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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 10:47 am 
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NFF bans Nigerian coach Salisu Yusuf for taking bribe and also fined the sum of $5,000.

https://guardian.ng/sport/nff-bans-nigerian-coach-salisu-yusuf-for-taking-bribe/

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The Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) has placed a one-year ban from all football-related activities on Super Eagles’ Chief Coach, Salisu Yusuf.

Yusuf was caught on camera collecting bribe from undercover journalists who pretended to be football agents.

The footage, shot by BBC’s Ghanaian reporter Anas Aremeyaw Anas in September 2017, showed Yusuf collecting a handful of money, reportedly, $1000 cash.

In a statement on Wednesday, by the NFF Committee on Ethics and Fair Play, said it considered the complaint by the NFF and the coach’s defence of a video documentary.

However, the coach has also been told to pay a fine of $5,000 to the Federation within three months and also placed a one–year ban from all football-related activities on him.

The NFF, in the statement by its spokesperson, Demola Olajire, said it had accepted the report and approved the committee’s recommendation.

The NFF Committee led by Nuhu Ribadu submitted a report to the NFF Secretariat on Tuesday, days after inviting Salisu to state his own side of the matter.

The committee established that:

1) he accepted the cash gift of $1,000 offered by Tigers Player’s Agency, an undercover reporter, purportedly interested in acting on behalf of Players Osas Okoro and Rabiu Ali, for their inclusion in the list of players for 2018 CHAN Competition in Morocco.

2) it was not an error of judgment on the part of Coach Salisu Yusuf but a conscious and deliberate decision to have accepted the cash gift of $1,000 from the decoy player agent/undercover reporter, purportedly interested in acting on behalf of players Osas Okoro and Rabiu Ali, even though the evidence before the Committee did not establish that his conduct influenced the choice of the two players.

3) the two players could have made the team to 2018 CHAN Competition in Morocco on the basis of their talent and performance.

4) Coach Salisu Yusuf did not accept the offer of 15% of the anticipated transfer fees of the said players, as there was no follow-up action on the promise.

5) the act of the Coach, which was widely published on the British Broadcasting Corporation, has a damaging effect on the reputation and integrity of Nigerian Football, as he ought to have conducted himself more professionally in line with the Code of Conduct signed alongside his Contract with the Nigeria Football Federation, as his conduct in public and in secret should be exemplary, since coaches are role models.

6) the FIFA Code of Ethics, NFF Code of Ethics and FIFA Disciplinary Code, did not contemplate negligence or error of judgment as a defence to violation of any of the provisions as contained therein, as punitive measures must be adopted to serve as deterrent to other intending offenders, even though, that he is a first time offender.

Consequently, the committee’s finalised that “In accordance with Art. 22, FIFA Disciplinary Code, he is hereby banned for the period of one year, from partaking or involvement or participation in any football-related activity, effective from the date of this decision. He is also fined in the sum of $5,000 to be paid within three (3) months of the date of this decision…”

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 11:48 am 
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Fair enough.. But the NFF should gradually disengage him..

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:22 pm 
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Good for him and well done to the NFF. How will pay the fine?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:29 pm 
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chuks69 wrote:
Fair enough.. But the NFF should gradually disengage him..


Dont think he will go back to super eagles after the year ban. big shame to bow out in that manner


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:44 pm 
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Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:24 pm 
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walesvilla wrote:
chuks69 wrote:
Fair enough.. But the NFF should gradually disengage him..


Dont think he will go back to super eagles after the year ban. big shame to bow out in that manner


@walesvilla:

I hope you don't believe this statement you've just made now. Nigeria is a country of no shame and some few Nigerians don't have same, people like Giwa, Adamu and some past military leaders and politicians who have ruled and destroyed Nigeria (by stealing public funds, etc.) still coming back and claiming to want to rule the country again.

So l wouldn't be so sure if Salisu would not be back in the same position or otherwise after the one year ban!!

Cheers

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:42 pm 
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Flex Swift wrote:
Good for him and well done to the NFF. How will pay the fine?

Hehehehehehehe :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: He got caught "red-handed", now even those who are more of a thief are making decision about him. Kai, life is unfair.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:02 pm 
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NFF does the right thing. I do feel for coach Salisu and I believe he can come back from this set-back.

However, I am sad that we celebrate the punishment of a small fish on a modest salary, whereas the really big crooks whose theft is 1000 times more damaging to ordinary Nigerians, walk free everyday.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:05 pm 
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oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:11 pm 
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Next wrote:
walesvilla wrote:
chuks69 wrote:
Fair enough.. But the NFF should gradually disengage him..


Dont think he will go back to super eagles after the year ban. big shame to bow out in that manner


@walesvilla:

I hope you don't believe this statement you've just made now. Nigeria is a country of no shame and some few Nigerians don't have same, people like Giwa, Adamu and some past military leaders and politicians who have ruled and destroyed Nigeria (by stealing public funds, etc.) still coming back and claiming to want to rule the country again.

So l wouldn't be so sure if Salisu would not be back in the same position or otherwise after the one year ban!!

Cheers
The kind of people you mentioned have power. They elude, cheat and ridicule justice.
Salisu has no such power.
In case you didn't know, only the poor man pays for his crimes in Nigeria. On the other hand, he hardly ever gets justice. 'Justice' and injustice dressed up as justice in naira notes are for the big boyz.

So I doubt whether Salisu will be back.
We'll see.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:34 pm 
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Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.


Utter nonsense. Westerners are worse than us when it comes to corruption.
They are only more sophisticated at it.

And in-spite of their hypocritical grandstanding, they have the same issues we face. The truly wealthy always avoid punishment, no matter what they do. Only the plebs and puppets get punished.

That compassion you want us to discard, is one of our strengths. It is the reason why our parents dont wither away in nursing homes, or why inspite of the severe poverty we endure, we still find ways to thrive.

Salisu Yusuf made a mistake and is paying his price (a just one). Dont be too quick to discard him.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:44 pm 
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charlie wrote:
NFF does the right thing. I do feel for coach Salisu and I believe he can come back from this set-back.

However, I am sad that we celebrate the punishment of a small fish on a modest salary, whereas the really big crooks whose theft is 1000 times more damaging to ordinary Nigerians, walk free everyday.

... and that is exactly how I feel and said in above

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:45 pm 
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charlie wrote:
Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.


Utter nonsense. Westerners are worse than us when it comes to corruption.
They are only more sophisticated at it.

And in-spite of their hypocritical grandstanding, they have the same issues we face. The truly wealthy always avoid punishment, no matter what they do. Only the plebs and puppets get punished.

That compassion you want us to discard, is one of our strengths. It is the reason why our parents dont wither away in nursing homes, or why inspite of the severe poverty we endure, we still find ways to thrive.

Salisu Yusuf made a mistake and is paying his price (a just one). Dont be too quick to discard him.


Charlie, on behalf of Damunk, I think you miss his point. Society should have compassion, on that I agree. However, when it comes to crime, while we have compassion for those who make mistake and are sorry, the concept of consequences is compassionless and should be, in order to root out evil in society. I hope this unsolicited explanation helps. For example, here in the UK, i find the Police interaction with say drunken drivers and those without insurance on TV interesting. With very polite yes Sir many times, they jejely issue the relevant fine and tickets. Its the way it should be. Its why the law is presented blindfolded. Nevertheless, you are right that neither the West nor Nigeria are a paragon of Justice, and everywhere, those who can afford it - pay for "justice". This however does not remove that a "compassionless approach" to consequence management is the way forward. It is well encapsulated in the phrase; " do the crime, do the time". The defence rest :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:59 pm 
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Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.

The whole essence of punishment is to make people change their ways and not to destroy them, and that is why even in the oyinbo courts the judges are lenient towards first offenders. He made a mistake a bad mistake and has been punished . The message has been passed,I do not pity him because of the ban,I pity because of a promising career probably pissed away. I hope he finds redemption somewhere down the road.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:00 pm 
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GG of G wrote:
charlie wrote:
Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.


Utter nonsense. Westerners are worse than us when it comes to corruption.
They are only more sophisticated at it.

And in-spite of their hypocritical grandstanding, they have the same issues we face. The truly wealthy always avoid punishment, no matter what they do. Only the plebs and puppets get punished.

That compassion you want us to discard, is one of our strengths. It is the reason why our parents dont wither away in nursing homes, or why inspite of the severe poverty we endure, we still find ways to thrive.

Salisu Yusuf made a mistake and is paying his price (a just one). Dont be too quick to discard him.


Charlie, on behalf of Damunk, I think you miss his point. Society should have compassion, on that I agree. However, when it comes to crime, while we have compassion for those who make mistake and are sorry, the concept of consequences is compassionless and should be, in order to root out evil in society. I hope this unsolicited explanation helps. For example, here in the UK, i find the Police interaction with say drunken drivers and those without insurance on TV interesting. With very polite yes Sir many times, they jejely issue the relevant fine and tickets. Its the way it should be. Its why the law is presented blindfolded. Nevertheless, you are right that neither the West nor Nigeria are a paragon of Justice, and everywhere, those who can afford it - pay for "justice". This however does not remove that a "compassionless approach" to consequence management is the way forward. It is well encapsulated in the phrase; " do the crime, do the time". The defence rest :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



I totally get what you are saying as I have said previously, the NFF is right in their punishment of Coach Salisu. Crime must be punished no matter who is responsible. However, lack of compassion in our punishment would lead us down the same path Western countries have taken.

Look at the people filling their prisons. It is not their biggest or most dangerous criminals. It is their minorities and poor. I dont know much about the UK but how many people in the US have 10+ year sentences for carrying marijuana while White collar criminals that steal millions or in some cases billions in peoples pensions or savings or investments, pay their fines and walk out the next day? Is that blind justice??

My own is simple. While we should punish crimes, we should not be quick to copy western values when it comes to justice.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:12 pm 
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Why is he being fined in $ not Naira?

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:24 pm 
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EMIR KONGI JAFFI JOFFA wrote:
Why is he being fined in $ not Naira?

Because he chopulate in dollars.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:38 pm 
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charlie wrote:
GG of G wrote:
charlie wrote:
Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.


Utter nonsense. Westerners are worse than us when it comes to corruption.
They are only more sophisticated at it.

And in-spite of their hypocritical grandstanding, they have the same issues we face. The truly wealthy always avoid punishment, no matter what they do. Only the plebs and puppets get punished.

That compassion you want us to discard, is one of our strengths. It is the reason why our parents dont wither away in nursing homes, or why inspite of the severe poverty we endure, we still find ways to thrive.

Salisu Yusuf made a mistake and is paying his price (a just one). Dont be too quick to discard him.


Charlie, on behalf of Damunk, I think you miss his point. Society should have compassion, on that I agree. However, when it comes to crime, while we have compassion for those who make mistake and are sorry, the concept of consequences is compassionless and should be, in order to root out evil in society. I hope this unsolicited explanation helps. For example, here in the UK, i find the Police interaction with say drunken drivers and those without insurance on TV interesting. With very polite yes Sir many times, they jejely issue the relevant fine and tickets. Its the way it should be. Its why the law is presented blindfolded. Nevertheless, you are right that neither the West nor Nigeria are a paragon of Justice, and everywhere, those who can afford it - pay for "justice". This however does not remove that a "compassionless approach" to consequence management is the way forward. It is well encapsulated in the phrase; " do the crime, do the time". The defence rest :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



I totally get what you are saying as I have said previously, the NFF is right in their punishment of Coach Salisu. Crime must be punished no matter who is responsible. However, lack of compassion in our punishment would lead us down the same path Western countries have taken.

Look at the people filling their prisons. It is not their biggest or most dangerous criminals. It is their minorities and poor. I dont know much about the UK but how many people in the US have 10+ year sentences for carrying marijuana while White collar criminals that steal millions or in some cases billions in peoples pensions or savings or investments, pay their fines and walk out the next day? Is that blind justice??

My own is simple. While we should punish crimes, we should not be quick to copy western values when it comes to justice.
So we are not in total disagreement and therefore there was no need for you to jump in with your 'utter nonsense' statement.

When I responded to that post earlier, I was sitting in a court's witness waiting room for an assault case in which I was to give testimony for the prosecution, so I couldn't respond in full. A young lady had been beaten black and blue by her partner and she had taken him to court. I had examined her on the day of the assault.

I sat there bored waiting to be called and logged on to CE. First thread I read was Oloye's post about "feeling sorry" for Salisu - a statement he has further clarified.

Here I was sitting there wondering how if this case had been in Nigeria, people would beg the girl to 'forgive' and forget the crime. Church people will pressure her to show compassion because 'God will judge'. Her own family will tell her that she shouldn't throw away a future marriage partner and the guy's family will plead that it was 'the devil'.

Even when the crime ends in terrible tragedy - like murder - you will still hear the victim's family arguing that nothing will bring the diseased person back and they should therefore drop the case and 'leave the rest to God'.

So it is this all-pervasive mindset that I am referring to.
Justice gets circumvented and future crimes are perpetuated every time people allow compassion to overcome their desire to seek full justice for a crime. I am part of the problem, don't get me wrong, because this thing is cultural. My childminder that was virtually murdered a few weeks ago by her brothers by keeping her for weeks in a church until she entered into a coma, should, in my opinion, be prosecuted. But I too have since started "feeling sorry for them" and their ignorance, and I am now more inclined to reach out to them to 'enlighten' them.
But it really doesn't help the larger society because society is robbed of seeing the consequences of such ignorance and arrogance.

Justice is nothing if society does not see it administered regularly, consistently and fairly.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:54 pm 
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GG of G wrote:
charlie wrote:
Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.


Utter nonsense. Westerners are worse than us when it comes to corruption.
They are only more sophisticated at it.

And in-spite of their hypocritical grandstanding, they have the same issues we face. The truly wealthy always avoid punishment, no matter what they do. Only the plebs and puppets get punished.

That compassion you want us to discard, is one of our strengths. It is the reason why our parents dont wither away in nursing homes, or why inspite of the severe poverty we endure, we still find ways to thrive.

Salisu Yusuf made a mistake and is paying his price (a just one). Dont be too quick to discard him.


Charlie, on behalf of Damunk, I think you miss his point. Society should have compassion, on that I agree. However, when it comes to crime, while we have compassion for those who make mistake and are sorry, the concept of consequences is compassionless and should be, in order to root out evil in society. I hope this unsolicited explanation helps. For example, here in the UK, i find the Police interaction with say drunken drivers and those without insurance on TV interesting. With very polite yes Sir many times, they jejely issue the relevant fine and tickets. Its the way it should be. Its why the law is presented blindfolded. Nevertheless, you are right that neither the West nor Nigeria are a paragon of Justice, and everywhere, those who can afford it - pay for "justice". This however does not remove that a "compassionless approach" to consequence management is the way forward. It is well encapsulated in the phrase; " do the crime, do the time". The defence rest :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
It helps greatly and accurately captures what I was getting at.
Thanks. :thumb:

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:57 pm 
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oloye wrote:
Damunk wrote:
oloye wrote:
Cannot help but feel sorry for the guy....he had a promising career before him until that midget bounty hunter showed up with the evil carrot.
We have to become more like oyibo - compassionless when a crime has been commited.
There's far too much compassion in our society. Its why we literally let people get away with murder. It sounds callous but society can only move forward when we stop letting people get away with both the big things and the small things.

The whole essence of punishment is to make people change their ways and not to destroy them, and that is why even in the oyinbo courts the judges are lenient towards first offenders. He made a mistake a bad mistake and has been punished . The message has been passed,I do not pity him because of the ban, I pity because of a promising career probably pissed away. I hope he finds redemption somewhere down the road.
I get you now. :thumb:

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 7:13 pm 
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Damunk, first of all, I apologize for the "utter nonsense" comment I made earlier.
It was uncalled for, and came from my personal passion and life story when it comes to my experience of Western Justice. Please accept my apologies.

I think we have to start by agreeing on what we mean by compassion when it comes to punishment first and foremost.

In my opinion, Justice without empathy is simply revenge, which is also a crime on society.

True compassion is not ignoring a crime or allowing the guilty to go unpunished. It is understanding the causes behind a crime and then applying a punishment that ultimately serves the best interests of the offended parties, the guilty, and above all, society. True justice seeks balance, not retribution.

In coach Salisu's case, I believe the interests of society have been served in his punishment. He accepted a $1000 bribe and in return, he has been disgraced, his livelyhood is in jeorpady and his story serves as a deterrent to others. Anything more than this, including a lifetime ban in a job he is good at, is excessive and is not in the interest of society. He should be given a chance to rebuild his life and livelyhood after serving his punishment. That for me is what I call compassion and empathy in justice and I think it has been served here.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 7:42 pm 
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charlie wrote:
Damunk, first of all, I apologize for the "utter nonsense" comment I made earlier.
It was uncalled for, and came from my personal passion and life story when it comes to my experience of Western Justice. Please accept my apologies.

I think we have to start by agreeing on what we mean by compassion when it comes to punishment first and foremost.

In my opinion, Justice without empathy is simply revenge, which is also a crime on society.

True compassion is not ignoring a crime or allowing the guilty to go unpunished. It is understanding the causes behind a crime and then applying a punishment that ultimately serves the best interests of the offended parties, the guilty, and above all, society. True justice seeks balance, not retribution.

In coach Salisu's case, I believe the interests of society have been served in his punishment. He accepted a $1000 bribe and in return, he has been disgraced, his livelyhood is in jeorpady and his story serves as a deterrent to others. Anything more than this, including a lifetime ban in a job he is good at, is excessive and is not in the interest of society. He should be given a chance to rebuild his life and livelyhood after serving his punishment. That for me is what I call compassion and empathy in justice and I think it has been served here.



Charlie,

I think you and Damunk are saying similar things and I am in agreement. Consider the weight of the crime when punishment is meted. I think one of our problems is, however, the tendency to always forgive even when a crime is grave. That should never be acceptable because it encourages crime. What we should seek is to deter, as much as possible, future crimes.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:25 pm 
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EMIR KONGI JAFFI JOFFA wrote:
Why is he being fined in $ not Naira?


....he collected the bribe in $.


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