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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:44 pm 
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bepanda wrote:
I didn't say that we must return home. I said we should strive to create jobs in Africa by leveraging the skills we have specialized in, coupled with entrepreneurship, mentorship, virtual infrastructure.
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
The loss of sport talents is extremely minimal compared to the loss of Engineers, Technicians, Doctors, Economics and Financial experts, ... etc.
Here is the real question for Africans: How can Africans, who have gained massive experience in foreign countries (USA, Europe, ... etc) pay Africa back? How can you prevent the next generation of Africans to follow you in Europe and America and therefore continue the brain drain of Africa?
The answer is very simple: Mentorship, Entrepreneurship, Investment in the people who are in Africa.
Most Africans who have lived abroad for let's say 10+ years have built enough expertise in their field, so that they can actually transfer that knowledge back to people in their home countries. As an example: If you understand how to build websites, what prevents you from setting up a business in Cameroon/Nigeria to do the same, then set up an infrastructure in Europe/America to outsource some of these tasks to Africa? How difficult is this really? This can be done in almost every field of work. There are plenty of websites today, where you can create jobs and assign them to experts all over the world. upwork.com is the most popular. The Asian countries are doing it. Why can't African countries do it? We don't need to re-invent the wheels. These jobs can create a solid middle class in Africa, that can help support other things like a football league, housing, ... etc.
It all starts with a middle class that has job opportunities and receives a consistent pay. Not everyone wants to leave Africa to move overseas. But we can't wait for Europeans and Americans to invest in our people. I believe that each and every African in USA/Europe must find a way to start a business, train and mentor talent back home and outsource some of the tasks of his/her business to resources in Africa. It does two things. It provides the talent back home with job and pay. It provides them some work experience, mentorship, training to the same standard and expectations as Europeans/Americans workforces. In addition, these new values (punctuality, responsibility, reliability, high work rate, high quality of work, ...) they learned from working with you can be translated to their daily lives. They can use it to influence their environments and impact change. The real key is how you mentor and manage them. Only demand high standards.
And please don't tell me you need $1M to start a business. You can start a business for less than $100 in every state in the USA.

You forgot an important point. Sacrifice. I remember in the late eighties, reading that there were more Korean engineers going back to Korea than emigrating to the US. I bet those going back were taking a payout, but they did it anyway.

I do not believe virtual mentorship can work in an african context.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:44 pm 
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There will always be those who want to leave. But there will also be those who want to stay. We need to figure out ways to create jobs for them. That should be the challenge of every African who lives in the Diaspora. "How can you leverage your expertise to build at least one job in Africa". That's the question we need to ask ourselves. There are plenty of ways to do it.
Bepanda
Eaglezbeak wrote:
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
The loss of sport talents is extremely minimal compared to the loss of Engineers, Technicians, Doctors, Economics and Financial experts, ... etc.
Here is the real question for Africans: How can Africans, who have gained massive experience in foreign countries (USA, Europe, ... etc) pay Africa back? How can you prevent the next generation of Africans to follow you in Europe and America and therefore continue the brain drain of Africa?
The answer is very simple: Mentorship, Entrepreneurship, Investment in the people who are in Africa.
Most Africans who have lived abroad for let's say 10+ years have built enough expertise in their field, so that they can actually transfer that knowledge back to people in their home countries. As an example: If you understand how to build websites, what prevents you from setting up a business in Cameroon/Nigeria to do the same, then set up an infrastructure in Europe/America to outsource some of these tasks to Africa? How difficult is this really? This can be done in almost every field of work. There are plenty of websites today, where you can create jobs and assign them to experts all over the world. upwork.com is the most popular. The Asian countries are doing it. Why can't African countries do it? We don't need to re-invent the wheels. These jobs can create a solid middle class in Africa, that can help support other things like a football league, housing, ... etc.
It all starts with a middle class that has job opportunities and receives a consistent pay. Not everyone wants to leave Africa to move overseas. But we can't wait for Europeans and Americans to invest in our people. I believe that each and every African in USA/Europe must find a way to start a business, train and mentor talent back home and outsource some of the tasks of his/her business to resources in Africa. It does two things. It provides the talent back home with job and pay. It provides them some work experience, mentorship, training to the same standard and expectations as Europeans/Americans workforces. In addition, these new values (punctuality, responsibility, reliability, high work rate, high quality of work, ...) they learned from working with you can be translated to their daily lives. They can use it to influence their environments and impact change. The real key is how you mentor and manage them. Only demand high standards.
And please don't tell me you need $1M to start a business. You can start a business for less than $100 in every state in the USA.

You forgot an important point. Sacrifice. I remember in the late eighties, reading that there were more Korean engineers going back to Korea than emigrating to the US. I bet those going back were taking a payout, but they did it anyway.

Most Africans are blinded by the bright lights of Europe/America so how are you going to fix a mentality that has caused deaths in the Sahara and Meditaranian?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:40 pm 
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Scipio Africanus wrote:
How do we stop African countries from losing talent? Very simple answer, but very difficult to put into practice. Make African countries so desirable to live in, that people would never dream of leaving it. So desirable to live in, that we have net immigration into Africa.

You said it all.

The bottom line is, if you have something and you don't value it, some else will. Whilst I celebrate the Africaness of those players who won the WC I also recognise their victory is also to do with France who gave them every chance of succeeding and becoming champions.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:45 pm 
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Waffiman wrote:
Scipio Africanus wrote:
How do we stop African countries from losing talent? Very simple answer, but very difficult to put into practice. Make African countries so desirable to live in, that people would never dream of leaving it. So desirable to live in, that we have net immigration into Africa.

You said it all.

The bottom line is, if you have something and you don't value it, some else will. Whilst I celebrate the Africaness of those players who won the WC I also recognise their victory is also to do with France who gave them every chance of succeeding and becoming champions.


Africa isn't losing talents really, it's one thing if they were teenagers when they left, the players on their squad that were born in Africa left as babies. Even so Nigeria at least has more than enough talent to be amongst the best in the world.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:56 pm 
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kalani JR wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Scipio Africanus wrote:
How do we stop African countries from losing talent? Very simple answer, but very difficult to put into practice. Make African countries so desirable to live in, that people would never dream of leaving it. So desirable to live in, that we have net immigration into Africa.

You said it all.

The bottom line is, if you have something and you don't value it, some else will. Whilst I celebrate the Africaness of those players who won the WC I also recognise their victory is also to do with France who gave them every chance of succeeding and becoming champions.


Africa isn't losing talents really, it's one thing if they were teenagers when they left, the players on their squad that were born in Africa left as babies. Even so Nigeria at least has more than enough talent to be amongst the best in the world.

According to this link, there are 3.5 millions persons of african descent in France. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noirs_en_France
and yet they were the majority of the players in the national team.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:04 pm 
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camex wrote:
According to this link, there are 3.5 millions persons of african descent in France. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noirs_en_France
and yet they were the majority of the players in the national team.

..and so?

13% of the American population is black and yet 95% of the national basketball team is black

My point: This is nothing new in sports

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:06 pm 
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Rawlings wrote:
camex wrote:
According to this link, there are 3.5 millions persons of african descent in France. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noirs_en_France
and yet they were the majority of the players in the national team.

..and so?

13% of the American population is black and yet 95% of the national basketball team is black

My point: This is nothing new in sports

Cameroon has 25 millions people but did not qualify for the world cup.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:10 pm 
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kalani JR wrote:
Waffiman wrote:
Scipio Africanus wrote:
How do we stop African countries from losing talent? Very simple answer, but very difficult to put into practice. Make African countries so desirable to live in, that people would never dream of leaving it. So desirable to live in, that we have net immigration into Africa.

You said it all.

The bottom line is, if you have something and you don't value it, some else will. Whilst I celebrate the Africaness of those players who won the WC I also recognise their victory is also to do with France who gave them every chance of succeeding and becoming champions.


Africa isn't losing talents really, it's one thing if they were teenagers when they left, the players on their squad that were born in Africa left as babies. Even so Nigeria at least has more than enough talent to be amongst the best in the world.

My point is not about our children only.

Africa is losing its greatest resource. For everyone of us not living in Africa, we are giving the best years of our lives to the country that gave us opportunity of a better life. Our children and grandchildren will follow our path. As we can see from France now, we will with England in time.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:22 pm 
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Can you elaborate? Also, if you could give concrete examples of challenges faced ...
Furthermore, I don't believe in the philosophy that things cannot be done... This is defeatism at its best ...
Africans need to stop saying "things can't be done".
Instead they need to ask the question: "How can it be done successfully".
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
I didn't say that we must return home. I said we should strive to create jobs in Africa by leveraging the skills we have specialized in, coupled with entrepreneurship, mentorship, virtual infrastructure.
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
The loss of sport talents is extremely minimal compared to the loss of Engineers, Technicians, Doctors, Economics and Financial experts, ... etc.
Here is the real question for Africans: How can Africans, who have gained massive experience in foreign countries (USA, Europe, ... etc) pay Africa back? How can you prevent the next generation of Africans to follow you in Europe and America and therefore continue the brain drain of Africa?
The answer is very simple: Mentorship, Entrepreneurship, Investment in the people who are in Africa.
Most Africans who have lived abroad for let's say 10+ years have built enough expertise in their field, so that they can actually transfer that knowledge back to people in their home countries. As an example: If you understand how to build websites, what prevents you from setting up a business in Cameroon/Nigeria to do the same, then set up an infrastructure in Europe/America to outsource some of these tasks to Africa? How difficult is this really? This can be done in almost every field of work. There are plenty of websites today, where you can create jobs and assign them to experts all over the world. upwork.com is the most popular. The Asian countries are doing it. Why can't African countries do it? We don't need to re-invent the wheels. These jobs can create a solid middle class in Africa, that can help support other things like a football league, housing, ... etc.
It all starts with a middle class that has job opportunities and receives a consistent pay. Not everyone wants to leave Africa to move overseas. But we can't wait for Europeans and Americans to invest in our people. I believe that each and every African in USA/Europe must find a way to start a business, train and mentor talent back home and outsource some of the tasks of his/her business to resources in Africa. It does two things. It provides the talent back home with job and pay. It provides them some work experience, mentorship, training to the same standard and expectations as Europeans/Americans workforces. In addition, these new values (punctuality, responsibility, reliability, high work rate, high quality of work, ...) they learned from working with you can be translated to their daily lives. They can use it to influence their environments and impact change. The real key is how you mentor and manage them. Only demand high standards.
And please don't tell me you need $1M to start a business. You can start a business for less than $100 in every state in the USA.

You forgot an important point. Sacrifice. I remember in the late eighties, reading that there were more Korean engineers going back to Korea than emigrating to the US. I bet those going back were taking a payout, but they did it anyway.

I do not believe virtual mentorship can work in an african context.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:27 pm 
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bepanda wrote:
Can you elaborate? Also, if you could give concrete examples of challenges faced ...
Furthermore, I don't believe in the philosophy that things cannot be done... This is defeatism at its best ...
Africans need to stop saying "things can't be done".
Instead they need to ask the question: "How can it be done successfully".
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
I didn't say that we must return home. I said we should strive to create jobs in Africa by leveraging the skills we have specialized in, coupled with entrepreneurship, mentorship, virtual infrastructure.
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
The loss of sport talents is extremely minimal compared to the loss of Engineers, Technicians, Doctors, Economics and Financial experts, ... etc.
Here is the real question for Africans: How can Africans, who have gained massive experience in foreign countries (USA, Europe, ... etc) pay Africa back? How can you prevent the next generation of Africans to follow you in Europe and America and therefore continue the brain drain of Africa?
The answer is very simple: Mentorship, Entrepreneurship, Investment in the people who are in Africa.
Most Africans who have lived abroad for let's say 10+ years have built enough expertise in their field, so that they can actually transfer that knowledge back to people in their home countries. As an example: If you understand how to build websites, what prevents you from setting up a business in Cameroon/Nigeria to do the same, then set up an infrastructure in Europe/America to outsource some of these tasks to Africa? How difficult is this really? This can be done in almost every field of work. There are plenty of websites today, where you can create jobs and assign them to experts all over the world. upwork.com is the most popular. The Asian countries are doing it. Why can't African countries do it? We don't need to re-invent the wheels. These jobs can create a solid middle class in Africa, that can help support other things like a football league, housing, ... etc.
It all starts with a middle class that has job opportunities and receives a consistent pay. Not everyone wants to leave Africa to move overseas. But we can't wait for Europeans and Americans to invest in our people. I believe that each and every African in USA/Europe must find a way to start a business, train and mentor talent back home and outsource some of the tasks of his/her business to resources in Africa. It does two things. It provides the talent back home with job and pay. It provides them some work experience, mentorship, training to the same standard and expectations as Europeans/Americans workforces. In addition, these new values (punctuality, responsibility, reliability, high work rate, high quality of work, ...) they learned from working with you can be translated to their daily lives. They can use it to influence their environments and impact change. The real key is how you mentor and manage them. Only demand high standards.
And please don't tell me you need $1M to start a business. You can start a business for less than $100 in every state in the USA.

You forgot an important point. Sacrifice. I remember in the late eighties, reading that there were more Korean engineers going back to Korea than emigrating to the US. I bet those going back were taking a payout, but they did it anyway.

I do not believe virtual mentorship can work in an african context.

There are various examples if you care to look around. For example Houston 5th ward had many black professionals during segregation. When Jim crow ended the professionals all move out of the neighborhood. The role model for the next generation were drug pushers and the like. The economy of the neighborhood has collapsed.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:46 pm 
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camex wrote:
Rawlings wrote:
camex wrote:
According to this link, there are 3.5 millions persons of african descent in France. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noirs_en_France
and yet they were the majority of the players in the national team.

..and so?

13% of the American population is black and yet 95% of the national basketball team is black

My point: This is nothing new in sports

Cameroon has 25 millions people but did not qualify for the world cup.


:???: DUH! what does this have to do with the discussion?

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:58 pm 
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Rawlings wrote:
camex wrote:
Rawlings wrote:
camex wrote:
According to this link, there are 3.5 millions persons of african descent in France. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noirs_en_France
and yet they were the majority of the players in the national team.

..and so?

13% of the American population is black and yet 95% of the national basketball team is black

My point: This is nothing new in sports

Cameroon has 25 millions people but did not qualify for the world cup.


:???: DUH! what does this have to do with the discussion?

The title of the thread
Quote:
African countries need to figure out why they lose talents..

How is France grooming enough talent in a 3.5 millions population of african descent, when Cameroon has 25 millions of them but can not qualify for the world cup.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 12:45 am 
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It's not rocket science. Why are most of us on this forum immigrants living in Canada, the US, UK, Europe, Australia, etc? Its because our countries of origin are basket cases that do not offer much economic opportunity. It just so happens that by immigrating, many Africans gave their kids the opportunity to develop in world class academies that ended up producing the likes of Mbappe, Kante, Pogba, etc etc. These same guys would be nobodies if they were nurtured in Africa because our football programs are a reflection of the continent's dysfunction. If Africa wants to improve its football it must first improve its governance. When it builds strong institutions it will be able to produce strong football powers. Don't hold your breath.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 12:49 am 
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By the way, how many African players have ever become world class by being nurtured in Africa and remaining there throughout their formative years? Historically our very best players had talent but took their game to the next level after being brought over to Europe. We don't have the professionalism, infrastructure, proximity, and competition needed to produce elite players en masse.

France's WC victory is one for them, not Africa. What I'm happy about is France's national team demonstrates the huge value that immigration can bring. Of course the anti-immigrant xenophobes will conveniently ignore this.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 12:53 am 
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Heliopolis wrote:
It's not rocket science. Why are most of us on this forum immigrants living in Canada, the US, UK, Europe, Australia, etc? Its because our countries of origin are basket cases that do not offer much economic opportunity. It just so happens that by immigrating, many Africans gave their kids the opportunity to develop in world class academies that ended up producing the likes of Mbappe, Kante, Pogba, etc etc. These same guys would be nobodies if they were nurtured in Africa because our football programs are a reflection of the continent's dysfunction. If Africa wants to improve its football it must first improve its governance. When it builds strong institutions it will be able to produce strong football powers. Don't hold your breath.


All of this, people look at the sporting success and think solely about improving sporting sectors when it's the entire economic infrastructure that needs the work.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 12:56 am 
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Are we talking about mentorship?
What does this have to do with Virtual mentorship, Entrepreneurship in 2018? How does Jim Crow impact some Cameroonian/Nigerians in USA/Europe mentoring people in Africa and making them better at their jobs/careers? I have had mentors in my career who lived 4 hours flights from me. I have mentored people in Haiti, Uganda, Cameroon, Kenya. And I'm currently mentoring people in Cameroon, Panama. I'm honestly not sure I understand what you are saying.
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
Can you elaborate? Also, if you could give concrete examples of challenges faced ...
Furthermore, I don't believe in the philosophy that things cannot be done... This is defeatism at its best ...
Africans need to stop saying "things can't be done".
Instead they need to ask the question: "How can it be done successfully".
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
I didn't say that we must return home. I said we should strive to create jobs in Africa by leveraging the skills we have specialized in, coupled with entrepreneurship, mentorship, virtual infrastructure.
Bepanda
camex wrote:
bepanda wrote:
The loss of sport talents is extremely minimal compared to the loss of Engineers, Technicians, Doctors, Economics and Financial experts, ... etc.
Here is the real question for Africans: How can Africans, who have gained massive experience in foreign countries (USA, Europe, ... etc) pay Africa back? How can you prevent the next generation of Africans to follow you in Europe and America and therefore continue the brain drain of Africa?
The answer is very simple: Mentorship, Entrepreneurship, Investment in the people who are in Africa.
Most Africans who have lived abroad for let's say 10+ years have built enough expertise in their field, so that they can actually transfer that knowledge back to people in their home countries. As an example: If you understand how to build websites, what prevents you from setting up a business in Cameroon/Nigeria to do the same, then set up an infrastructure in Europe/America to outsource some of these tasks to Africa? How difficult is this really? This can be done in almost every field of work. There are plenty of websites today, where you can create jobs and assign them to experts all over the world. upwork.com is the most popular. The Asian countries are doing it. Why can't African countries do it? We don't need to re-invent the wheels. These jobs can create a solid middle class in Africa, that can help support other things like a football league, housing, ... etc.
It all starts with a middle class that has job opportunities and receives a consistent pay. Not everyone wants to leave Africa to move overseas. But we can't wait for Europeans and Americans to invest in our people. I believe that each and every African in USA/Europe must find a way to start a business, train and mentor talent back home and outsource some of the tasks of his/her business to resources in Africa. It does two things. It provides the talent back home with job and pay. It provides them some work experience, mentorship, training to the same standard and expectations as Europeans/Americans workforces. In addition, these new values (punctuality, responsibility, reliability, high work rate, high quality of work, ...) they learned from working with you can be translated to their daily lives. They can use it to influence their environments and impact change. The real key is how you mentor and manage them. Only demand high standards.
And please don't tell me you need $1M to start a business. You can start a business for less than $100 in every state in the USA.

You forgot an important point. Sacrifice. I remember in the late eighties, reading that there were more Korean engineers going back to Korea than emigrating to the US. I bet those going back were taking a payout, but they did it anyway.

I do not believe virtual mentorship can work in an african context.

There are various examples if you care to look around. For example Houston 5th ward had many black professionals during segregation. When Jim crow ended the professionals all move out of the neighborhood. The role model for the next generation were drug pushers and the like. The economy of the neighborhood has collapsed.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 1:01 am 
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You can't have professionalism if you don't have a strong middle class and a certain set of basic values and standards. Standards of ethics, standards of professionalism, standards of respect, hard work. Basically, the same standards that we have to oblige by, when we live here.
Bepanda
Heliopolis wrote:
By the way, how many African players have ever become world class by being nurtured in Africa and remaining there throughout their formative years? Historically our very best players had talent but took their game to the next level after being brought over to Europe. We don't have the professionalism, infrastructure, proximity, and competition needed to produce elite players en masse.

France's WC victory is one for them, not Africa. What I'm happy about is France's national team demonstrates the huge value that immigration can bring. Of course the anti-immigrant xenophobes will conveniently ignore this.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 4:54 am 
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If those parents had remained in Africa, the Mbappes, the Pogbas, the Kantes might easily be mechanics and roadside touts.

Maybe one or two of them would be the level of a Geremi, but for the most part we wouldn't hear of most of them.

France made them everything they are.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:24 am 
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bepanda wrote:
Are we talking about mentorship?
What does this have to do with Virtual mentorship, Entrepreneurship in 2018? How does Jim Crow impact some Cameroonian/Nigerians in USA/Europe mentoring people in Africa and making them better at their jobs/careers? I have had mentors in my career who lived 4 hours flights from me. I have mentored people in Haiti, Uganda, Cameroon, Kenya. And I'm currently mentoring people in Cameroon, Panama. I'm honestly not sure I understand what you are saying.
Bepanda

I am not saying it is 100% impossible, I am saying it wont lead to significant changes. Mentorships is not solely about the people you talk to. The presence of professionals on the ground play an important for and provide directions to the next generation.This is why I mentioned the 5th ward of Houston, who used to have professionals, the like of Philicia Rashad of Cosby Show, George Foreman, and many professionals.
When I mentioned koreans engineers going back to Korea in the late 80s. The impact was not just technical. Younger koreans see their seniors who have invested their time in education and the pay-off. It gives them directions.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 8:50 am 
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Quote:
[b]Africa is losing its greatest resource. For everyone of us not living in Africa, we are giving the best years of our lives to the country that gave us opportunity of a better life. Our children and grandchildren will follow our path. As we can see from France now, we will with England in time. /b]


Oft found at the polar opposite to this Wengerismisr perspective, one is somewhat surprised to find agreement with the anionic end here. At the close of this debate, the above quote should be entered, read by a silver-haired wise elder with a wrinkly hand placed on the shoulder of a grandchild, both turning to look towards the distance, as the lights fade, before beginning the walk towards the sun. As the silhouette slowly blends into the background, two becomes one and the one remaining grows in stature and is joined by one much smaller than him, before the screen falls black. The end.

Africa is losing that which helps it to advance, purely because, in its present state, it would deny the individual the chance for equal blossom and bloom. The existential crisis of the continent is overlooked by lethargic leaders whose myopia forfeits visual acuity to anything beyond the end of their nose. Africa will forever be behind, forever be developing, never fully developed, for the simple reason that the circle has no start and no ending. Africa, Nigeria for instance, will not do the needy to stop this life cycle of second-class, third worldness (neologism permitted). And what of Geppetto, will he allow this Pinocchio to dance unbound?

The brain drain will continue to deplete the ocean of its talent, leaving behind those less precocious and that which doesn't flush. Theres only so many decades one can look at the same old Nigeria before accepting, but for a philosophical revolution, its never going to happen. Not least in our time.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:42 am 
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Is this French team even Brain Drain?

That is a MASSIVE stretch.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 11:36 am 
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Its not brain drain, rather the produce of economic migration. Long may it continue. History is a tale of opportunists. Even the vikings strapped a few bits of wood together and braved the seas for want of better harvests. If Africa cannot feed its population, let their hunger drive them to lands that can. And should those lands reap the reward, may those rewards shimmer and shine indefinitely.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2018 2:58 pm 
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Tbite wrote:
Is this French team even Brain Drain?

That is a MASSIVE stretch.


Yes it is brain drain. These players are a result of their African parents/grandparents pursuing economic opportunity in Europe. People often assess athletes for their physical abilities but it is their cognitive functions that separate them from the masses. Anyone can learn how to shoot a ball but not anyone can execute the right passes 95% of the time, 70 games a season, against the best players in the world. Imagine having such intelligent players on Egypt, Cameroon, Nigeria, etc.

The role of African immigrants in propelling France to WC glory is yet another reminder of how poor Africa is at providing opportunity to its own people. What I often say to people is look at how African immigrants perform outside of Africa. Here in Canada, and its also the case in other western countries, immigrants from the likes of Egypt, Nigeria, Algeria, Morocco, and other African countries are all professionals (doctors, engineers, pharmacists, entrepreneurs), who are law-abiding, make more money on average than the native-born population, and have climbed the upper echelons of their host societies in a matter of years. Their success should be celebrated but also lamented because Africa could not put their talents to good use. We are obviously focusing on footballers in this discussion but football is a microcosm of the overall problem.


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