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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2020 4:48 pm 
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A great move by the LMC :clap: :clap: :clap:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2020 5:37 pm 
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ukwala,

I recently wrote a piece about something close to this as way to get the NPFL ,loving. The difference is that I thought it was a way for private interests to force a break away from the state-sponsored NPFL to create a league that could become economically viable.

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The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2020 6:01 pm 
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Enugu II wrote:
ukwala,

I recently wrote a piece about something close to this as way to get the NPFL ,loving. The difference is that I thought it was a way for private interests to force a break away from the state-sponsored NPFL to create a league that could become economically viable.

EII,

It is going to take time for private interests to be in a position to force a break away from the NPFL. To start with, the costs of renting the mostly government-owned stadia and providing security on matchdays will kill the private clubs. I think the private clubs have to coexist with the state-sponsored teams in the NPFL and gradually build up their fan base, physical infrastructure and commercial framework. Only then can they attract this type of deal which will help them to be independent.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2020 8:54 pm 
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ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
ukwala,

I recently wrote a piece about something close to this as way to get the NPFL ,loving. The difference is that I thought it was a way for private interests to force a break away from the state-sponsored NPFL to create a league that could become economically viable.

EII,

It is going to take time for private interests to be in a position to force a break away from the NPFL. To start with, the costs of renting the mostly government-owned stadia and providing security on matchdays will kill the private clubs. I think the private clubs have to coexist with the state-sponsored teams in the NPFL and gradually build up their fan base, physical infrastructure and commercial framework. Only then can they attract this type of deal which will help them to be independent.



I agree that it will take time but for an entirely different reason -- FIFA. Right time, FIFA deals strictly with only the NFF. Thus, if private interests fund their own league they will become labelled "suspended" by the NFF making it difficult even for players from such leagues transferring to Europe. In my view, that will be the biggest hurdle.

The point you raise is equally important but I believe there could be stadia in Nigeria with reasonable rental. They do not have too be the huge ones given the paucity of spectators to NPFL games in the first place. Secondly, while you may need a few state police, teams or the league can hire private security which may become a business purchased at cheaper costs. But there also may be revenue sources that the league could create. Mind you the league does not even need to be the current 20 teams nor does it have to be a nationwide home-away series. It requires thinking outside the current box of an NPFL 20-team league.

Let me add, that the idea does not solely focus on focus but creating life content involving the players and a full online TV package that is worked in with Nollywood and the like. But the big deal it will not be regular TV but via online/phone etc.

_________________
The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2020 11:54 am 
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Enugu II wrote:
ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
ukwala,

I recently wrote a piece about something close to this as way to get the NPFL ,loving. The difference is that I thought it was a way for private interests to force a break away from the state-sponsored NPFL to create a league that could become economically viable.

EII,

It is going to take time for private interests to be in a position to force a break away from the NPFL. To start with, the costs of renting the mostly government-owned stadia and providing security on matchdays will kill the private clubs. I think the private clubs have to coexist with the state-sponsored teams in the NPFL and gradually build up their fan base, physical infrastructure and commercial framework. Only then can they attract this type of deal which will help them to be independent.



I agree that it will take time but for an entirely different reason -- FIFA. Right time, FIFA deals strictly with only the NFF. Thus, if private interests fund their own league they will become labelled "suspended" by the NFF making it difficult even for players from such leagues transferring to Europe. In my view, that will be the biggest hurdle.

The point you raise is equally important but I believe there could be stadia in Nigeria with reasonable rental. They do not have too be the huge ones given the paucity of spectators to NPFL games in the first place. Secondly, while you may need a few state police, teams or the league can hire private security which may become a business purchased at cheaper costs. But there also may be revenue sources that the league could create. Mind you the league does not even need to be the current 20 teams nor does it have to be a nationwide home-away series. It requires thinking outside the current box of an NPFL 20-team league.

Let me add, that the idea does not solely focus on focus but creating life content involving the players and a full online TV package that is worked in with Nollywood and the like. But the big deal it will not be regular TV but via online/phone etc.


Prof, I can't get over the fact that we don't want to do what is right. States should not be running professional football clubs, especially in Nigeria. Nobody can tell me that this cannot be achieved in Nigeria. Example of aviation, Nollywood, Telecoms, entertainment, etc are not run by the government, so why not football. All the states need to do is to invest in the respective teams, e.g. a 5 year plan, to provide the required infrastructure like stadia, academy, start up capital etc, incorporate it then hand it over to professionals to run. The state can have a controlling stake e.g. 51% of the shares, with a plan to reap dividends within 5 to 10 years. That way ordinary citizens and corporate bodies can invest in the clubs. This ensures that after the initial outlay, the states will have a return on investment in the long run and no more spending money made for critical sectors of the economy on players wages and other club admin costs.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2020 12:02 pm 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwvCFf-eiLk&t=17s

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2020 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2004 10:50 am
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Location: Nigeria
Enugu II wrote:
ukwala wrote:
Enugu II wrote:
ukwala,

I recently wrote a piece about something close to this as way to get the NPFL ,loving. The difference is that I thought it was a way for private interests to force a break away from the state-sponsored NPFL to create a league that could become economically viable.

EII,

It is going to take time for private interests to be in a position to force a break away from the NPFL. To start with, the costs of renting the mostly government-owned stadia and providing security on matchdays will kill the private clubs. I think the private clubs have to coexist with the state-sponsored teams in the NPFL and gradually build up their fan base, physical infrastructure and commercial framework. Only then can they attract this type of deal which will help them to be independent.



I agree that it will take time but for an entirely different reason -- FIFA. Right time, FIFA deals strictly with only the NFF. Thus, if private interests fund their own league they will become labelled "suspended" by the NFF making it difficult even for players from such leagues transferring to Europe. In my view, that will be the biggest hurdle.

The point you raise is equally important but I believe there could be stadia in Nigeria with reasonable rental. They do not have too be the huge ones given the paucity of spectators to NPFL games in the first place. Secondly, while you may need a few state police, teams or the league can hire private security which may become a business purchased at cheaper costs. But there also may be revenue sources that the league could create. Mind you the league does not even need to be the current 20 teams nor does it have to be a nationwide home-away series. It requires thinking outside the current box of an NPFL 20-team league.

Let me add, that the idea does not solely focus on focus but creating life content involving the players and a full online TV package that is worked in with Nollywood and the like. But the big deal it will not be regular TV but via online/phone etc.

EII,

I think we can discount the idea of a separate league as, clearly, it will not fly. The private interests will have to compete with the government-owned clubs in the current league structure and eventually ‘kill’ them if their product is superior. Remember however that private clubs have sprung up from time to time, starting from Ayufsalam Rocks in 1976 (or maybe Stationery Stores before them), through Abiola Babes, Leventis, Udoji, etc. to the present ones like Ifeanyi Ubah and MFM but they fizzle out after some time. The reason why they fizzle out is what needs to be ascertained and overcome if we are ever going to see a league of private interests.


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