionary as ever, while Macron himself has frequently displayed a bigoted streak. At a G20 press conference in Hamburg last summer he spoke of the “civilisational” problems caused by African mothers having too many children. “Seven or eight children per woman” were Macron’s exact words, as he rehearsed a cliché favoured by those who object to the large immigrant families in their midst.

International football might be considered a very minor antidote to such racist sentiment. To view it as anything more than a fleeting distraction from the unpleasant reality that can underpin French patriotism is well wide of the mark.


Pogba a Muslim ? :shock:

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 5:09 am 
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Ogolo Makambo wrote:
Vincent. wrote:
World Cup patriotism may be a glorious distraction, but it can't disguise the racism in French society
https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/wo ... 34366.html
It is no coincidence that, 20 years on from France’s 1998 World Cup win, ethnic minorities still have very little chance of advancing in a rigidly exclusive country

As England football fans know only too well, there is very little to match the outpouring of patriotic fever that accompanies a successful World Cup run. Beyond occasional bouts of excessive drunkenness and minor hooliganism, it is generally a supremely joyful and positive phenomenon.

In France, the national squad is invariably made up of players from ethnic and religious minorities and tends to deliver a warm feeling of unity once every two years, whether during a European Championship or as at present, a World Cup. Crowds jump around in front of oversized TV screens, strangers hug and whoever you are, you can join in the celebrations.

Last weekend, millions cheered on Les Bleus – France’s national team – to a win over Argentina in Russia. Tricolours waved at gatherings across the land, as the team once more became a symbol of a dynamic, egalitarian country in which those from immigrant descent can be loved and respected. The sense of pride and expectation will certainly be the same today, when France play Uruguay for a place in the World Cup semifinals.

Stars include Kylian Mbappé, the son of an Algerian mother and Cameroonian father, along with Paul Pogba, N’Golo Kanté, Blaise Matuidi and Benjamin Mendy. All are from African families and were born and brought up on the rundown estates around Paris – an area said to be the greatest pool of footballing talent on the globe after the Sao Paulo favelas. They are feted as heroes, who seemingly personify the very best of French values.

Beyond the handful of multimillionaire footballers, the reality for men and women of the same origin is very different, however. Following the Argentina win, the non-football related violence which broke out in Breil in the western city of Nantes on Tuesday (around the time that England was beating Colombia to reach the World Cup quarterfinals) was far more indicative of the actual state of modern France as it pertains to the young and the disadvantaged.

In summary, police shot dead Aboubakar Fofana, a 22-year-old Frenchman from a Guinean background, after trying to arrest him in Breil. The killing prompted thousands to take to the streets, throwing Molotov cocktails, burning cars and buildings and attacking the forces sent out to quell the fire. Disturbances have gone on all week
.

Apart from signalling the start of yet another summer of urban disorder, Fofana’s death says everything about what really happens to a disturbingly high number of people with African and Arab roots who have grown up in the no-hope warrens that surround major cities.

Men like Pogba – a tall, powerfully built, black Muslim who, as Fofana, has Guinean parents – are just the kind who are routinely demonised. Politicians and media commentators whip up hatred against the so-called “banlieusards”, shorthand for out-of-towners, who are given next to no opportunity of joining the mainstream and the decent housing and jobs that go with it. Instead they view them as potential criminals, up to and including terrorists..

It is no coincidence that, 20 years on from France’s 1998 World Cup win, they still have very little chance of advancing in a rigidly exclusive society. Youth unemployment is as prevalent as discrimination around the Paris suburbs.

It was very noticeable that Marine Le Pen, the Front National candidate who came runner-up to Emmanuel Macron in last year’s presidential elections, did not “do football” during her venomous campaign. Her party now calls itself the National Rally (NR), but continues to be determinedly xenophobic.

The NR’s anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim agenda, and the millions of French people who support it, is certainly worth considering in the context of France’s latest sporting adventure. It was Le Pen’s father, the convicted racist, Holocaust denier and FN founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, who spoke out against the “rainbow team” that won the World Cup two decades ago. Noting the number of footballers from “foreign countries” – for which read the descendants of immigrants from former colonies – he questioned their suitability to represent France.

The NR is not the only party that wants to keep perceived outsiders in their place, either. The opposition Republicans – the latest name for France’s Gaullist conservatives – remain as reactionary as ever, while Macron himself has frequently displayed a bigoted streak. At a G20 press conference in Hamburg last summer he spoke of the “civilisational” problems caused by African mothers having too many children. “Seven or eight children per woman” were Macron’s exact words, as he rehearsed a cliché favoured by those who object to the large immigrant families in their midst.

International football might be considered a very minor antidote to such racist sentiment. To view it as anything more than a fleeting distraction from the unpleasant reality that can underpin French patriotism is well wide of the mark.


Pogba a Muslim ? :shock:


his roots are from a country that is about 90 percent muslim... shocking that he too would be muslim!

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:01 am 
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France doesn't just steal funds from Africans they actually steal people too.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 1:01 pm 
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What a stupid and ignorant thread. These guys are French !!

This the same argument made by white racists in France. Straight from the "too black to be French" playbook.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 9:04 pm 
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You can't be serious ...
They were born in France. Trained by France... What exactly makes them non-French? Can you tell us?
The types of statements you make is move counter productive ... than whatever you are actually trying to do.
Kabalega wrote:
France doesn't just steal funds from Africans they actually steal people too.


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