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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:36 am 
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Gooner1 wrote:
pajimoh wrote:
Chief Ogbunigwe wrote:
pajimoh wrote:
The second pen to Tanzania should have been a free kick. Our keeper is useless at penalties



Most keepers are useless at penalties

this one no even pick ball wey just pass beside him. It's like he's given up in his mind of saving the pens. Look at the first one, it hit the post and even get time come hit the goalkeeper for leg before ball roll in. The second one just stroll pass him, the ball even "mssshhheew" at the goalkeeper as it waka go inside net.

:rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:


:rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: pajimoh is something else

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:15 am 
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bret- hart wrote:
maceo4 wrote:
Damunk wrote:
JACKAL wrote:
maceo4 wrote:
No kill me o, I just dey ask question but have these guys gone through the age testing scans? I hate to follow U-Anything, but NFF posted the pic of the no. 13 Amoo guy with MOTM award and he doesn’t look U-17 to me. Just asking o...

The standards that FIFA set is that you have to pass the MRI test to qualify for the tournament… On my personal count, he has been tested 4 times and he has passed each time...2x by Nigerian testers and 2x times by CAF independent testers once in Burkina faso and as recently as last week in Tanzania.....I am not sure what else you want ? :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

I am personally satisfied with the players, especially since they were all independently tested.
This is the kid he is doubting can be 17 yrs old.




And that's him again in their group photo, third from left, front row:



Yea doesn’t look like a 17 year old to me, but if he’s been through scans then wetin be my own sef, I was just enquiring.



He looks like a 17 year old kid. Go to any high school in your local area and you will see athletes(basketball and Football players) that look even older. He did like 4 MRI tests and passed them all. What more proof do you want? Im sick of clowns like you that accuse these kids of being overaged without any logical evidence to back any claims up.


You are being over dramatic for no reason. I was merely inquiring as he didn't look U-17 to me. I asked if he passed the scans, they told me yes, so I said ok and dropped it. What more do you want? You think with our history people aren't allowed to ask questions? Its clowns like YOU that try to stifle simple questioning and discussions that YOU should be sick of. You try to perpetuate the status quo and never question anything in your life like a simpleton soldier. Anyways, carry on, I asked an innocent question, it was answered and I kept it moving after I got the 'logical evidence' you were speaking of, but you want to question my ability to ask questions? I mean WTF, anyways...

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 5:28 am 
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Good win from the Golden Eaglets. All the goals scored were seriously legit. The team looks much better than the team that won the regional competition in Niger.

As for the ageologists and their palava. Either you provide proof that a child is over age, or take your issues and go sidon. No matter what these boys do or what tests they are made to pass, you will never be satisfied because you know cheating is in your nature, so you expect it from everyone else.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 6:04 am 
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txj wrote:
Damunk wrote:
txj wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
Txj,

Now you are talking. You finally got to the point.

1. I agree with you that African countries should exercise their legal rights but I also agree that they cannot because of a history of age cheating and, thus, they cannot vouch for their documents and must, therefore, be subject to MRI tests used for age estimation. I 100% agree! :thumbs:

2. On Maduabuchi, you are actually the one who uses his case severally to claim falsification of MRI data. The point, however, is that the MRI data on Maduabuchi does not need to be falsified. The MRI may have shown him as over age whereas we both know that with his birth certificate that he is IN FACT within the age group. The problem though is that even with his birth cert he would have been disqualified not only by NFF but by CAF as well. Yet, if he played for the USA, MRI would be only used at the World Cup U17 level and even if he failed the test at that point, his birth cert would have made him eligible because he would be representing the USA. That is the point.

I am happy that you now truly understand the issues. Having even accurate birth certifications by African kids is not enough to get them eligible any longer. Those days are past because of the history of their age cheating. Thus, only MRI is now used inspite of its errors. That is the point that was always made and yet it never was understood. Glad that you are finally there.



You are quite funny!

There is nothing new about my statement or position.

Having accurate BC should and can be enough for Nigerian players if the NFF were not collusive in cheating.And its not that they cannot vouch for the documents. They can if they truly wanted... its that they are collusive in the cheating in the first place, and continue to do so, even as we speak! That is the point you repeatedly gloss over...

If they were not collusive in the cheating, they would move hell and highwater to challenge CAF's regulation, which has no basis in law.
You are so concrete-headed its unbelievable.
This your virtue signaling impresses nobody.

But let's assume you are the only morally upright person left in Nigeria and are put in charge of screening and 'vouching for/verifying/validating' (or whatever you choose to call it) BCs.
You think everyone will now pass the MRI test?
Or you think FIFA will scrap the need for it in Nigeria because Saint Txj is doing the 'vouching'?

What has your freaking 'vouching' got to do with the stark reality of birth registrations in Nigeria?
You are a joker and have no clue.


First off, FIFA does not and have never disqualified anyone on account of MRI...

You should at least get the basics right...
If you were so good at getting the basics right yourself you'd quickly notice there was nowhere I spoke about FIFA ''disqualifying'' anybody.
I spoke about FIFA 'scrapping the MRI' in a very hypothetical situation in which you were the last morally upright saint standing, as you like to imply.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 6:53 am 
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https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 7:42 am 
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Rawlings wrote:
1naija wrote:
Tobi17 wrote:
That Nigerian goal keeper is very bad... but boy those were some phenomenal goals, especially the last one from the Nigerian kid :clap:


The Tanzanian goal keeper was very good, but still chopped 5 goals ...


A boy taking shots from men.
what do u expect?


When u come to Nigeria you observe that we don’t need over aged players to win tournaments. There are kids playing football every where , with academies in the hundreds. Even The elites send there kids to academies in Lagos and other states

With a pollution like ours talents abound, so no need to think these kids ar overages , they are from hard back grounds and look that way.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 8:47 am 
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okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.
Thanks for this Okidoki.
This is information that some people just can't - and won't - get through their thick, reinforced concrete domes they call skulls.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 10:07 am 
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Damunk wrote:
okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.
Thanks for this Okidoki.
This is information that some people just can't - and won't - get through their thick, reinforced concrete domes they call skulls.

You know I don't like your futile excersise when you take stick dey beat around bush and bush dey laff. A beg beat bush well well Jo. Na txj be the concrete block head with degrees :tic: :taunt:

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 10:28 am 
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pajimoh wrote:
Damunk wrote:
okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.
Thanks for this Okidoki.
This is information that some people just can't - and won't - get through their thick, reinforced concrete domes they call skulls.

You know I don't like your futile excersise when you take stick dey beat around bush and bush dey laff. A beg beat bush well well Jo. Na txj be the concrete block head with degrees :tic: :taunt:
:ohmy: :ohmy: :ohmy:
Me, I'm not there o. :P

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 10:34 am 
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Damunk wrote:
pajimoh wrote:
Damunk wrote:
okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.
Thanks for this Okidoki.
This is information that some people just can't - and won't - get through their thick, reinforced concrete domes they call skulls.

You know I don't like your futile excersise when you take stick dey beat around bush and bush dey laff. A beg beat bush well well Jo. Na txj be the concrete block head with degrees :tic: :taunt:
:ohmy: :ohmy: :ohmy:
Me, I'm not there o. :P

No be only concrete head txj get. Check his terrazzo skin too. Bobo can take it :tic: :D

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:32 pm 
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Damunk wrote:
txj wrote:
Damunk wrote:
txj wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
Txj,

Now you are talking. You finally got to the point.

1. I agree with you that African countries should exercise their legal rights but I also agree that they cannot because of a history of age cheating and, thus, they cannot vouch for their documents and must, therefore, be subject to MRI tests used for age estimation. I 100% agree! :thumbs:

2. On Maduabuchi, you are actually the one who uses his case severally to claim falsification of MRI data. The point, however, is that the MRI data on Maduabuchi does not need to be falsified. The MRI may have shown him as over age whereas we both know that with his birth certificate that he is IN FACT within the age group. The problem though is that even with his birth cert he would have been disqualified not only by NFF but by CAF as well. Yet, if he played for the USA, MRI would be only used at the World Cup U17 level and even if he failed the test at that point, his birth cert would have made him eligible because he would be representing the USA. That is the point.

I am happy that you now truly understand the issues. Having even accurate birth certifications by African kids is not enough to get them eligible any longer. Those days are past because of the history of their age cheating. Thus, only MRI is now used inspite of its errors. That is the point that was always made and yet it never was understood. Glad that you are finally there.



You are quite funny!

There is nothing new about my statement or position.

Having accurate BC should and can be enough for Nigerian players if the NFF were not collusive in cheating.And its not that they cannot vouch for the documents. They can if they truly wanted... its that they are collusive in the cheating in the first place, and continue to do so, even as we speak! That is the point you repeatedly gloss over...

If they were not collusive in the cheating, they would move hell and highwater to challenge CAF's regulation, which has no basis in law.
You are so concrete-headed its unbelievable.
This your virtue signaling impresses nobody.

But let's assume you are the only morally upright person left in Nigeria and are put in charge of screening and 'vouching for/verifying/validating' (or whatever you choose to call it) BCs.
You think everyone will now pass the MRI test?
Or you think FIFA will scrap the need for it in Nigeria because Saint Txj is doing the 'vouching'?

What has your freaking 'vouching' got to do with the stark reality of birth registrations in Nigeria?
You are a joker and have no clue.


First off, FIFA does not and have never disqualified anyone on account of MRI...

You should at least get the basics right...
If you were so good at getting the basics right yourself you'd quickly notice there was nowhere I spoke about FIFA ''disqualifying'' anybody.
I spoke about FIFA 'scrapping the MRI' in a very hypothetical situation in which you were the last morally upright saint standing, as you like to imply.



The MRI as an eligibility measure for participation in the U-17s is not a FIFA stipulation...

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We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:34 pm 
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okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.



Everytime this issue comes up, someone typically posts a story on Nigerian birth registration. The fact you think that you are making a serious point is quite worrisome...

_________________
Image
Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 5:31 pm 
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okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.


Okidoki,

Thank you for posting this. This provides needed information on how complicated the age issue is in our country. One good note from the story is that there appears to be a semblance of improvement although the figures continue to be quite poor.

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The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2019 10:57 pm 
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okidoki wrote:
https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nigeria-registers-more-children-at-birth-unicef/


Nigeria registers more children at birth – UNICEF ON APRIL 15, 20193:35 PMIN NEWS0 COMMENTS The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says the number of children between the ages of zero and 17 years registered in Nigeria increased by 29 million. UNICEF made this known following a birth registration evaluation report released on Monday. According to UNICEF, the birth registration programme was implemented by the National Population Commission (NPopC) with support from UNICEF. UNICEF Representative in Nigeria, Mr Mohamed Fall, said the report showed that for children under one year of age, the programme increased by more than 100 per cent the number of children registered; that is, from 3 million in 2012 to 11 million in 2016. “Low rates of birth registration is a challenge in Nigeria. “In 2011, the birth registration rate was 41 per cent, which means that three in every five children were not registered. “This lack of birth registration negatively affects a child’s ability to access his or her right to health care, education and many other rights. “It is in this context that the programme was initiated to accelerate birth registration rates, particularly for children under the age of five, between 2012 and 2016, ‘’ he said. Fall said that the programme made significant improvements in strengthening the birth registration system in Nigeria. According to him, at the level of infrastructure, the numbers of NPopC Registrars/Centres increased to nearly 4,000 in 2016 from about 3,000 in 2012. “This helped to achieve a harmonised, accessible and efficient birth registration system, which now functions as an integral part of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) in Nigeria. “The programme’s use of ICT tools for birth registration introduced target-driven performance in all of the 774 local government areas in Nigeria. “The LGAs now have specified targets, reports and performance ranking,’’ he said. The representative said NPopC has been urged as a primary service provider, to take greater ownership and a proactive approach on registration of newborn children and all other children who are still unregistered. “NPopC is advised to prioritise digitisation, advocacy and lobbying for more funds to effectively implement the Strategic CRVS Plan between 2018 and 2022. “Birth registration remains pivotal to child wellbeing in Nigeria. “Overall survey results, as part of the evaluation, indicate that nearly half of the survey respondents perceived that an increase in birth registration can help reduce child rights violations,’’ Fall said. The Deputy Representative, UNICEF Nigeria, Ms Pernille Ironside, said that birth registration was a critical part of UNICEF’s four pillars of child rights programming including survival, development, protection and participation. Family planning does not cause infertility, fibroid — Dr Farouk Jega Ironside said that UNICEF had been working with the Federal Government to address systemic bottlenecks that impede birth registration, with a view to achieving sustainable results for children. “We sought this independent impact evaluation of UNICEF Nigeria’s Birth Registration Programme because we wanted to know what worked and perhaps what didn’t work as well in our efforts to strengthen the birth registration system in Nigeria. “What we found was that Nigeria’s rapid population growth requires stronger efforts to ensure that birth registration can keep pace with that growth, especially in the under-five population. “This finding points us in the right direction for our future work on this important issue and our work to deliver results for children and change children’s lives for the better,’’ she said.

Read more at: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/04/nig ... th-unicef/


To those accusing NFF of being complicit in age cheating, please read article carefully. 2011 birth registration was 46%. Imagine what it was 2002, when the oldest of this present team was supposed to have been born. Many slip into the group of the, unregistered by no fault of their own.
Its even worse in the North, were most births are at home.
My sister runs a medical mission, and has a clinic that's charity based. Some of the things you hear folks go through, will blow your righteous mind. I have seen people die from Malaria, go blind from easily treatable issues.
Nigeria isn't a bed, of roses. We have really serious issues, and we are on the lower rungs of the third world country index in investment in Healthcare and education.
Please lets get the facts, before throwing stones, Nigeria has serious issues.



Lots of good reasons to support we are doing better with age cheats but this registration birth thing is not one of them. Yes health care is poor but even if all the kids in Nigeria are registered at birth age cheating can and will still occur. Why should it matter how many were registered at birth when all one has to do is bribe someone to get another birth certificate. We all know any of us can change our date of birth easily especially before that first passport and even after that. For the kid in question, a bit unfair to judge him by his looks. He has passed two MRI tests that most of the age cheats (and a few younger folks fail) and that hurdle was put in specifically put in place and he passed


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