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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2021 10:03 pm 
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Just read this in the local papers...RIP Dean!

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2021 8:38 pm 
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RIP, Show-Show, The Minister of Defence.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2021 12:50 pm 
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RIP MoD

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2021 5:49 pm 
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Sofoluwe: The unsung Dean of Defence
Published February 13, 2021
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In this report, ’TANA AIYEJINA takes a look at the illustrious career of late ex-Super Eagles defender Yisa Sofoluwe, who was buried on Wednesday in Lagos

The big wigs of Nigerian football or top government officials were not there, neither was the fanfare and ceremony usually associated with the burial of a national hero, during Yisa Sofoluwe’s burial on Wednesday at Atan Cemetery, Yaba, Lagos.

Yet, this was a man who toiled for close to a decade in his quest to put the country’s name on the global football map.

Former Super Eagles defender Sofoluwe died on Tuesday evening at the Intensive Care Unit of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, after being diagnosed with mild cerebral atrophy, a brain disease. He died at the of age 53.

The retired footballer paid his dues after an illustrious national team and club careers.

Sofoluwe was part of a generation of youngsters that represented Nigeria at the country’s first appearance at a FIFA World Cup, the U-20 version, in Mexico, in 1983.

Spotting the No.6 jersey, left-back Sofoluwe played alongside some of the country’s most talented players like Chibuzor Ehilegbu, Tarila Okorowanta, captain Ali Jeje, Wilfred Agbonavbare, Paul Okoku, amongst others in Mexico.

The first timers were seen as underdogs, but they proved their critics wrong in the ensuing games against more fancied opponents.

They beat huge favourites USSR 1-0, lost 3-0 to a Brazil side that paraded Bebeto, Dunga and Jorginho, before holding the Netherlands to a goalless stalemate in their final Group D tie.

They crashed out in the group stage, but the young Nigerians had every reason to hold their heads high.

That singular achievement would go on to instill the ‘can do’ spirit in the country’s array of young and talented footballers.

And it ushered in amazing success stories in youth football just two years later, as the Flying Eagles claimed bronze at the U-20 World Cup in Russia, while the Golden Eaglets claimed the first U-17 World Cup in China.

Sofoluwe got instant promotion alongside several of his Moscow ‘83 teammates to the senior national team, then known as the Green Eagles.

Same year, he made his national team debut against Morocco in a 1984 Africa Cup of Nations qualifier.

How did it happen? The Eagles had been held 0-0 in Benin City in the first leg and for the return leg, coach Adegboye Onigbinde and his assistant James Peters invited some members from the Flying Eagles of that year’s U-20 World Cup, including Sofoluwe.

The others were Ehilegbu, Tajudeen Disu, Okoku, Agbonavbare, Okorowanta and Humphrey Edobor.

Nobody gave the side, made up largely of rookies, a chance but a gutsy display by the lads earned them another goalless stalemate, but they qualified for the AFCON after overcoming the North Africans on penalties.

The man who gave Sofoluwe his first Nigeria cap Onigbinde said the defender’s attitude to work won him over.

“He was well-behaved, dedicated and hardworking, these were some of the qualities that made me admire him, “Onigbinde told Saturday PUNCH.

Onigbinde’s move to give the youngsters a chance at top level continental football worked wonders at the AFCON tournament proper as well.

Sofoluwe was in the thick of the action as Nigeria reached the final of the 1984 Africa Cup of Nations in Ivory Coast, only to lose 3-1 to a Theophile Abega and Roger Milla inspired Cameroon.

On the way to the final, he scored his penalty kick in the Eagles hard-fought 8-7 shootout defeat of Egypt after score stood at 2-2 after extra time in the semi-finals.

Sofoluwe played alongside some of the country’s most revered and feared defenders and was the Eagles most consistent left-back between 1983 and 1988.

He, alongside inspirational captain Stephen Keshi, with their calm demeanour, brought a balance to ‘Benin Boys’ Sunday Eboigbe, Bright Omokaro and Austin Eguavoen’s rugged and hard-stance style.

“He (Sofoluwe) was one of the quiet ones in camp,” national teammate Samson Siasia told Saturday PUNCH.

“He was clean and neat with his tackles. He was a very smart footballer; the only defender I think never had a yellow card.”

Truly, Sofoluwe was the quintessential tough guy — strong, silent and self-contained.

At just 5ft8in, he was petite for a defender, but he made up with his skills, hard work, dedication and commitment on the pitch.

Try him for size at your peril. Strikers of his era still have stories to tell about their confrontations with the late defender till this day.

He was also very versatile and proved his mettle at centre-back, a position usually dominated by towering and domineering defenders.

“Judging from his height, you would think he won’t be able to play in central defence. But he played that role very well too. He was awesome,” Siasia added.

Fittingly, legendary radio commentator Ernest Okonkwo nicknamed him the Dean of Defence.

He also featured as the Eagles reached the final of the 1988 AFCON in Morocco, and racked up 40 international caps overall, with one goal to his credit, scored in the 3-1 defeat of Kenya in a 1986 World Cup qualification fixture.

At club level, the fallen star played for ITT Lagos (1982-83), Abiola Babes (1984-87), where he reached four FA Cup finals, winning two in 1985 and 1987, and Julius Berger (1988) on the domestic scene.

During an era when Belgium became the Mecca of Nigerian stars, Sofoluwe moved to the European country, where he first starred for RFC Namur between 1990 and 1992. He also played for Royal Union Hutoise (1993-94), RFC Lessine (1994-96) and Winterslag (1988-89), all in Belgium.

He was part of a generation that played for the love of the game and not for the lure of money.

But then, football was not the big business it is now, in this part of the world.

He didn’t make the megabucks, and that would later affect him on retirement, just like most stars of his era.

Lagos landlords want their rents paid as at when due, not listening to stories about past exploits on the pitch.

Gist has it that Sofoluwe had a couple of rent issues and was forced to move from Ikotun to Ikorodu, where he got a cheaper apartment, before his death.

At his burial, only a handful of his ex-teammates, ex-internationals and friends joined his wife, Busola, and their two kids to bid Sofoluwe bye.

It didn’t come as a shock to the Nigerian football faithful though. It’s become a standard for Nigerian sports officials to abandon their dead heroes during their burial rites.

It happened in the case of the late Stephen Keshi in 2016, former Super Falcons captain, Ifeanyi Chiejine, who died in 2020, and most recently Senegal 1992 AFCON defender Ajibade Babalade, who was buried in Ibadan last month.

“None of the NFF officials came for the burial. Seyi Akinwunmi (NFF VP) said he wasn’t aware today (Wednesday) was his burial. I called him and he said he wasn’t aware, I told him that he should know since Sofoluwe was a Muslim. We didn’t see anybody,” Jide Oguntuase, a member of the Scotland 1989 Golden Eaglets, told The PUNCH on Wednesday.

Remember how late South African goalkeeper Senzo Meyiwa, who played just seven times for his country, was given a befitting state burial, after he was shot dead on October 26, 2014?

Prior to his burial, Meyiwa’s body received a guard of honour in the streets of Umlazi, his hometown.

In Nigeria, it’s the reverse: the Sofoluwe, the Dean of Defence, departed as the unsung hero.

Copyright PUNCH.

All rights reserved. This material, and other digital content on this website, may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from PUNCH.

Contact: theeditor@punchng.com
https://punchng.com/sofoluwe-the-unsung ... f-defence/

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2021 2:15 pm 
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Toxicarrow wrote:
Sofoluwe: The unsung Dean of Defence
Published February 13, 2021
Kindly Share This Story

In this report, ’TANA AIYEJINA takes a look at the illustrious career of late ex-Super Eagles defender Yisa Sofoluwe, who was buried on Wednesday in Lagos

The big wigs of Nigerian football or top government officials were not there, neither was the fanfare and ceremony usually associated with the burial of a national hero, during Yisa Sofoluwe’s burial on Wednesday at Atan Cemetery, Yaba, Lagos.

Yet, this was a man who toiled for close to a decade in his quest to put the country’s name on the global football map.

Former Super Eagles defender Sofoluwe died on Tuesday evening at the Intensive Care Unit of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, after being diagnosed with mild cerebral atrophy, a brain disease. He died at the of age 53.

The retired footballer paid his dues after an illustrious national team and club careers.

Sofoluwe was part of a generation of youngsters that represented Nigeria at the country’s first appearance at a FIFA World Cup, the U-20 version, in Mexico, in 1983.

Spotting the No.6 jersey, left-back Sofoluwe played alongside some of the country’s most talented players like Chibuzor Ehilegbu, Tarila Okorowanta, captain Ali Jeje, Wilfred Agbonavbare, Paul Okoku, amongst others in Mexico.

The first timers were seen as underdogs, but they proved their critics wrong in the ensuing games against more fancied opponents.

They beat huge favourites USSR 1-0, lost 3-0 to a Brazil side that paraded Bebeto, Dunga and Jorginho, before holding the Netherlands to a goalless stalemate in their final Group D tie.

They crashed out in the group stage, but the young Nigerians had every reason to hold their heads high.

That singular achievement would go on to instill the ‘can do’ spirit in the country’s array of young and talented footballers.

And it ushered in amazing success stories in youth football just two years later, as the Flying Eagles claimed bronze at the U-20 World Cup in Russia, while the Golden Eaglets claimed the first U-17 World Cup in China.

Sofoluwe got instant promotion alongside several of his Moscow ‘83 teammates to the senior national team, then known as the Green Eagles.

Same year, he made his national team debut against Morocco in a 1984 Africa Cup of Nations qualifier.

How did it happen? The Eagles had been held 0-0 in Benin City in the first leg and for the return leg, coach Adegboye Onigbinde and his assistant James Peters invited some members from the Flying Eagles of that year’s U-20 World Cup, including Sofoluwe.

The others were Ehilegbu, Tajudeen Disu, Okoku, Agbonavbare, Okorowanta and Humphrey Edobor.

Nobody gave the side, made up largely of rookies, a chance but a gutsy display by the lads earned them another goalless stalemate, but they qualified for the AFCON after overcoming the North Africans on penalties.

The man who gave Sofoluwe his first Nigeria cap Onigbinde said the defender’s attitude to work won him over.

“He was well-behaved, dedicated and hardworking, these were some of the qualities that made me admire him, “Onigbinde told Saturday PUNCH.

Onigbinde’s move to give the youngsters a chance at top level continental football worked wonders at the AFCON tournament proper as well.

Sofoluwe was in the thick of the action as Nigeria reached the final of the 1984 Africa Cup of Nations in Ivory Coast, only to lose 3-1 to a Theophile Abega and Roger Milla inspired Cameroon.

On the way to the final, he scored his penalty kick in the Eagles hard-fought 8-7 shootout defeat of Egypt after score stood at 2-2 after extra time in the semi-finals.

Sofoluwe played alongside some of the country’s most revered and feared defenders and was the Eagles most consistent left-back between 1983 and 1988.

He, alongside inspirational captain Stephen Keshi, with their calm demeanour, brought a balance to ‘Benin Boys’ Sunday Eboigbe, Bright Omokaro and Austin Eguavoen’s rugged and hard-stance style.

“He (Sofoluwe) was one of the quiet ones in camp,” national teammate Samson Siasia told Saturday PUNCH.

“He was clean and neat with his tackles. He was a very smart footballer; the only defender I think never had a yellow card.”

Truly, Sofoluwe was the quintessential tough guy — strong, silent and self-contained.

At just 5ft8in, he was petite for a defender, but he made up with his skills, hard work, dedication and commitment on the pitch.

Try him for size at your peril. Strikers of his era still have stories to tell about their confrontations with the late defender till this day.

He was also very versatile and proved his mettle at centre-back, a position usually dominated by towering and domineering defenders.

“Judging from his height, you would think he won’t be able to play in central defence. But he played that role very well too. He was awesome,” Siasia added.

Fittingly, legendary radio commentator Ernest Okonkwo nicknamed him the Dean of Defence.

He also featured as the Eagles reached the final of the 1988 AFCON in Morocco, and racked up 40 international caps overall, with one goal to his credit, scored in the 3-1 defeat of Kenya in a 1986 World Cup qualification fixture.

At club level, the fallen star played for ITT Lagos (1982-83), Abiola Babes (1984-87), where he reached four FA Cup finals, winning two in 1985 and 1987, and Julius Berger (1988) on the domestic scene.

During an era when Belgium became the Mecca of Nigerian stars, Sofoluwe moved to the European country, where he first starred for RFC Namur between 1990 and 1992. He also played for Royal Union Hutoise (1993-94), RFC Lessine (1994-96) and Winterslag (1988-89), all in Belgium.

He was part of a generation that played for the love of the game and not for the lure of money.

But then, football was not the big business it is now, in this part of the world.

He didn’t make the megabucks, and that would later affect him on retirement, just like most stars of his era.

Lagos landlords want their rents paid as at when due, not listening to stories about past exploits on the pitch.

Gist has it that Sofoluwe had a couple of rent issues and was forced to move from Ikotun to Ikorodu, where he got a cheaper apartment, before his death.

At his burial, only a handful of his ex-teammates, ex-internationals and friends joined his wife, Busola, and their two kids to bid Sofoluwe bye.

It didn’t come as a shock to the Nigerian football faithful though. It’s become a standard for Nigerian sports officials to abandon their dead heroes during their burial rites.

It happened in the case of the late Stephen Keshi in 2016, former Super Falcons captain, Ifeanyi Chiejine, who died in 2020, and most recently Senegal 1992 AFCON defender Ajibade Babalade, who was buried in Ibadan last month.

“None of the NFF officials came for the burial. Seyi Akinwunmi (NFF VP) said he wasn’t aware today (Wednesday) was his burial. I called him and he said he wasn’t aware, I told him that he should know since Sofoluwe was a Muslim. We didn’t see anybody,” Jide Oguntuase, a member of the Scotland 1989 Golden Eaglets, told The PUNCH on Wednesday.

Remember how late South African goalkeeper Senzo Meyiwa, who played just seven times for his country, was given a befitting state burial, after he was shot dead on October 26, 2014?

Prior to his burial, Meyiwa’s body received a guard of honour in the streets of Umlazi, his hometown.

In Nigeria, it’s the reverse: the Sofoluwe, the Dean of Defence, departed as the unsung hero.

Copyright PUNCH.

All rights reserved. This material, and other digital content on this website, may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from PUNCH.

Contact: theeditor@punchng.com
https://punchng.com/sofoluwe-the-unsung ... f-defence/

Sad, he was an unsung hero and photos in his later years revealed he was struggling. It's a shame that there was no one there for him in his hour of need. I think like minded people should come together and do a GoFundMe for his family.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2021 10:38 pm 
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Dammy wrote:
Yisa was one of the best ever players to don the GWG of Nigeria yet he doesn't seem to get the recognition his talents deserve.
One of the best compliments paid to him was by John Fashanu, when he was invited to play for the SE in 1985 against Tunisia in a crucial WCQ. After training with Shofoluwe, he said that Yisa was a better player than Kenny Sansom of Arsenal and England. Fashanu was playing in the old English first division ( now EPL) and had played against Sansom, and was therefore in a position to compare both players.
He was unhurried in his play, read the game to perfection, had no need for last ditch tackles and played both RB and LB for the SE. He came before his time and if he was playing today, he would be playing for some of the biggest teams in Europe..
Nigeria has produced some great LBs like Okey Isima Benedict Iroha, Celestine Babayaro, Ifeanyi Udeze, Taiye Taiwo etc but Anobi Yisa Shofoluwe, IMO is the best LB Nigeria has ever produced.
May his soul Rest in Peace.


The same Justin Fashanu denied knowing Anobi Yisa when he turned up at Heathrow airport and claimed Justin had invited him to the UK. He was turned back at the airport.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2021 2:23 am 
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Lolly wrote:
Dammy wrote:
Yisa was one of the best ever players to don the GWG of Nigeria yet he doesn't seem to get the recognition his talents deserve.
One of the best compliments paid to him was by John Fashanu, when he was invited to play for the SE in 1985 against Tunisia in a crucial WCQ. After training with Shofoluwe, he said that Yisa was a better player than Kenny Sansom of Arsenal and England. Fashanu was playing in the old English first division ( now EPL) and had played against Sansom, and was therefore in a position to compare both players.
He was unhurried in his play, read the game to perfection, had no need for last ditch tackles and played both RB and LB for the SE. He came before his time and if he was playing today, he would be playing for some of the biggest teams in Europe..
Nigeria has produced some great LBs like Okey Isima Benedict Iroha, Celestine Babayaro, Ifeanyi Udeze, Taiye Taiwo etc but Anobi Yisa Shofoluwe, IMO is the best LB Nigeria has ever produced.
May his soul Rest in Peace.


The same Justin Fashanu denied knowing Anobi Yisa when he turned up at Heathrow airport and claimed Justin had invited him to the UK. He was turned back at the airport.

Typical John Fashanu, probably promised more than he could deliver.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2021 9:03 am 
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Toxicarrow wrote:
Sofoluwe: The unsung Dean of Defence
Published February 13, 2021
Kindly Share This Story

In this report, ’TANA AIYEJINA takes a look at the illustrious career of late ex-Super Eagles defender Yisa Sofoluwe, who was buried on Wednesday in Lagos

The big wigs of Nigerian football or top government officials were not there, neither was the fanfare and ceremony usually associated with the burial of a national hero, during Yisa Sofoluwe’s burial on Wednesday at Atan Cemetery, Yaba, Lagos.

Yet, this was a man who toiled for close to a decade in his quest to put the country’s name on the global football map.

Former Super Eagles defender Sofoluwe died on Tuesday evening at the Intensive Care Unit of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, after being diagnosed with mild cerebral atrophy, a brain disease. He died at the of age 53.

The retired footballer paid his dues after an illustrious national team and club careers.

Sofoluwe was part of a generation of youngsters that represented Nigeria at the country’s first appearance at a FIFA World Cup, the U-20 version, in Mexico, in 1983.

Spotting the No.6 jersey, left-back Sofoluwe played alongside some of the country’s most talented players like Chibuzor Ehilegbu, Tarila Okorowanta, captain Ali Jeje, Wilfred Agbonavbare, Paul Okoku, amongst others in Mexico.

The first timers were seen as underdogs, but they proved their critics wrong in the ensuing games against more fancied opponents.

They beat huge favourites USSR 1-0, lost 3-0 to a Brazil side that paraded Bebeto, Dunga and Jorginho, before holding the Netherlands to a goalless stalemate in their final Group D tie.

They crashed out in the group stage, but the young Nigerians had every reason to hold their heads high.

That singular achievement would go on to instill the ‘can do’ spirit in the country’s array of young and talented footballers.

And it ushered in amazing success stories in youth football just two years later, as the Flying Eagles claimed bronze at the U-20 World Cup in Russia, while the Golden Eaglets claimed the first U-17 World Cup in China.

Sofoluwe got instant promotion alongside several of his Moscow ‘83 teammates to the senior national team, then known as the Green Eagles.

Same year, he made his national team debut against Morocco in a 1984 Africa Cup of Nations qualifier.

How did it happen? The Eagles had been held 0-0 in Benin City in the first leg and for the return leg, coach Adegboye Onigbinde and his assistant James Peters invited some members from the Flying Eagles of that year’s U-20 World Cup, including Sofoluwe.

The others were Ehilegbu, Tajudeen Disu, Okoku, Agbonavbare, Okorowanta and Humphrey Edobor.

Nobody gave the side, made up largely of rookies, a chance but a gutsy display by the lads earned them another goalless stalemate, but they qualified for the AFCON after overcoming the North Africans on penalties.

The man who gave Sofoluwe his first Nigeria cap Onigbinde said the defender’s attitude to work won him over.

“He was well-behaved, dedicated and hardworking, these were some of the qualities that made me admire him, “Onigbinde told Saturday PUNCH.

Onigbinde’s move to give the youngsters a chance at top level continental football worked wonders at the AFCON tournament proper as well.

Sofoluwe was in the thick of the action as Nigeria reached the final of the 1984 Africa Cup of Nations in Ivory Coast, only to lose 3-1 to a Theophile Abega and Roger Milla inspired Cameroon.

On the way to the final, he scored his penalty kick in the Eagles hard-fought 8-7 shootout defeat of Egypt after score stood at 2-2 after extra time in the semi-finals.

Sofoluwe played alongside some of the country’s most revered and feared defenders and was the Eagles most consistent left-back between 1983 and 1988.

He, alongside inspirational captain Stephen Keshi, with their calm demeanour, brought a balance to ‘Benin Boys’ Sunday Eboigbe, Bright Omokaro and Austin Eguavoen’s rugged and hard-stance style.

“He (Sofoluwe) was one of the quiet ones in camp,” national teammate Samson Siasia told Saturday PUNCH.

“He was clean and neat with his tackles. He was a very smart footballer; the only defender I think never had a yellow card.”

Truly, Sofoluwe was the quintessential tough guy — strong, silent and self-contained.

At just 5ft8in, he was petite for a defender, but he made up with his skills, hard work, dedication and commitment on the pitch.

Try him for size at your peril. Strikers of his era still have stories to tell about their confrontations with the late defender till this day.

He was also very versatile and proved his mettle at centre-back, a position usually dominated by towering and domineering defenders.

“Judging from his height, you would think he won’t be able to play in central defence. But he played that role very well too. He was awesome,” Siasia added.

Fittingly, legendary radio commentator Ernest Okonkwo nicknamed him the Dean of Defence.

He also featured as the Eagles reached the final of the 1988 AFCON in Morocco, and racked up 40 international caps overall, with one goal to his credit, scored in the 3-1 defeat of Kenya in a 1986 World Cup qualification fixture.

At club level, the fallen star played for ITT Lagos (1982-83), Abiola Babes (1984-87), where he reached four FA Cup finals, winning two in 1985 and 1987, and Julius Berger (1988) on the domestic scene.

During an era when Belgium became the Mecca of Nigerian stars, Sofoluwe moved to the European country, where he first starred for RFC Namur between 1990 and 1992. He also played for Royal Union Hutoise (1993-94), RFC Lessine (1994-96) and Winterslag (1988-89), all in Belgium.

He was part of a generation that played for the love of the game and not for the lure of money.

But then, football was not the big business it is now, in this part of the world.

He didn’t make the megabucks, and that would later affect him on retirement, just like most stars of his era.

Lagos landlords want their rents paid as at when due, not listening to stories about past exploits on the pitch.

Gist has it that Sofoluwe had a couple of rent issues and was forced to move from Ikotun to Ikorodu, where he got a cheaper apartment, before his death.

At his burial, only a handful of his ex-teammates, ex-internationals and friends joined his wife, Busola, and their two kids to bid Sofoluwe bye.

It didn’t come as a shock to the Nigerian football faithful though. It’s become a standard for Nigerian sports officials to abandon their dead heroes during their burial rites.

It happened in the case of the late Stephen Keshi in 2016, former Super Falcons captain, Ifeanyi Chiejine, who died in 2020, and most recently Senegal 1992 AFCON defender Ajibade Babalade, who was buried in Ibadan last month.

“None of the NFF officials came for the burial. Seyi Akinwunmi (NFF VP) said he wasn’t aware today (Wednesday) was his burial. I called him and he said he wasn’t aware, I told him that he should know since Sofoluwe was a Muslim. We didn’t see anybody,” Jide Oguntuase, a member of the Scotland 1989 Golden Eaglets, told The PUNCH on Wednesday.

Remember how late South African goalkeeper Senzo Meyiwa, who played just seven times for his country, was given a befitting state burial, after he was shot dead on October 26, 2014?

Prior to his burial, Meyiwa’s body received a guard of honour in the streets of Umlazi, his hometown.

In Nigeria, it’s the reverse: the Sofoluwe, the Dean of Defence, departed as the unsung hero.

Copyright PUNCH.

All rights reserved. This material, and other digital content on this website, may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from PUNCH.

Contact: theeditor@punchng.com
https://punchng.com/sofoluwe-the-unsung ... f-defence/


I think it is a bit unfair to complain about people's absence at the burial considering the pandemic and the protocols. We should actually be worried if we had a crowd at the burial.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2021 10:05 pm 
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RIP.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2021 12:32 pm 
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Once again RIP dean of defence.

You want to know why some maybe hesitant to wear the GWG when they have potential options - look at how we treat our heroes after the hang their boots. When they become coaches we hesitate to pay them on time or even give the same opportunities as a 3rd rate journey man because of the colour of his skin.

If I had a child who was good enough to be in a position to choose to play or represent more than one country including Nigeria I will ask him or her to consider very deeply before making a choice.

We have a disgraceful history of how we treat our own.

Sorry for the rant.

Once again RIP to one of Nigeria’s finest to do it.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2021 1:10 pm 
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May his soul Rest In The Perfect Peace Of Christ.

One of the truly great Nigerian players of his era. He will be missed.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 21, 2021 9:07 am 
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hestonap wrote:
Once again RIP dean of defence.

You want to know why some maybe hesitant to wear the GWG when they have potential options - look at how we treat our heroes after the hang their boots. When they become coaches we hesitate to pay them on time or even give the same opportunities as a 3rd rate journey man because of the colour of his skin.

If I had a child who was good enough to be in a position to choose to play or represent more than one country including Nigeria I will ask him or her to consider very deeply before making a choice.

We have a disgraceful history of how we treat our own.

Sorry for the rant.

Once again RIP to one of Nigeria’s finest to do it.
In today's world of football, nobody should be waiting for a government to "take care of them" after they retire.
These are professional footballers, not the amateurs of yore.

Those that reached the pinnacle of their careers back then were more than amply rewarded by governments - state and federal in ways which were pretty unique to Nigeria. I don't think any government is obliged to do anything other than give recognition and appreciation of your status as a national sportsman.
It is up to you to secure your own future.
Life sucks like that.

May his soul RIP.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2021 4:23 pm 
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Damunk wrote:
hestonap wrote:
Once again RIP dean of defence.

You want to know why some maybe hesitant to wear the GWG when they have potential options - look at how we treat our heroes after the hang their boots. When they become coaches we hesitate to pay them on time or even give the same opportunities as a 3rd rate journey man because of the colour of his skin.

If I had a child who was good enough to be in a position to choose to play or represent more than one country including Nigeria I will ask him or her to consider very deeply before making a choice.

We have a disgraceful history of how we treat our own.

Sorry for the rant.

Once again RIP to one of Nigeria’s finest to do it.
In today's world of football, nobody should be waiting for a government to "take care of them" after they retire.
These are professional footballers, not the amateurs of yore.

Those that reached the pinnacle of their careers back then were more than amply rewarded by governments - state and federal in ways which were pretty unique to Nigeria. I don't think any government is obliged to do anything other than give recognition and appreciation of your status as a national sportsman.
It is up to you to secure your own future.
Life sucks like that.

May his soul RIP.



That is exactly why those who represent these footballers must work with them to contribute towards their retirement when they are fit and earning for the rainy day. I just find it surprising this constant request for the state to do this and do that. If you are a professional footballer then contribute to a retirement fund when you are still active or alternatively save.

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The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
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