Cybereagles

The Undisputed Number One Home for All Super Eagles Fans
It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 12:09 pm

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2014 1:05 am 
Offline
Suspended Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 9:54 pm
Posts: 8190
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.

_________________
YUJAM wrote:
I've been wearing my Egypt avatar with pride

YUJAM the pharaoh
amafolas wrote:
are you sure it is People Destroying People and not Politicians Destroying People

"So long as I need to ask you once Lord Snow; are you a brother of Night's Watch or a *kindperson* boy who wants to play at war!?"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2014 1:49 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 5:57 pm
Posts: 34006
Location: UK
ElHadary wrote:
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.
People that dismiss any positives out of Africa with the 'moral victory' put-down are too blinkered to see how they can use simple observations like this point you've made as a foundation on which to build something bigger and better.

For me, this world cup has brought the realisation that there are three little things making big differences in outcomes between two teams that are otherwise really much closer in ability than we tend to think.

1. The Individual genius - the Messi, the Neymar, Suarez or the Rodriguez can be the one major difference between a football Superpower and a so-called 'minnow'. Take them out of the equation, no difference.

2. The Ref. I don't think they are overtly biased, but I do think they are prone to give the benefit of the doubt to the more established soccer powers as against the minnows. These are very subtle refereeing calls, almost insignificant on a call-by-call basis, but they do all add up eventually and constitute an 'institutional' bias towards lesser football powers. All of the four semifinalists could easily have been home by now if little calls had not gone their way.

3. Self-belief. The soccer powers almost always believe they can overcome no matter how much pressure they find themselves put under by the lesser teams. It is what has helped them through. That self belief comes from years of dominance and almost an arrogance. No truly great player does not have an arrogance about him. Its a mind set, and teams also display it. Again, Argentina (over Iran), Germany (over Ghana), Brazil (over Chile & Colombia) and The Netherlands (over Puerto Rico) have all had that little extra self belief that made the marginal difference over their opponents.


But the cynics will simply throw up 'moral victory' jibes as if they are contributing something of substance to the debate.

_________________
"Ole ni gbogbo won"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:52 pm 
Offline
Suspended Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2009 9:54 pm
Posts: 8190
So, about this...

_________________
YUJAM wrote:
I've been wearing my Egypt avatar with pride

YUJAM the pharaoh
amafolas wrote:
are you sure it is People Destroying People and not Politicians Destroying People

"So long as I need to ask you once Lord Snow; are you a brother of Night's Watch or a *kindperson* boy who wants to play at war!?"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 11:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:59 pm
Posts: 29931
That poor officiating SE vs France and also Algeria vs Germany.If those ref were on point I know big Boss will be in final today or the Algerian team


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 11:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 11:22 pm
Posts: 10890
Damunk wrote:
ElHadary wrote:
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.
People that dismiss any positives out of Africa with the 'moral victory' put-down are too blinkered to see how they can use simple observations like this point you've made as a foundation on which to build something bigger and better.

For me, this world cup has brought the realisation that there are three little things making big differences in outcomes between two teams that are otherwise really much closer in ability than we tend to think.

1. The Individual genius - the Messi, the Neymar, Suarez or the Rodriguez can be the one major difference between a football Superpower and a so-called 'minnow'. Take them out of the equation, no difference.

2. The Ref. I don't think they are overtly biased, but I do think they are prone to give the benefit of the doubt to the more established soccer powers as against the minnows. These are very subtle refereeing calls, almost insignificant on a call-by-call basis, but they do all add up eventually and constitute an 'institutional' bias towards lesser football powers. All of the four semifinalists could easily have been home by now if little calls had not gone their way.

3. Self-belief. The soccer powers almost always believe they can overcome no matter how much pressure they find themselves put under by the lesser teams. It is what has helped them through. That self belief comes from years of dominance and almost an arrogance. No truly great player does not have an arrogance about him. Its a mind set, and teams also display it. Again, Argentina (over Iran), Germany (over Ghana), Brazil (over Chile & Colombia) and The Netherlands (over Puerto Rico) have all had that little extra self belief that made the marginal difference over their opponents.


But the cynics will simply throw up 'moral victory' jibes as if they are contributing something of substance to the debate.


Puerto Rico dey tap soccer :rotf:

But I agree with your two key points self-belief and winning mentality. Something that is lacking in many African teams.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 12:37 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:34 pm
Posts: 2771
This World Cup was a watershed moment. This World Cup could easily have been won by Chile, Colombia, or Costa Rica teams which were all well organized and well coached. Expect the traditional teams to lose dominance in future World Cups as teams now see the FIFA senior world cup edition as no different than the U-23 WYC where even Saudi Arabia has made the finals.

African teams need to get mentally stronger. Ghana should be cursing themselves for losing their heads after the 2-1 defeat to the USA and the draw to Germany. Had they beaten Portugal they could easily be playing in a semi-final instead of watching it at home. Nigeria also lacked attacking finesse and an on-field leader to carry them over the hump in the winnable semi-final against France. Otherwise, Nigeria had the players to challenge for the Cup.

_________________
O na-abu ife na-eme ufodu e ekolopu anyi adi elota n’ife obuna nwelu mbido ga enwelili njedebe - Celestine Ukwu

“The sun will shine on those who stand before it shines on those who kneel under them." -- Chinua Achebe


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 6:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2004 1:29 am
Posts: 9544
Location: Indiana
Damunk wrote:
ElHadary wrote:
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.
People that dismiss any positives out of Africa with the 'moral victory' put-down are too blinkered to see how they can use simple observations like this point you've made as a foundation on which to build something bigger and better.

For me, this world cup has brought the realisation that there are three little things making big differences in outcomes between two teams that are otherwise really much closer in ability than we tend to think.

1. The Individual genius - the Messi, the Neymar, Suarez or the Rodriguez can be the one major difference between a football Superpower and a so-called 'minnow'. Take them out of the equation, no difference.

2. The Ref. I don't think they are overtly biased, but I do think they are prone to give the benefit of the doubt to the more established soccer powers as against the minnows. These are very subtle refereeing calls, almost insignificant on a call-by-call basis, but they do all add up eventually and constitute an 'institutional' bias towards lesser football powers. All of the four semifinalists could easily have been home by now if little calls had not gone their way.

3. Self-belief. The soccer powers almost always believe they can overcome no matter how much pressure they find themselves put under by the lesser teams. It is what has helped them through. That self belief comes from years of dominance and almost an arrogance. No truly great player does not have an arrogance about him. Its a mind set, and teams also display it. Again, Argentina (over Iran), Germany (over Ghana), Brazil (over Chile & Colombia) and The Netherlands (over Puerto Rico) have all had that little extra self belief that made the marginal difference over their opponents.


But the cynics will simply throw up 'moral victory' jibes as if they are contributing something of substance to the debate.


I can't believe I missed this gem of a post. I kpom all three points.
On the last point. Think of Nigeria and ANC. Think of how consistently we have gotten to the semi since 1976 even when we had really crappy teams. Think of all the talented smaller african teams that we manage to always edge out on the way there. That's the power of self-belief and pedigree. On the world level, we lack that; teams like Germany have it. Their consistency, like ours at the ANC, is not down to talent and quality alone, but also on a self-belief so strong it borders on entitlement.

_________________
"We will go through the gate. If the gate is closed, we will go over the fence. If the fence is too high, we will pole vault in. If that doesn’t work, we will parachute in. But we are going to get health-care reform passed"
Nancy Pelosi, 01/28/2010 after Scott Brown got elected to Ted Kennedy's senate seat.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 7:01 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 5:57 pm
Posts: 34006
Location: UK
JMObi wrote:
This World Cup was a watershed moment. This World Cup could easily have been won by Chile, Colombia, or Costa Rica teams which were all well organized and well coached. Expect the traditional teams to lose dominance in future World Cups as teams now see the FIFA senior world cup edition as no different than the U-23 WYC where even Saudi Arabia has made the finals.
KPOM!!! Yes o. That belief is surely growing. I just can't understand why Cote D'Ivoire, of all the African teams, didn't have it.

Quote:
African teams need to get mentally stronger. Ghana should be cursing themselves for losing their heads after the 2-1 defeat to the USA and the draw to Germany. Had they beaten Portugal they could easily be playing in a semi-final instead of watching it at home. Nigeria also lacked attacking finesse and an on-field leader to carry them over the hump in the winnable semi-final against France. Otherwise, Nigeria had the players to challenge for the Cup.
Excellent point. I just wish I had recorded that Ghana game.

_________________
"Ole ni gbogbo won"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 7:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2004 1:29 am
Posts: 9544
Location: Indiana
Damunk wrote:
JMObi wrote:
This World Cup was a watershed moment. This World Cup could easily have been won by Chile, Colombia, or Costa Rica teams which were all well organized and well coached. Expect the traditional teams to lose dominance in future World Cups as teams now see the FIFA senior world cup edition as no different than the U-23 WYC where even Saudi Arabia has made the finals.
KPOM!!! Yes o. That belief is surely growing. I just can't understand why Cote D'Ivoire, of all the African teams, didn't have it.

Quote:
African teams need to get mentally stronger. Ghana should be cursing themselves for losing their heads after the 2-1 defeat to the USA and the draw to Germany. Had they beaten Portugal they could easily be playing in a semi-final instead of watching it at home. Nigeria also lacked attacking finesse and an on-field leader to carry them over the hump in the winnable semi-final against France. Otherwise, Nigeria had the players to challenge for the Cup.
Excellent point. I just wish I had recorded that Ghana game.

These current Ivorians are mental midgets. what a shame.

_________________
"We will go through the gate. If the gate is closed, we will go over the fence. If the fence is too high, we will pole vault in. If that doesn’t work, we will parachute in. But we are going to get health-care reform passed"
Nancy Pelosi, 01/28/2010 after Scott Brown got elected to Ted Kennedy's senate seat.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 7:16 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2003 5:59 pm
Posts: 41144
Location: Nembe Creek...Oil Exploration. If you call am bunkering na you sabi.
Damunk wrote:
ElHadary wrote:
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.
People that dismiss any positives out of Africa with the 'moral victory' put-down are too blinkered to see how they can use simple observations like this point you've made as a foundation on which to build something bigger and better.

For me, this world cup has brought the realisation that there are three little things making big differences in outcomes between two teams that are otherwise really much closer in ability than we tend to think.

1. The Individual genius - the Messi, the Neymar, Suarez or the Rodriguez can be the one major difference between a football Superpower and a so-called 'minnow'. Take them out of the equation, no difference.

2. The Ref. I don't think they are overtly biased, but I do think they are prone to give the benefit of the doubt to the more established soccer powers as against the minnows. These are very subtle refereeing calls, almost insignificant on a call-by-call basis, but they do all add up eventually and constitute an 'institutional' bias towards lesser football powers. All of the four semifinalists could easily have been home by now if little calls had not gone their way.

3. Self-belief. The soccer powers almost always believe they can overcome no matter how much pressure they find themselves put under by the lesser teams. It is what has helped them through. That self belief comes from years of dominance and almost an arrogance. No truly great player does not have an arrogance about him. Its a mind set, and teams also display it. Again, Argentina (over Iran), Germany (over Ghana), Brazil (over Chile & Colombia) and The Netherlands (over Puerto Rico) have all had that little extra self belief that made the marginal difference over their opponents.


But the cynics will simply throw up 'moral victory' jibes as if they are contributing something of substance to the debate.


Doc, excellent points.

One day we will go to a WC with a singular focus and little or no off field distractions...

_________________
I pledge to Nigeria my country
To be faithful, loyal and honest
To serve Nigeria with all my strength
To defend her unity and uphold her honor and glory
So help me God.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 11:59 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2003 5:02 pm
Posts: 10011
Location: Around the World
We can't organize elections, we can't organize the league, we can't maintain our roads, we can't maintain our airports, we can't enforce law and order, we can't provide security for our citizens, we can't organize sports programs, and Nigeria is going to miraculously organize ourselves to win the World Cup ? The same World Cup that pretty much every European and South American Country is trying to win?
At some point, we have to try and be a tad bit realistic...



Cellular wrote:
Damunk wrote:
ElHadary wrote:
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.
People that dismiss any positives out of Africa with the 'moral victory' put-down are too blinkered to see how they can use simple observations like this point you've made as a foundation on which to build something bigger and better.

For me, this world cup has brought the realisation that there are three little things making big differences in outcomes between two teams that are otherwise really much closer in ability than we tend to think.

1. The Individual genius - the Messi, the Neymar, Suarez or the Rodriguez can be the one major difference between a football Superpower and a so-called 'minnow'. Take them out of the equation, no difference.

2. The Ref. I don't think they are overtly biased, but I do think they are prone to give the benefit of the doubt to the more established soccer powers as against the minnows. These are very subtle refereeing calls, almost insignificant on a call-by-call basis, but they do all add up eventually and constitute an 'institutional' bias towards lesser football powers. All of the four semifinalists could easily have been home by now if little calls had not gone their way.

3. Self-belief. The soccer powers almost always believe they can overcome no matter how much pressure they find themselves put under by the lesser teams. It is what has helped them through. That self belief comes from years of dominance and almost an arrogance. No truly great player does not have an arrogance about him. Its a mind set, and teams also display it. Again, Argentina (over Iran), Germany (over Ghana), Brazil (over Chile & Colombia) and The Netherlands (over Puerto Rico) have all had that little extra self belief that made the marginal difference over their opponents.


But the cynics will simply throw up 'moral victory' jibes as if they are contributing something of substance to the debate.


Doc, excellent points.

One day we will go to a WC with a singular focus and little or no off field distractions...

_________________
http://www.turenchi.com for Nigerian News


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 7:10 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 5:57 pm
Posts: 34006
Location: UK
You are too young to have lost faith in your people to such a degree.
One day it will happen and you will be there to witness it.
Say 'Amen!' :taunt:
nanijoe wrote:
We can't organize elections, we can't organize the league, we can't maintain our roads, we can't maintain our airports, we can't enforce law and order, we can't provide security for our citizens, we can't organize sports programs, and Nigeria is going to miraculously organize ourselves to win the World Cup ? The same World Cup that pretty much every European and South American Country is trying to win?
At some point, we have to try and be a tad bit realistic...



Cellular wrote:
Damunk wrote:
ElHadary wrote:
Despite people saying Africa places too much into moral victories and porous displays please keep in mind...

The two teams that gave Germany the most difficulty thus far in this tournament have been Ghana and Algeria.
People that dismiss any positives out of Africa with the 'moral victory' put-down are too blinkered to see how they can use simple observations like this point you've made as a foundation on which to build something bigger and better.

For me, this world cup has brought the realisation that there are three little things making big differences in outcomes between two teams that are otherwise really much closer in ability than we tend to think.

1. The Individual genius - the Messi, the Neymar, Suarez or the Rodriguez can be the one major difference between a football Superpower and a so-called 'minnow'. Take them out of the equation, no difference.

2. The Ref. I don't think they are overtly biased, but I do think they are prone to give the benefit of the doubt to the more established soccer powers as against the minnows. These are very subtle refereeing calls, almost insignificant on a call-by-call basis, but they do all add up eventually and constitute an 'institutional' bias towards lesser football powers. All of the four semifinalists could easily have been home by now if little calls had not gone their way.

3. Self-belief. The soccer powers almost always believe they can overcome no matter how much pressure they find themselves put under by the lesser teams. It is what has helped them through. That self belief comes from years of dominance and almost an arrogance. No truly great player does not have an arrogance about him. Its a mind set, and teams also display it. Again, Argentina (over Iran), Germany (over Ghana), Brazil (over Chile & Colombia) and The Netherlands (over Puerto Rico) have all had that little extra self belief that made the marginal difference over their opponents.


But the cynics will simply throw up 'moral victory' jibes as if they are contributing something of substance to the debate.


Doc, excellent points.

One day we will go to a WC with a singular focus and little or no off field distractions...

_________________
"Ole ni gbogbo won"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 5:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 1:55 am
Posts: 27956
Location: Canada
nanijoe preach truth! Everyone seems to have forgotten that despite all the gra-gra of the small pikins in the opening rounds, the same-old, same-old appeared in the final four. Na magic?

_________________
Image
Visit my blog at http://www.soccergoat.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 2:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2004 11:09 pm
Posts: 28011
Location: Yola
Cameroon even drew with Germany just before the tournament.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 2:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 4:18 pm
Posts: 829
If you read an interview by Oliver Berhoff on espn soccernet, you'll undertand why Germany does well. This what Berhoff said.
1) They have developed a mobile app for their national team that allows them to analyze the games of their opponents.
2) The app allows them to analyze every game Germany has played and give each player immediate feed back on their performance following a game. This way, a player can review the positives asn negatives of their game immediately following a game and individually.
3) A player can request and be given an analysis of the way a player he is going to mark typically plays. For example, he says Boateng requested an analysis of Benzema's moves in the last third of the field before the game against France. With their app, they can give him video streams and likely actions he'd take on the field.
4) Their application showed them that the French tended to crowd the midfield but leave gaping holes before the defence. They exploited this.

So, why did they struggle against Ghana and Algeria and even Cameroon in a friendly? MY suspicion is that they did not have enough matches on these teams for the application to help them analyze and predict likely behavior during the game.

It seems to me the Germans are using technology to take them to another level. Other teams will follow suit and very quickly.

_________________
"If you aren't keeping the score
you're only practising". Hugh Collum, Finance Director, SmithKline Beecham.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 2:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2004 11:09 pm
Posts: 28011
Location: Yola
smallpikin wrote:
If you read an interview by Oliver Berhoff on espn soccernet, you'll undertand why Germany does well. This what Berhoff said.
1) They have developed a mobile app for their national team that allows them to analyze the games of their opponents.
2) The app allows them to analyze every game Germany has played and give each player immediate feed back on their performance following a game. This way, a player can review the positives asn negatives of their game immediately following a game and individually.
3) A player can request and be given an analysis of the way a player he is going to mark typically plays. For example, he says Boateng requested an analysis of Benzema's moves in the last third of the field before the game against France. With their app, they can give him video streams and likely actions he'd take on the field.
4) Their application showed them that the French tended to crowd the midfield but leave gaping holes before the defence. They exploited this.

So, why did they struggle against Ghana and Algeria and even Cameroon in a friendly? MY suspicion is that they did not have enough matches on these teams for the application to help them analyze and predict likely behavior during the game.

It seems to me the Germans are using technology to take them to another level. Other teams will follow suit and very quickly.
could be true. I had the impression that other have improved. Not that Brazil is that bad.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 3:15 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2004 11:33 pm
Posts: 15052
smallpikin wrote:
If you read an interview by Oliver Berhoff on espn soccernet, you'll undertand why Germany does well. This what Berhoff said.
1) They have developed a mobile app for their national team that allows them to analyze the games of their opponents.
2) The app allows them to analyze every game Germany has played and give each player immediate feed back on their performance following a game. This way, a player can review the positives asn negatives of their game immediately following a game and individually.
3) A player can request and be given an analysis of the way a player he is going to mark typically plays. For example, he says Boateng requested an analysis of Benzema's moves in the last third of the field before the game against France. With their app, they can give him video streams and likely actions he'd take on the field.
4) Their application showed them that the French tended to crowd the midfield but leave gaping holes before the defence. They exploited this.

So, why did they struggle against Ghana and Algeria and even Cameroon in a friendly? MY suspicion is that they did not have enough matches on these teams for the application to help them analyze and predict likely behavior during the game.

It seems to me the Germans are using technology to take them to another level. Other teams will follow suit and very quickly.



SAP has such an application that indeed is monitoring games and analyzing them, using several models, and database of past games, statistics, and player profiles. They are currently only letting the German NT use it, but will sell it commercially after the WC. They even market it as a big data application.

This goes back to the dimension of program management. A good NT program uses everything at its disposal. Everything. In fact, I read a recent article in Businessweek how Germany revamped its football program after the 1998 WC debacle. Everything: academies, league, sports science, but especially the way to enable opportunities to identity and develop talent from a pool of 80 million people.

There is no guarantee that this will produce magical talent like Zidane, Messi, and Iniesta. But it obviously will produce the best team possible from the talent that is produced. That can be formidable.

By the way, I know I've been saying that I haven't seen a true German world class player in this WC. I might be wrong. Neur for sure, but Kroos and Hummels seem to be emerging as well. Interestingly enough, that's in the middle, a solid spine if there ever was one.

But still, at this level, the margins are thin. Let's see if it is enough to beat an Argentina that suddenly found catenaccio and a true magician in Messi. For all such investment, it's still clearly not easy to win a WC.

Cheers, Mate

_________________
Pax Americana...Wither Now?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 6:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 4:18 pm
Posts: 829
In South Africa 4 years ago they gave Argentina a 4-0 hiding! It won't be that clearcut this time, but if the Germans score first, Argentina will be finished. You have to be an unknown quantity, like the Africans to come from behind and win against the German machine.

_________________
"If you aren't keeping the score
you're only practising". Hugh Collum, Finance Director, SmithKline Beecham.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 7:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2004 11:09 pm
Posts: 28011
Location: Yola
mate wrote:
smallpikin wrote:
If you read an interview by Oliver Berhoff on espn soccernet, you'll undertand why Germany does well. This what Berhoff said.
1) They have developed a mobile app for their national team that allows them to analyze the games of their opponents.
2) The app allows them to analyze every game Germany has played and give each player immediate feed back on their performance following a game. This way, a player can review the positives asn negatives of their game immediately following a game and individually.
3) A player can request and be given an analysis of the way a player he is going to mark typically plays. For example, he says Boateng requested an analysis of Benzema's moves in the last third of the field before the game against France. With their app, they can give him video streams and likely actions he'd take on the field.
4) Their application showed them that the French tended to crowd the midfield but leave gaping holes before the defence. They exploited this.

So, why did they struggle against Ghana and Algeria and even Cameroon in a friendly? MY suspicion is that they did not have enough matches on these teams for the application to help them analyze and predict likely behavior during the game.

It seems to me the Germans are using technology to take them to another level. Other teams will follow suit and very quickly.



SAP has such an application that indeed is monitoring games and analyzing them, using several models, and database of past games, statistics, and player profiles. They are currently only letting the German NT use it, but will sell it commercially after the WC. They even market it as a big data application.

This goes back to the dimension of program management. A good NT program uses everything at its disposal. Everything. In fact, I read a recent article in Businessweek how Germany revamped its football program after the 1998 WC debacle. Everything: academies, league, sports science, but especially the way to enable opportunities to identity and develop talent from a pool of 80 million people.

There is no guarantee that this will produce magical talent like Zidane, Messi, and Iniesta. But it obviously will produce the best team possible from the talent that is produced. That can be formidable.

By the way, I know I've been saying that I haven't seen a true German world class player in this WC. I might be wrong. Neur for sure, but Kroos and Hummels seem to be emerging as well. Interestingly enough, that's in the middle, a solid spine if there ever was one.

But still, at this level, the margins are thin. Let's see if it is enough to beat an Argentina that suddenly found catenaccio and a true magician in Messi. For all such investment, it's still clearly not easy to win a WC.

Cheers, Mate

http://www.sporttechie.com/2014/07/08/s ... world-cup/

Here is a reference to Bieroff claim:
Quote:
SAP and Germany Make a Big Data Team at the World Cup
July 8, 2014 By Ben Hammonds 1 Comment

inShare
506
Share
germany world cup sap big data
The expectations of the German national team this World Cup has been immense. And it has been building ever since their great run in the European Championship in 2012, where the DFB (German Football Association) was knocked out in the semifinal by the eventual Italian runners up. The entire, soccer crazed, nation of Germany was heartbroken. The German side was chalked full of talent and their people had high hopes of winning a European Championship, but they were denied. This loss hurt, but it also started a fire in the DFB, a fire that has been ever-present in the approach to and during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil.
The DFB wants to win this World Cup; and to ensure that the German players have every possible advantage in Brazil so what did they do? They built their own base camp. Campo Bahia is the name and it has everything that the Germans could need to fuel them to a priceless World Cup victory. The camp is state of the art with housing units for the players and staff, training pitch, fitness center and places where the players can get much needed relaxation after the rigors of World Cup play. The camp is also at an optimal location to reduce the strain of long distance travel across the great country of Brazil.
Campo Bahia is not the only innovative move the DFB has taken to try and be successful in Brazil. The German team is also taking advantage of revolutionary technological leaps of SAP, an enterprise software company founded in Weinheim, Germany and currently holds its headquarters in Walldorf, Germany. SAP is one of the largest software companies in the world and employs over 66,000 people worldwide. SAP is proudly partnering with the German national team to collaborate their technological advances to enhance player performance and boost the chances of Germany winning its 4th World Cup.
SAP is using Big Data to help the German coaching staff make smart decisions on tactics, player fitness, scouting, preparation as well as in game management. SAP has introduced a new concept called SAP Match Insights that assists players and coaches to prepare themselves for upcoming matches by dissecting key situations that may present themselves throughout the course of the match.
To get an idea on how intricate the system is SAP Ambassador and manager of the German national football teamOliver Bierhoff, said, “Imagine this: In just 10 minutes, 10 players with three balls can produce over 7 million data points.” A system this detailed has never been utilized in soccer before and its debut at the World Cup has clearly been influential, seeing Germany into the Semi-Final after escaping the Group of Death along with the United States. After the completion of the World Cup in Brazil, SAP will offer the Match Insights program to other football federations as well as club teams.
Not only is the information gathered by SAP vital for the players and coaching staff of the German national team, but it is also useful for members of the media. We have seen the advancement of handheld media’s ability to give up to the minute stats from Brazil with ESPN FC Essentials and SAP wants to further that capability and help the media deliver even more informed information for their public audiences.
The German national team is ahead of the curve in world football and SAP has been able to help them on their way to the top (and into the Semi-Finals of the World Cup). Stefan Wagner, managing director of SAP Labs in Brazil explained, “The DFB is keen to spearhead this industry transformation. With solutions provided by SAP, together we are perfectly poised for this transformation and a successful World Cup.”


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group