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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 7:06 am 
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pajimoh wrote:
Prince wrote:
pajimoh wrote:
Brighton did not fire their manager because he is black. I'm they know he's black when they hired him. White managers have been sacked based on results. Leicester city manager who took them to the title did not last. I can name a few. Brighton surved because the 3 that went down were just so poor. Houghton can hold his head high that he kept the team up and thank his lucky stars that they gave him time to do it.

He brought them up, Dyche and Howe for faced the same issue, they were backed and continue to be backed


Please lets be honest and stop screaming racism. He brought them up is not a guarantee of a lifetime job. Ranieri won a title and he did not last. Maurinho did not last. Conte did not last. Dyche and Howe did not just manage to survive.

If Houghton was white and he got the sack non of you will bat an eye lid. He's been treated like any other manager. Black peopl cannot keep shouting racism all the time. Brighton gave him a job and he's been with them at least 4 years. Why shout racism now? Look at his woes in the league. The league is bread and butter, not the FA cup. Even lower league teams play in the FA cup


Pajimoh - he brought them up using a Brighton team which had very average players. The second season in the EPL is often the toughest. I am not screaming racism. However I am shaking my head at the chairman - He is comparing himself to Wolves or is it Watford? They are also going for Graham Potter, the Swansea manager. It is their choice, pah. Bournemouth gave Howe proper backing and so did Burnley to Dyche.

I wish Hughton the best in his future role.

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 7:32 am 
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Anyone who manages a low budget team that is promoted to the EPL is on a hiding to nothing. Teams become more ambitious as they see the kind of money they may lose. They do not consider their resources but rather think they can get blood from a stone.
As for managers getting sacked, how many times in the past have we said someone was sacked too soon, or should have been sacked earlier?
It pains me that Houghton is gone and I can only wish the manner he's distinguished himself, would lead to another and better gig. But in all honesty If he was white, I wouldn't think he's been treated unfairly. That is my yardstick

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 10:41 am 
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Many of you don't understand how racism works. Sometimes racists give a black person a job - usually when they are desperate. And then you are expected to make a silk purse from a pig's ear. You won't get the credit when the results are good and get all the blame for bad results.

Quote:
Cowardly Brighton throw a good man in Chris Hughton onto the street

henry winter, chief football writer

In between exhaling after that breathtaking title race and the excitement of looking forward to the announcement of next season’s Premier League fixtures on June 13 (9am sharp, can’t wait), the heart sank at the brutal bulletin from Brighton & Hove Albion that they have sacked their manager, Chris Hughton, a decent man in a dirty trade.

Perfidious Albion? Come on, Brighton are better than this, the timing let alone the decision. Brighton pride themselves on their principles, negotiating sure-footed passage through the swamp of the modern, scruple-free national game.

Look at the banners around the Amex Stadium, the notices on the wall underlining the behaviour they expect, the need to respect everybody. Well, managers deserve respect, too.

Hughton embodied values many associate with Brighton, integrity and inclusivity for starters. He is more than a mere man who stands in a dugout, directing operations. The 60-year-old represents qualities the game desperately needs: determination, uprightness, compassion. A quiet dignity defines him. A spin through his career shows what a special man he is, and what an important, inspiring individual Brighton have just ushered out on to the street.

The son of an Irish mother and Ghanaian father, Hughton was born in Forest Gate, east London, and when he began making his way as an energetic, intelligent left back for Tottenham Hotspur in the late Seventies, he suffered racist abuse from the opposition, occasionally “half a stand chanting at me”. Hughton ignored them. He endured poisonous remarks from opposing players. He didn’t complain, simply making sure “the next tackle went in a bit firmer”, as he once told me.

Grace under pressure characterises him. Hughton should be celebrated as one of football’s finest role models, an example for aspiring managers of how to build a career, taking his time and doing his apprenticeship, learning under everyone from Keith Burkinshaw to Ossie Ardiles, Glenn Hoddle to David Pleat and Martin Jol at Spurs. Brighton have just dispensed with a lot of experience.

On smashing through what Cyrille Regis always called the “glass ceiling” for black coaches wanting to break into management, Hughton won manager-of-the month awards in three of his first four months at Newcastle United. He got them promoted, got Andy Carroll performing consistently, and when he was eventually fired by Mike Ashley with the team 11th in the Premier League, fans demonstrated outside St James’ Park. He was replaced by Alan Pardew. That hardly worked out triumphantly.

On he went after Newcastle, steering Birmingham City into the Championship play-offs, helping to nurture Nathan Redmond and the on-loan Andros Townsend, and so grounded that he hosted a table at the club’s Christmas party in 2011 and invited kit men and groundstaff as his guests. Class.

It needs acknowledging that Hughton’s time at Norwich City from 2012 to 2014 is not remembered overly fondly by fans. Even amid his darkest hour at Carrow Road, he willingly agreed to interviews, and I remember talking to him at length about Norwich’s plight and he was hurting deeply, stressed by his failure to inspire the team. Hughton cares. He respects employers and supporters, and frets when he cannot deliver value.

This was the only occasion that I heard him raise his voice and that was after he discovered me at Colney Training Centre conducting an (he thought) unauthorised interview with Grant Holt. Far from full Fergie hairdryer, Hughton still made his dissatisfaction abundantly clear. He had issues with the striker at the time and the whole tension essentially boiled down to his wanting the best for the team. It’s never about him with Hughton. He doesn’t possess an ego.

Kindness runs through him. When Jonás Gutiérrez sought matches after recovering from testicular cancer at Newcastle, Hughton took his old player on loan to Carrow Road in 2014. Hughton was motivated mainly because of Gutiérrez’s ability but also by empathy.

Seven months after being sent packing by Norwich, he began galvanising Brighton, eventually getting them promoted to the Premier League and keeping them there, helping to generate more than £200 million from TV and prize money in two seasons. He was praised for his management, and also as a wonderful ambassador for the club.

After winning away to Ipswich Town shortly after the Shoreham air disaster in 2015, Hughton dedicated victory to two of the victims, Matt Grimstone, a member of the club’s groundstaff, and supporter Jacob Schilt. When Anthony Knockaert’s father died in 2016, Hughton called off training and organised for the players to travel over to near Lille for the funeral, showing their support for a grieving team-mate.

All the while, Hughton has been a beacon of hope for coaches who craved becoming No 1s, for black managers rightly concerned about the glass ceiling, for home-grown managers and those who have taken the long road.
Hughton is obviously a capable manager and it was scarcely two years ago that the FA chairman Greg Clarke backed him to potentially take charge of England. “Why not?” Clarke told The Times. “It would be wonderful to see a black England manager. It would put us forward 20 years.”

Hughton lifted Brighton even higher than mere elevation from the Championship into the Premier League. He placed them on the pantheon as a club that judged human beings on quality not ethnicity.

The perception of Brighton has always been of a club with a conscience, of fans finding ways to keep their cherished institution alive, fighting off the charlatans who would drag them down, pinch their land, threaten their birth-right. Hughton is too modest to say it, even think it, but he bestowed moral substance on Brighton. They will miss that.

Everyone who comes into contact with him instinctively warms to him. Fans find him willingly spending as long as required to satisfy selfie and autograph requests. Media from across the globe would visit Brighton’s splendid Lancing training retreat, as well as the Amex, and discovered to their delight a manager of a Premier League side welcoming and helpful. A manager with manners.

Even for those of us popping in to Lancing for an interview with a player would be invited over for a brief chat. How are you? How are the children? Hughton is a good man, as well as manager. Brighton have lost their greatest calling card.

If offspring truly reflect parenting skills, then Hughton can be particularly proud. When the Tube packed up the night of the Kick It Out 25th anniversary dinner at Stamford Bridge in February, a group of us were jettisoned at Earl’s Court. Hughton’s daughter, Aisha, kindly signalled to climb into her Uber. Chatty and friendly, she enthused about how much her father loved Brighton, the city and the club. Brighton was more than a job for Hughton, it was a passion.

We reached the Bridge in good time to hear Aisha’s father speak powerfully about how much the game had to do in combating racism. As the night closed, and Hughton needed to head south, he happily made the delayed journey to the door, stopping to talk to his many friends and admirers. That’s Chris. Decent. That’s why those who know him are so outraged by Brighton’s decision. They have let a good man go.

Brighton will argue that this was a decision carefully thought through. They can politely point out that Hughton’s side have been in a tailspin for most of 2019, taking three points from 27, and clinging to elite status only because of the incompetence of Huddersfield Town, Fulham and Cardiff City. Brighton’s owner, Tony Bloom, is neither uncaring nor imprudent and his ambitious new technical director, Dan Ashworth, the man who effectively appointed Gareth Southgate with England, is certainly no trigger-happy fool.

If Bloom and Ashworth can prise Graham Potter from Swansea City, then some sense will be conferred retrospectively on a seemingly callous decision, assuming that Potter’s desire for expansive football with, respectfully, average players does not see Brighton ripped apart.

At the very least, Hughton deserved a few days to bask in his achievement of keeping Brighton up, the principal demand from the club. Bloom and Ashworth waited only until the show was over, the media circus had moved on, and those fans supportive of Hughton did not have a match-day platform to chorus their disapproval. The timing is cowardly, even if Bloom and Ashworth can defend the decision itself. As a man and a manager, Hughton deserved better.


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/cowa ... -t9wdwx8zd

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 11:17 am 
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cic old boy wrote:
Many of you don't understand how racism works. Sometimes racists give a black person a job - usually when they are desperate. And then you are expected to make a silk purse from a pig's ear. You won't get the credit when the results are good and get all the blame for bad results.

Quote:
Cowardly Brighton throw a good man in Chris Hughton onto the street

henry winter, chief football writer

In between exhaling after that breathtaking title race and the excitement of looking forward to the announcement of next season’s Premier League fixtures on June 13 (9am sharp, can’t wait), the heart sank at the brutal bulletin from Brighton & Hove Albion that they have sacked their manager, Chris Hughton, a decent man in a dirty trade.

Perfidious Albion? Come on, Brighton are better than this, the timing let alone the decision. Brighton pride themselves on their principles, negotiating sure-footed passage through the swamp of the modern, scruple-free national game.

Look at the banners around the Amex Stadium, the notices on the wall underlining the behaviour they expect, the need to respect everybody. Well, managers deserve respect, too.

Hughton embodied values many associate with Brighton, integrity and inclusivity for starters. He is more than a mere man who stands in a dugout, directing operations. The 60-year-old represents qualities the game desperately needs: determination, uprightness, compassion. A quiet dignity defines him. A spin through his career shows what a special man he is, and what an important, inspiring individual Brighton have just ushered out on to the street.

The son of an Irish mother and Ghanaian father, Hughton was born in Forest Gate, east London, and when he began making his way as an energetic, intelligent left back for Tottenham Hotspur in the late Seventies, he suffered racist abuse from the opposition, occasionally “half a stand chanting at me”. Hughton ignored them. He endured poisonous remarks from opposing players. He didn’t complain, simply making sure “the next tackle went in a bit firmer”, as he once told me.

Grace under pressure characterises him. Hughton should be celebrated as one of football’s finest role models, an example for aspiring managers of how to build a career, taking his time and doing his apprenticeship, learning under everyone from Keith Burkinshaw to Ossie Ardiles, Glenn Hoddle to David Pleat and Martin Jol at Spurs. Brighton have just dispensed with a lot of experience.

On smashing through what Cyrille Regis always called the “glass ceiling” for black coaches wanting to break into management, Hughton won manager-of-the month awards in three of his first four months at Newcastle United. He got them promoted, got Andy Carroll performing consistently, and when he was eventually fired by Mike Ashley with the team 11th in the Premier League, fans demonstrated outside St James’ Park. He was replaced by Alan Pardew. That hardly worked out triumphantly.

On he went after Newcastle, steering Birmingham City into the Championship play-offs, helping to nurture Nathan Redmond and the on-loan Andros Townsend, and so grounded that he hosted a table at the club’s Christmas party in 2011 and invited kit men and groundstaff as his guests. Class.

It needs acknowledging that Hughton’s time at Norwich City from 2012 to 2014 is not remembered overly fondly by fans. Even amid his darkest hour at Carrow Road, he willingly agreed to interviews, and I remember talking to him at length about Norwich’s plight and he was hurting deeply, stressed by his failure to inspire the team. Hughton cares. He respects employers and supporters, and frets when he cannot deliver value.

This was the only occasion that I heard him raise his voice and that was after he discovered me at Colney Training Centre conducting an (he thought) unauthorised interview with Grant Holt. Far from full Fergie hairdryer, Hughton still made his dissatisfaction abundantly clear. He had issues with the striker at the time and the whole tension essentially boiled down to his wanting the best for the team. It’s never about him with Hughton. He doesn’t possess an ego.

Kindness runs through him. When Jonás Gutiérrez sought matches after recovering from testicular cancer at Newcastle, Hughton took his old player on loan to Carrow Road in 2014. Hughton was motivated mainly because of Gutiérrez’s ability but also by empathy.

Seven months after being sent packing by Norwich, he began galvanising Brighton, eventually getting them promoted to the Premier League and keeping them there, helping to generate more than £200 million from TV and prize money in two seasons. He was praised for his management, and also as a wonderful ambassador for the club.

After winning away to Ipswich Town shortly after the Shoreham air disaster in 2015, Hughton dedicated victory to two of the victims, Matt Grimstone, a member of the club’s groundstaff, and supporter Jacob Schilt. When Anthony Knockaert’s father died in 2016, Hughton called off training and organised for the players to travel over to near Lille for the funeral, showing their support for a grieving team-mate.

All the while, Hughton has been a beacon of hope for coaches who craved becoming No 1s, for black managers rightly concerned about the glass ceiling, for home-grown managers and those who have taken the long road.
Hughton is obviously a capable manager and it was scarcely two years ago that the FA chairman Greg Clarke backed him to potentially take charge of England. “Why not?” Clarke told The Times. “It would be wonderful to see a black England manager. It would put us forward 20 years.”

Hughton lifted Brighton even higher than mere elevation from the Championship into the Premier League. He placed them on the pantheon as a club that judged human beings on quality not ethnicity.

The perception of Brighton has always been of a club with a conscience, of fans finding ways to keep their cherished institution alive, fighting off the charlatans who would drag them down, pinch their land, threaten their birth-right. Hughton is too modest to say it, even think it, but he bestowed moral substance on Brighton. They will miss that.

Everyone who comes into contact with him instinctively warms to him. Fans find him willingly spending as long as required to satisfy selfie and autograph requests. Media from across the globe would visit Brighton’s splendid Lancing training retreat, as well as the Amex, and discovered to their delight a manager of a Premier League side welcoming and helpful. A manager with manners.

Even for those of us popping in to Lancing for an interview with a player would be invited over for a brief chat. How are you? How are the children? Hughton is a good man, as well as manager. Brighton have lost their greatest calling card.

If offspring truly reflect parenting skills, then Hughton can be particularly proud. When the Tube packed up the night of the Kick It Out 25th anniversary dinner at Stamford Bridge in February, a group of us were jettisoned at Earl’s Court. Hughton’s daughter, Aisha, kindly signalled to climb into her Uber. Chatty and friendly, she enthused about how much her father loved Brighton, the city and the club. Brighton was more than a job for Hughton, it was a passion.

We reached the Bridge in good time to hear Aisha’s father speak powerfully about how much the game had to do in combating racism. As the night closed, and Hughton needed to head south, he happily made the delayed journey to the door, stopping to talk to his many friends and admirers. That’s Chris. Decent. That’s why those who know him are so outraged by Brighton’s decision. They have let a good man go.

Brighton will argue that this was a decision carefully thought through. They can politely point out that Hughton’s side have been in a tailspin for most of 2019, taking three points from 27, and clinging to elite status only because of the incompetence of Huddersfield Town, Fulham and Cardiff City. Brighton’s owner, Tony Bloom, is neither uncaring nor imprudent and his ambitious new technical director, Dan Ashworth, the man who effectively appointed Gareth Southgate with England, is certainly no trigger-happy fool.

If Bloom and Ashworth can prise Graham Potter from Swansea City, then some sense will be conferred retrospectively on a seemingly callous decision, assuming that Potter’s desire for expansive football with, respectfully, average players does not see Brighton ripped apart.

At the very least, Hughton deserved a few days to bask in his achievement of keeping Brighton up, the principal demand from the club. Bloom and Ashworth waited only until the show was over, the media circus had moved on, and those fans supportive of Hughton did not have a match-day platform to chorus their disapproval. The timing is cowardly, even if Bloom and Ashworth can defend the decision itself. As a man and a manager, Hughton deserved better.


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/cowa ... -t9wdwx8zd

Chief, you're trying to make this thing stick. All I know is had Ranieri been black we would have shouted R. If Harry Rednapp had been black we would have shouted R. If Conte had been black we would have shouted R.
What happened to Houghton is not new and not extreme in the EPL.

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 12:56 pm 
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pajimoh wrote:
Chief, you're trying to make this thing stick. All I know is had Ranieri been black we would have shouted R. If Harry Rednapp had been black we would have shouted R. If Conte had been black we would have shouted R.
What happened to Houghton is not new and not extreme in the EPL.

You don’t understand how racism works. If black and white coaches are treated the same way, how come about 30% of players are black and less than 1% of coaches are black? Telling us that SOME white coaches are also treated unjustly doesn’t mean that the unfair treatment of Chris Hughton was not b/c of his race.

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 9:29 pm 
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cic old boy wrote:
pajimoh wrote:
Chief, you're trying to make this thing stick. All I know is had Ranieri been black we would have shouted R. If Harry Rednapp had been black we would have shouted R. If Conte had been black we would have shouted R.
What happened to Houghton is not new and not extreme in the EPL.

You don’t understand how racism works. If black and white coaches are treated the same way, how come about 30% of players are black and less than 1% of coaches are black? Telling us that SOME white coaches are also treated unjustly doesn’t mean that the unfair treatment of Chris Hughton was not b/c of his race.


in essence, a white coach a BHA would have been given more time

40 points in 17/18
36 points in 18/19

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 10:02 pm 
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cic old boy wrote:
pajimoh wrote:
Chief, you're trying to make this thing stick. All I know is had Ranieri been black we would have shouted R. If Harry Rednapp had been black we would have shouted R. If Conte had been black we would have shouted R.
What happened to Houghton is not new and not extreme in the EPL.

You don’t understand how racism works. If black and white coaches are treated the same way, how come about 30% of players are black and less than 1% of coaches are black? Telling us that SOME white coaches are also treated unjustly doesn’t mean that the unfair treatment of Chris Hughton was not b/c of his race.

I agree black and white coaches are not treated equally but one must also look at each case on it's merit.
You want me to agree that racist Brighton decides to give Houghton a black man a job when most other clubs won't. Are they trying to prove they are not racist?

After Houghton got them promoted, they did not say, he's only a championship coach, like Nigeria put aside black coaches and appoint whites once the black coaches have qualified for the WC - by the way, is that racism? Brighton stuck with Houghton.

In his first season in the EPL, he did well and they didn't sack him. His second season in the EPL saw him struggle and in the penultimate game, had Cardiff not lost, it would have been down to the last game of the season, which they lost to City and Cardiff won away at Man U. Had he been relegated, would his sacking have been justified or is surviving by the skin of your teeth an endorsement to carry on?
I commend BHA for sticking by him. They owe him that and they allowed him, whether they get relegated or not, stuck with him. Had he been sacked and a new manager appointed and they still got relegated, Houghton would have been blamed - Had the new manager succeed, the new manager would have taken the glory. As it stands, Houghton, a black man, kept BHA in the EPL for 2 consecutive seasons. Even Houghton would have been glad for the opportunity but disappointed at the outcome. But he'd understand it's the nature of the job.

I worry for other black managers and their chances when clubs who are willing to give them a chance suddenly find they could be accused of racism if they let them go in the future. How many black coaches have had 2 years in the EPL? Thank you BHA

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 1:42 pm 
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pajimoh wrote:
I agree black and white coaches are not treated equally but one must also look at each case on it's merit.
You want me to agree that racist Brighton decides to give Houghton a black man a job when most other clubs won't. Are they trying to prove they are not racist?

After Houghton got them promoted, they did not say, he's only a championship coach, like Nigeria put aside black coaches and appoint whites once the black coaches have qualified for the WC - by the way, is that racism? Brighton stuck with Houghton.

In his first season in the EPL, he did well and they didn't sack him. His second season in the EPL saw him struggle and in the penultimate game, had Cardiff not lost, it would have been down to the last game of the season, which they lost to City and Cardiff won away at Man U. Had he been relegated, would his sacking have been justified or is surviving by the skin of your teeth an endorsement to carry on?
I commend BHA for sticking by him. They owe him that and they allowed him, whether they get relegated or not, stuck with him. Had he been sacked and a new manager appointed and they still got relegated, Houghton would have been blamed - Had the new manager succeed, the new manager would have taken the glory. As it stands, Houghton, a black man, kept BHA in the EPL for 2 consecutive seasons. Even Houghton would have been glad for the opportunity but disappointed at the outcome. But he'd understand it's the nature of the job.

I worry for other black managers and their chances when clubs who are willing to give them a chance suddenly find they could be accused of racism if they let them go in the future. How many black coaches have had 2 years in the EPL? Thank you BHA

You still don't understand how racism works. Ron Atkinson was exposed as a racist, but he was the first to play 3 black players in the top division.

Hughton got the Brighton job when they were facing relegation from the Championship. They were rather desperate. He not only saved them, he got them promoted. They would have loved to sack him when they were promoted and when they stayed up last season, but it could have prompted a huge outcry. Even this sacking had to be done by stealth. While folks like you are tying yourselves in knots justifying nonsense, the fans didn't want to see him go b/c staying up is an achievement for them. In fact this report below called it a "surprise" sacking. And another desperate club is now seeking his services.
https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... -jokanovic

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 1:44 pm 
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tfco wrote:

in essence, a white coach a BHA would have been given more time

40 points in 17/18
36 points in 18/19

City should sack Pep
100 points in 17/18
98 points in 18/19

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 3:27 pm 
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cic old boy wrote:
tfco wrote:

in essence, a white coach a BHA would have been given more time

40 points in 17/18
36 points in 18/19

City should sack Pep
100 points in 17/18
98 points in 18/19


Does BHA have the right to sack Houghton?

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 3:28 pm 
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:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

cic old boy wrote:
Many of you don't understand how racism works. Sometimes racists give a black person a job - usually when they are desperate. And then you are expected to make a silk purse from a pig's ear. You won't get the credit when the results are good and get all the blame for bad results.

Quote:
Cowardly Brighton throw a good man in Chris Hughton onto the street

henry winter, chief football writer

In between exhaling after that breathtaking title race and the excitement of looking forward to the announcement of next season’s Premier League fixtures on June 13 (9am sharp, can’t wait), the heart sank at the brutal bulletin from Brighton & Hove Albion that they have sacked their manager, Chris Hughton, a decent man in a dirty trade.

Perfidious Albion? Come on, Brighton are better than this, the timing let alone the decision. Brighton pride themselves on their principles, negotiating sure-footed passage through the swamp of the modern, scruple-free national game.

Look at the banners around the Amex Stadium, the notices on the wall underlining the behaviour they expect, the need to respect everybody. Well, managers deserve respect, too.

Hughton embodied values many associate with Brighton, integrity and inclusivity for starters. He is more than a mere man who stands in a dugout, directing operations. The 60-year-old represents qualities the game desperately needs: determination, uprightness, compassion. A quiet dignity defines him. A spin through his career shows what a special man he is, and what an important, inspiring individual Brighton have just ushered out on to the street.

The son of an Irish mother and Ghanaian father, Hughton was born in Forest Gate, east London, and when he began making his way as an energetic, intelligent left back for Tottenham Hotspur in the late Seventies, he suffered racist abuse from the opposition, occasionally “half a stand chanting at me”. Hughton ignored them. He endured poisonous remarks from opposing players. He didn’t complain, simply making sure “the next tackle went in a bit firmer”, as he once told me.

Grace under pressure characterises him. Hughton should be celebrated as one of football’s finest role models, an example for aspiring managers of how to build a career, taking his time and doing his apprenticeship, learning under everyone from Keith Burkinshaw to Ossie Ardiles, Glenn Hoddle to David Pleat and Martin Jol at Spurs. Brighton have just dispensed with a lot of experience.

On smashing through what Cyrille Regis always called the “glass ceiling” for black coaches wanting to break into management, Hughton won manager-of-the month awards in three of his first four months at Newcastle United. He got them promoted, got Andy Carroll performing consistently, and when he was eventually fired by Mike Ashley with the team 11th in the Premier League, fans demonstrated outside St James’ Park. He was replaced by Alan Pardew. That hardly worked out triumphantly.

On he went after Newcastle, steering Birmingham City into the Championship play-offs, helping to nurture Nathan Redmond and the on-loan Andros Townsend, and so grounded that he hosted a table at the club’s Christmas party in 2011 and invited kit men and groundstaff as his guests. Class.

It needs acknowledging that Hughton’s time at Norwich City from 2012 to 2014 is not remembered overly fondly by fans. Even amid his darkest hour at Carrow Road, he willingly agreed to interviews, and I remember talking to him at length about Norwich’s plight and he was hurting deeply, stressed by his failure to inspire the team. Hughton cares. He respects employers and supporters, and frets when he cannot deliver value.

This was the only occasion that I heard him raise his voice and that was after he discovered me at Colney Training Centre conducting an (he thought) unauthorised interview with Grant Holt. Far from full Fergie hairdryer, Hughton still made his dissatisfaction abundantly clear. He had issues with the striker at the time and the whole tension essentially boiled down to his wanting the best for the team. It’s never about him with Hughton. He doesn’t possess an ego.

Kindness runs through him. When Jonás Gutiérrez sought matches after recovering from testicular cancer at Newcastle, Hughton took his old player on loan to Carrow Road in 2014. Hughton was motivated mainly because of Gutiérrez’s ability but also by empathy.

Seven months after being sent packing by Norwich, he began galvanising Brighton, eventually getting them promoted to the Premier League and keeping them there, helping to generate more than £200 million from TV and prize money in two seasons. He was praised for his management, and also as a wonderful ambassador for the club.

After winning away to Ipswich Town shortly after the Shoreham air disaster in 2015, Hughton dedicated victory to two of the victims, Matt Grimstone, a member of the club’s groundstaff, and supporter Jacob Schilt. When Anthony Knockaert’s father died in 2016, Hughton called off training and organised for the players to travel over to near Lille for the funeral, showing their support for a grieving team-mate.

All the while, Hughton has been a beacon of hope for coaches who craved becoming No 1s, for black managers rightly concerned about the glass ceiling, for home-grown managers and those who have taken the long road.
Hughton is obviously a capable manager and it was scarcely two years ago that the FA chairman Greg Clarke backed him to potentially take charge of England. “Why not?” Clarke told The Times. “It would be wonderful to see a black England manager. It would put us forward 20 years.”

Hughton lifted Brighton even higher than mere elevation from the Championship into the Premier League. He placed them on the pantheon as a club that judged human beings on quality not ethnicity.

The perception of Brighton has always been of a club with a conscience, of fans finding ways to keep their cherished institution alive, fighting off the charlatans who would drag them down, pinch their land, threaten their birth-right. Hughton is too modest to say it, even think it, but he bestowed moral substance on Brighton. They will miss that.

Everyone who comes into contact with him instinctively warms to him. Fans find him willingly spending as long as required to satisfy selfie and autograph requests. Media from across the globe would visit Brighton’s splendid Lancing training retreat, as well as the Amex, and discovered to their delight a manager of a Premier League side welcoming and helpful. A manager with manners.

Even for those of us popping in to Lancing for an interview with a player would be invited over for a brief chat. How are you? How are the children? Hughton is a good man, as well as manager. Brighton have lost their greatest calling card.

If offspring truly reflect parenting skills, then Hughton can be particularly proud. When the Tube packed up the night of the Kick It Out 25th anniversary dinner at Stamford Bridge in February, a group of us were jettisoned at Earl’s Court. Hughton’s daughter, Aisha, kindly signalled to climb into her Uber. Chatty and friendly, she enthused about how much her father loved Brighton, the city and the club. Brighton was more than a job for Hughton, it was a passion.

We reached the Bridge in good time to hear Aisha’s father speak powerfully about how much the game had to do in combating racism. As the night closed, and Hughton needed to head south, he happily made the delayed journey to the door, stopping to talk to his many friends and admirers. That’s Chris. Decent. That’s why those who know him are so outraged by Brighton’s decision. They have let a good man go.

Brighton will argue that this was a decision carefully thought through. They can politely point out that Hughton’s side have been in a tailspin for most of 2019, taking three points from 27, and clinging to elite status only because of the incompetence of Huddersfield Town, Fulham and Cardiff City. Brighton’s owner, Tony Bloom, is neither uncaring nor imprudent and his ambitious new technical director, Dan Ashworth, the man who effectively appointed Gareth Southgate with England, is certainly no trigger-happy fool.

If Bloom and Ashworth can prise Graham Potter from Swansea City, then some sense will be conferred retrospectively on a seemingly callous decision, assuming that Potter’s desire for expansive football with, respectfully, average players does not see Brighton ripped apart.

At the very least, Hughton deserved a few days to bask in his achievement of keeping Brighton up, the principal demand from the club. Bloom and Ashworth waited only until the show was over, the media circus had moved on, and those fans supportive of Hughton did not have a match-day platform to chorus their disapproval. The timing is cowardly, even if Bloom and Ashworth can defend the decision itself. As a man and a manager, Hughton deserved better.


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/cowa ... -t9wdwx8zd

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 3:35 pm 
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i have zero sympathy for any coach fired especially if they refuse to play Nigerians... next

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 3:43 pm 
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Quote:
Exclusive: Troy Townsend launches attack on Brighton for Chris Hughton sacking - 'We are now at worse than square one'

• Tom Morgan

• John Percy
13 MAY 2019 • 5:29PM
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Chris Hughton's shock sacking by Brighton sparked blistering criticism yesterday from anti-discrimination campaigners who said efforts to improve black and ethnic minority representation in management are "at worse than square one".

The Daily Telegraph understands executives are now set to interview Swansea City's Graham Potter after the cash-strapped Welsh club reluctantly gave the Seagulls permission to begin talks.

Brighton finished the season on a rotten run of three wins in their last 23 league games, but Troy Townsend, who leads Kick It Out's mentoring and leadership work, and former England winger John Barnes both said it was "ridiculous" to fire the manager who had kept the club in the Premier League for consecutive seasons.
While there is no suggestion his ethnicity was a factor in his sacking, the departure of Hughton, who also guided Brighton to the FA Cup semi-final this season, leaves Nuno Espirito Santo as the only black, Asian, and minority ethnic (BAME) manager in England's top tier. There are none in the Championship after Darren Moore was controversially sacked by West Bromwich Albion while still in contention for promotion. Sol Campbell, meanwhile, was forced to start his career in management at Macclesfield Town, who were then bottom of League Two.

"We are now at worse than square one," Townsend told the Telegraph. "What people don't understand is the real difficulties for black managers getting through the bottle neck at the top of football. We are talking about measly numbers."

Hughton, 60, who was contracted until 2021, was appointed Brighton manager in December 2014 and swiftly transformed the club into Championship promotion contenders, finishing third in his first full season before losing out in the play-offs, and then winning automatic promotion a year later. After finishing 15th in their first season in the Premier League, Brighton survived again this year.

Paul Nevin, regarded as one of the England's best young black coaches, will also leave Brighton as part of the dramatic changes at the club.
Brighton were a pioneering club for BAME coaching staff and still have Hope Powell in charge of the women's team.

However, Townsend said sacking Hughton so soon after the last game "is just staggering". "If a player had left at this stage, walked out on the club, people would be in uproar," he said. "It's so shabby. What are the expectations of Brighton? Surely it is to stay in the league. You are 4th from bottom and you have got to an FA Cup semi-final. I don't get it.

"They must have been planning it for some time. Look at how Chris has been treated at Newcastle and Norwich and now Brighton? Being nice is his nature, but I know behind closed doors he is a different guy, he knows how to get his teams going. He has given Brighton another year of Premier League football and he gets repaid like this? Really?"

Chairman Tony Bloom made the final decision to sack Hughton, saying the club's recent run "put our status at significant risk". Brighton expect to formally interview Potter in the next few days and will pay minimal compensation to Swansea if negotiations go smoothly.

Swansea are under pressure to raise around £30m this summer, with Wales international Daniel James and Matt Grimes both expected to be sold. Potter has impressed in south Wales after his appointment last summer, guiding Swansea to a tenth-placed finish in the Championship and the former defender is seen as a progressive, innovative coach who can take Brighton forward.

Second choice for the job is Derby's Frank Lampard, whose progress into coaching was partly aided by Brighton technical director Dan Ashworth, who is spearheading the recruitment process, during his time at the Football Association.
However, Barnes, whose last managerial job was at Tranmere Rovers in 2009, said Hughton should have been allowed to stay. "It shows the unrealistic expectations that football fans have generally - because for me that is a ridiculous decision," he told Sky Sports News.

Outside the top tier, BAME managers Jos Luhukay and Chris Powell also lost their jobs this season. Aside from Campbell and Nuno, Dino Maamria at Stevenage and Keith Curle of Northampton are from minority ethnic backgrounds.

Townsend questioned whether there was any genuine will in the game to tackle the bottle neck for black managers getting opportunities at the elite level.

"These sackings have a huge impact as they are role models," Townsend, the father of Crystal Palace forward Andros, added.
"Chris was a number two everywhere, then he branched out and finally got a long overdue chance. The way he carries himself, the way he speaks, he knows he has a wave of people under him who want to be like him. I'm really not sure what more he could have done for Brighton. Two more wins, would that have saved him?
"But do I think people care about lack of representation? Does this game really care? To be completely honest, I don't know. Chris is very attached to the LMA but does the rest of the game truly honestly care about him and Darren? I don't know. Here we are talking about this same c--- yet again."

Troy Townsend awarding Mohamed Salah hi 2018 FWA Footballer of the Year trophy CREDIT: PA ARCHIVE
Barnes added: "I am no more frustrated than I have been for the last 10 years. Not just looking at what goes on in football but what goes in life. Until we get rid of racial bias, sexism, homophobia in society, it will exist in all walks of society."

The representation of BAME figures in the dugout and the boardroom is dramatically below both the wider population percentage and the 30 per cent of professional players from BAME backgrounds. The EFL has proactively attempted to address this since June 2016 with new regulations, inspired by the NFL’s Rooney Rule, which require academies to advertise positions and to include at least one suitably qualified BAME candidate on the interview shortlist before then appointing on merit.

However, Barnes said yesterday the solution "is not to give more black people jobs in football, the solution is to give black people, women, homosexuals more respect in life, then that will filter up".
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/20 ... now-worse/

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 4:09 pm 
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cic old boy wrote:
tfco wrote:

in essence, a white coach a BHA would have been given more time

40 points in 17/18
36 points in 18/19

City should sack Pep
100 points in 17/18
98 points in 18/19


oh i'm sorry
i should have stated that the 36 points was just enough to stave off relegation

you're welcome

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 5:59 pm 
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This issue is expectation, such is the allure of the league’s riches, where the threat of relegation becomes less an abstract image in the haze and more a vivid form of defined edges, fear of its absence is overwhelming. One must apply context to the case, Brighton are afraid of relegation and have every right to be afraid, Bolton, Birmingham, Portsmouth, Sunderland are prime examples of the perils of plunging through the trap door. Houghton has been given 76 cracks at the whip in the pasts two seasons, can a review of the last two seasons reach favourable conclusion? Brighton have seen Bournemouth and Burnley push on and cement their Premiership status.

Houghton, as admirable as he has been, is cut from the very same clothes of yesteryear’s stalwarts, the elder statesmen of a bygone era. Bruce, McLeish, Pardew and alike. The race card is very much envogue at present, but in this instance, the ship sailed too close to the wind, two or three wins in 20 odd games is bullet worthy for any manager.


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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 6:24 pm 
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danfo driver wrote:

Does BHA have the right to sack Houghton?

You have the right to talk even if what you say is crap and I have the right to call out crap.

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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 6:25 pm 
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tfco wrote:

oh i'm sorry
i should have stated that the 36 points was just enough to stave off relegation

you're welcome

Or you could ask the board if they were expecting to qualify for Europe.

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 10:35 pm 
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This probably explains a lot about the discussions on this thread...I mean pros and cons:

Quote:
Hughton wrote a column for the Workers' Revolutionary Party publication News Line in the 1970s.[70][78] Hughton plays down the Trotskyist connection: "it's probably not as dramatic as it sounds. I've always had strong views on social issues such as hospitals - I think we should have a good health system - and the education system, too ... These days, players can do as many interviews and columns as they want. Back in the day, it wasn't like that. Anyway, I'm sure I wrote about football and football issues. Nothing else."[70] He is a member of the Labour Party.[79]

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 10:58 pm 
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furiously frank wrote:
This probably explains a lot about the discussions on this thread...I mean pros and cons:

Quote:
Hughton wrote a column for the Workers' Revolutionary Party publication News Line in the 1970s.[70][78] Hughton plays down the Trotskyist connection: "it's probably not as dramatic as it sounds. I've always had strong views on social issues such as hospitals - I think we should have a good health system - and the education system, too ... These days, players can do as many interviews and columns as they want. Back in the day, it wasn't like that. Anyway, I'm sure I wrote about football and football issues. Nothing else."[70] He is a member of the Labour Party.[79]


So this is why Commie in Chief is such a fan.


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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2019 10:00 am 
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furiously frank wrote:
This probably explains a lot about the discussions on this thread...I mean pros and cons:

Quote:
Hughton wrote a column for the Workers' Revolutionary Party publication News Line in the 1970s.[70][78] Hughton plays down the Trotskyist connection: "it's probably not as dramatic as it sounds. I've always had strong views on social issues such as hospitals - I think we should have a good health system - and the education system, too ... These days, players can do as many interviews and columns as they want. Back in the day, it wasn't like that. Anyway, I'm sure I wrote about football and football issues. Nothing else."[70] He is a member of the Labour Party.[79]

I wasn't even aware of this.

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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2019 10:11 am 
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cic old boy wrote:
furiously frank wrote:
This probably explains a lot about the discussions on this thread...I mean pros and cons:

Quote:
Hughton wrote a column for the Workers' Revolutionary Party publication News Line in the 1970s.[70][78] Hughton plays down the Trotskyist connection: "it's probably not as dramatic as it sounds. I've always had strong views on social issues such as hospitals - I think we should have a good health system - and the education system, too ... These days, players can do as many interviews and columns as they want. Back in the day, it wasn't like that. Anyway, I'm sure I wrote about football and football issues. Nothing else."[70] He is a member of the Labour Party.[79]

I wasn't even aware of this.


I was not myself. The guy is gold. Pure gold.

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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2019 7:24 pm 
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cic old boy wrote:
tfco wrote:

oh i'm sorry
i should have stated that the 36 points was just enough to stave off relegation

you're welcome

Or you could ask the board if they were expecting to qualify for Europe.


winning 2 games from the last 20 is not what the board expected

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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2019 7:37 pm 
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tfco wrote:

winning 2 games from the last 20 is not what the board expected

That looks like Ole's record and he kept his job.

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