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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 12:26 pm 
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Youth teams hold key to Nigeria’s football rebirth, says Uwejamomore
By Alex Monye
19 May 2020 | 1:19 am
https://guardian.ng/sport/youth-teams-hold-key-to-nigerias-football-rebirth-says-uwejamomore/


His youthful looks conflicts with the huge insight he has of modern football. When you listen to Eboboritse Uwejamomore, you will come out with the feeling that the young man is destined for the top of the coaching profession, which he has embraced so early in life.

Uwejamomore is a 24-year-old UK trained coach, who already has the UEFA B licence. And like so many of the famous gaffers, the Delta State-born budding trainer wants to start at the junior, specifically with the national U-17 team, the Golden Eaglets.

Uwejamomore, who recently applied to be considered for the national cadet job, told The Guardian from is UK base last week that the experience he has acquired from grooming young talented players over the years would come handy if he is giving the job. His target is the domestic scene, where he hopes to traverse in search of young talented stars for the U-17 national team of Nigerians’ dream.


Uwejamomore currently trains a national amateur side, Nilayo FC of Abeokuta, which he has transformed into one of the toughest sides in Ogun State.

Explaining his vision for Nigerian football, Uwejamomore said he would ensure that only eligible players made the national U-17 team if given the chance, adding that Nigerian youth football should be managed in such a way that cadet players grow to become international super stars within a given time frame.

“I left Nigeria at a tender age to school in UK. I hold dual citizenship, but my heart is with Nigeria and I hope to contribute to make the country great in football.

“ I developed the coaching programme for NIlayo FC and the team has been doing well and so, coaching the Golden Eaglets will not be a problem to me.



“The structure of getting players is already there, but many people do not know this.

“There is an U-23 and U-15 set up, which has been spearheaded by NFF First Vice President, Seyi Akinwumi.
This current NFF programme that has players scattered across the country can supply 70 per cent of players needed for the cadet team.

“We can leave some room for players who may not be captured under the programme, but are eligible to play in the team,” he said.
Uwejamomore, who revealed that he has an English FA level two qualification in scouting and talent identification, said his age would also give him the advantage while relating with the U-17 players. “I can understand their issues in education and social aspect and work things out with them to make them better footballers,” he said

Uwejamomere is an advocate of grassroots football development, who believes that Nigerian football can regain its lost glory if due attention is given to the foundational development of the game.

“Without doubt, the likes of Wilfred Ndidi, Victor Osimhen, Samuel Chukwueze and Kelechi Iheanacho are currently big players in Europe.

“Ndidi is one of the best defensive midfielders currently in the English Premier League, while Osimhen is also one of the best strikers in world football at this point.

These players played their early football in Nigeria before they were transferred abroad. So the talents are definitely in Nigeria.



“We just have to continue helping these young stars at the grassroots to develop and hone their skills.”He commends Gernot Rohr and NFF president, Amaju Pinnick for given Nigeria’s young players the opportunity to play for the Super Eagles, adding that that approach has re-energised the senior national team.

He believes, however, that “the fastest way to get quality players from the grassroots is for the NFF to appoint scouts in South East, South West, North East and all the geopolitical zones of Nigeria to discover talents from these regions.”

According to Uwejamomore, such discovered players should then be sent to be part of the youth teams of Nigerian Professional Football League (NPFL) clubs to sharpen their skills.

“If a coach wants to get a player from any of the national teams, he will not have to look too far for his materials. Players from MFM, Enyimba, Kano Pillars, Rivers United, Rangers, Plateau United and Lobi Stars, among other clubs, can form a formidable U-17 national team.
“The NFF can even organize a youth league featuring these teams and other academies to expose these young players to competitive football.”

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The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 1:02 pm 
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Enugu II wrote:
Quote:
“If a coach wants to get a player from any of the national teams, he will not have to look too far for his materials. Players from MFM, Enyimba, Kano Pillars, Rivers United, Rangers, Plateau United and Lobi Stars, among other clubs, can form a formidable U-17 national team.
“The NFF can even organize a youth league featuring these teams and other academies to expose these young players to competitive football.”

Enugu II,

Hmmmm, I wonder how many U-17 boys that can play for a top team in the NPFL?? None, if you ask me. If they are sincere, they should go to the secondary schools' competitons to look for true U-17 players.


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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 1:15 pm 
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ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
Quote:
“If a coach wants to get a player from any of the national teams, he will not have to look too far for his materials. Players from MFM, Enyimba, Kano Pillars, Rivers United, Rangers, Plateau United and Lobi Stars, among other clubs, can form a formidable U-17 national team.
“The NFF can even organize a youth league featuring these teams and other academies to expose these young players to competitive football.”

Enugu II,

Hmmmm, I wonder how many U-17 boys that can play for a top team in the NPFL?? None, if you ask me. If they are sincere, they should go to the secondary schools' competitons to look for true U-17 players.
You need to hear the stories of Awoniyi and Osimhen when they were trialling for the U17.

No way would they have been able to break into any full NPFL team.

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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 2:13 pm 
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Damunk wrote:
ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
Quote:
“If a coach wants to get a player from any of the national teams, he will not have to look too far for his materials. Players from MFM, Enyimba, Kano Pillars, Rivers United, Rangers, Plateau United and Lobi Stars, among other clubs, can form a formidable U-17 national team.
“The NFF can even organize a youth league featuring these teams and other academies to expose these young players to competitive football.”

Enugu II,

Hmmmm, I wonder how many U-17 boys that can play for a top team in the NPFL?? None, if you ask me. If they are sincere, they should go to the secondary schools' competitons to look for true U-17 players.
You need to hear the stories of Awoniyi and Osimhen when they were trialling for the U17.

No way would they have been able to break into any full NPFL team.

I think it goes without saying that anybody looking for U-17 players in the NPFL is deceiving himself.

By the way Damunk, I am going to send you a PM now.


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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 2:30 pm 
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I actually believe that you guys are reading the article wrong. I do not se where he stated that U17 players should be selected from the Nigerian league. May be I missed it. My understanding is that he is simply stating that there are good players all over the country including at the U17 level and he outlined how such players can be identified.

Quote:
“The structure of getting players is already there, but many people do not know this.

“There is an U-23 and U-15 set up, which has been spearheaded by NFF First Vice President, Seyi Akinwumi. This current NFF programme that has players scattered across the country can supply 70 per cent of players needed for the cadet team.


Quote:
He believes, however, that “the fastest way to get quality players from the grassroots is for the NFF to appoint scouts in South East, South West, North East and all the geopolitical zones of Nigeria to discover talents from these regions.”

According to Uwejamomore, such discovered players should then be sent to be part of the youth teams of Nigerian Professional Football League (NPFL) clubs to sharpen their skills.


His reference to U17 players and the NPFl is the youth teams of the NPFL (see quote above).

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The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 2:57 pm 
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Enugu II wrote:
I actually believe that you guys are reading the article wrong. I do not se where he stated that U17 players should be selected from the Nigerian league. May be I missed it. My understanding is that he is simply stating that there are good players all over the country including at the U17 level and he outlined how such players can be identified.

Quote:
“The structure of getting players is already there, but many people do not know this.

“There is an U-23 and U-15 set up, which has been spearheaded by NFF First Vice President, Seyi Akinwumi. This current NFF programme that has players scattered across the country can supply 70 per cent of players needed for the cadet team.


Quote:
He believes, however, that “the fastest way to get quality players from the grassroots is for the NFF to appoint scouts in South East, South West, North East and all the geopolitical zones of Nigeria to discover talents from these regions.”

According to Uwejamomore, such discovered players should then be sent to be part of the youth teams of Nigerian Professional Football League (NPFL) clubs to sharpen their skills.


His reference to U17 players and the NPFl is the youth teams of the NPFL (see quote above).

Yes, but the NPFL teams don't have youth teams in the real sense of it. Real youths are either in school or in academies. NPFL teams should not feature in U-17 talk for now unless and until the much talked about overhaul of Nigerian football takes place.


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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 3:30 pm 
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We are a country that seemingly has lying in our DNA. Most of us know the truth...

If we want real youth, we should focus on schools. It will not be 100% full-proof, but it will capture a preponderance of real U-17 players.

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Form is temporary; Class is Permanent!
Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 3:42 pm 
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ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
I actually believe that you guys are reading the article wrong. I do not se where he stated that U17 players should be selected from the Nigerian league. May be I missed it. My understanding is that he is simply stating that there are good players all over the country including at the U17 level and he outlined how such players can be identified.

Quote:
“The structure of getting players is already there, but many people do not know this.

“There is an U-23 and U-15 set up, which has been spearheaded by NFF First Vice President, Seyi Akinwumi. This current NFF programme that has players scattered across the country can supply 70 per cent of players needed for the cadet team.


Quote:
He believes, however, that “the fastest way to get quality players from the grassroots is for the NFF to appoint scouts in South East, South West, North East and all the geopolitical zones of Nigeria to discover talents from these regions.”

According to Uwejamomore, such discovered players should then be sent to be part of the youth teams of Nigerian Professional Football League (NPFL) clubs to sharpen their skills.


His reference to U17 players and the NPFl is the youth teams of the NPFL (see quote above).

Yes, but the NPFL teams don't have youth teams in the real sense of it. Real youths are either in school or in academies. NPFL teams should not feature in U-17 talk for now unless and until the much talked about overhaul of Nigerian football takes place.


Ukwala

I do not think he says that it exists inspite of previous attempts to get the clubs to establish such teams and/or encourage them to use such players in league games. The point that he makes, as I read it is three-fold:

1. The NFF has a system from which it selects youth teams. This was copying the Cocz Colz formula. This began under Ismailz Lulu and is still there. People like Iheanacho came from that system.

2. That it is also possible to use the current geopolitical zones to establish identification zones for youth players.

3, To have youth players for existing clubs. This particular system was attempted twice in recent times but has failed because of lack of serious interests by clubs.

Of Sax ll the above, only #1 has been consistent in recent years as an identification system. This is my reading of his tr all based on my previous knowledge oil f what gives on Nd what he has alluded to.

_________________
The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 4:54 pm 
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Enugu II wrote:
ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
I actually believe that you guys are reading the article wrong. I do not se where he stated that U17 players should be selected from the Nigerian league. May be I missed it. My understanding is that he is simply stating that there are good players all over the country including at the U17 level and he outlined how such players can be identified.

Quote:
“The structure of getting players is already there, but many people do not know this.

“There is an U-23 and U-15 set up, which has been spearheaded by NFF First Vice President, Seyi Akinwumi. This current NFF programme that has players scattered across the country can supply 70 per cent of players needed for the cadet team.


Quote:
He believes, however, that “the fastest way to get quality players from the grassroots is for the NFF to appoint scouts in South East, South West, North East and all the geopolitical zones of Nigeria to discover talents from these regions.”

According to Uwejamomore, such discovered players should then be sent to be part of the youth teams of Nigerian Professional Football League (NPFL) clubs to sharpen their skills.


His reference to U17 players and the NPFl is the youth teams of the NPFL (see quote above).

Yes, but the NPFL teams don't have youth teams in the real sense of it. Real youths are either in school or in academies. NPFL teams should not feature in U-17 talk for now unless and until the much talked about overhaul of Nigerian football takes place.


Ukwala

I do not think he says that it exists inspite of previous attempts to get the clubs to establish such teams and/or encourage them to use such players in league games. The point that he makes, as I read it is three-fold:

1. The NFF has a system from which it selects youth teams. This was copying the Cocz Colz formula. This began under Ismailz Lulu and is still there. People like Iheanacho came from that system.

2. That it is also possible to use the current geopolitical zones to establish identification zones for youth players.

3, To have youth players for existing clubs. This particular system was attempted twice in recent times but has failed because of lack of serious interests by clubs.

Of Sax ll the above, only #1 has been consistent in recent years as an identification system. This is my reading of his tr all based on my previous knowledge oil f what gives on Nd what he has alluded to.

Enugu II,

Fair enough. He should realise that item 3 will not work in the present dispensation of government owned clubs. Strengthening school football is the way to go, e.g. reinstating the academical competitions of old. So there’ll be a competition for state school champions akin to the current Shell cup and the other for State select teams to capture those good players that don’t play for the state champions.


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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 5:47 pm 
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ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
I actually believe that you guys are reading the article wrong. I do not se where he stated that U17 players should be selected from the Nigerian league. May be I missed it. My understanding is that he is simply stating that there are good players all over the country including at the U17 level and he outlined how such players can be identified.

Quote:
“The structure of getting players is already there, but many people do not know this.

“There is an U-23 and U-15 set up, which has been spearheaded by NFF First Vice President, Seyi Akinwumi. This current NFF programme that has players scattered across the country can supply 70 per cent of players needed for the cadet team.


Quote:
He believes, however, that “the fastest way to get quality players from the grassroots is for the NFF to appoint scouts in South East, South West, North East and all the geopolitical zones of Nigeria to discover talents from these regions.”

According to Uwejamomore, such discovered players should then be sent to be part of the youth teams of Nigerian Professional Football League (NPFL) clubs to sharpen their skills.


His reference to U17 players and the NPFl is the youth teams of the NPFL (see quote above).

Yes, but the NPFL teams don't have youth teams in the real sense of it. Real youths are either in school or in academies. NPFL teams should not feature in U-17 talk for now unless and until the much talked about overhaul of Nigerian football takes place.


Ukwala

I do not think he says that it exists inspite of previous attempts to get the clubs to establish such teams and/or encourage them to use such players in league games. The point that he makes, as I read it is three-fold:

1. The NFF has a system from which it selects youth teams. This was copying the Cocz Colz formula. This began under Ismailz Lulu and is still there. People like Iheanacho came from that system.

2. That it is also possible to use the current geopolitical zones to establish identification zones for youth players.

3, To have youth players for existing clubs. This particular system was attempted twice in recent times but has failed because of lack of serious interests by clubs.

Of Sax ll the above, only #1 has been consistent in recent years as an identification system. This is my reading of his tr all based on my previous knowledge oil f what gives on Nd what he has alluded to.

Enugu II,

Fair enough. He should realise that item 3 will not work in the present dispensation of government owned clubs. Strengthening school football is the way to go, e.g. reinstating the academical competitions of old. So there’ll be a competition for state school champions akin to the current Shell cup and the other for State select teams to capture those good players that don’t play for the state champions.


ukwala,

You are possibly right. Thus far, none of these clubs have shown any serious interest in youth football. The point though is he isn't talking about getting U17 players from the current setup of league football.

_________________
The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 6:07 pm 
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He's not a real Nigerian, he didn't earn his stripes selling Gala under the Obalende bridge.


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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 6:19 pm 
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kalani JR wrote:
He's not a real Nigerian, he didn't earn his stripes selling Gala under the Obalende bridge.


That is why he likely fits the bill, at least for Pinnick and others who think the differentiation is important :rotf: :rotf:

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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 1:25 am 
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txj wrote:
We are a country that seemingly has lying in our DNA. Most of us know the truth...

If we want real youth, we should focus on schools. It will not be 100% full-proof, but it will capture a preponderance of real U-17 players.

Nope! We are a country that seemingly has avoiding hard work in our DNA...

That's why we cannot do basic things like conducting a census. If you are looking for REAL U17s (don't know what you mean by "youth" in a country that 40+ year-olds lead "youth" groups), look for REAL U17s. PERIOD! There are kids over 17 years old in secondary schools and kids under 17 years old outside of secondary school. Put in the work and quit lazying around and punishing real U17 kids for the laziness and incompetence of adults. SMH

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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 8:09 pm 
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Gotti wrote:
txj wrote:
We are a country that seemingly has lying in our DNA. Most of us know the truth...

If we want real youth, we should focus on schools. It will not be 100% full-proof, but it will capture a preponderance of real U-17 players.

Nope! We are a country that seemingly has avoiding hard work in our DNA...

That's why we cannot do basic things like conducting a census. If you are looking for REAL U17s (don't know what you mean by "youth" in a country that 40+ year-olds lead "youth" groups), look for REAL U17s. PERIOD! There are kids over 17 years old in secondary schools and kids under 17 years old outside of secondary school. Put in the work and quit lazying around and punishing real U17 kids for the laziness and incompetence of adults. SMH


If you want to find real U-17 you go to source- secondary schools, period. The rest is mere red herring by professional enablers of cheating.

There will be some players over 17, but it is probably at a minimum.

The real issue is ensuring that ineligible players are not fake "registered" in the school, but there are multiple other areas to validate each player's registration.

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Liverpool, European Champions 2005.

We watched this very boring video, 500 times, of Sacchi doing defensive drills, using sticks and without the ball, with Maldini, Baresi and Albertini. We used to think before then that if the other players are better, you have to lose. After that we learned anything is possible – you can beat better teams by using tactics." Jurgen Klopp


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