Cybereagles

The Undisputed Number One Home for All Super Eagles Fans
It is currently Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:03 am

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 12:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 12:39 am
Posts: 9340
After 36 years, Thunder Balogun lives on
By Our correspondent
Published: Wednesday, 30 Jul 2008
It is exactly 36 years after the death of the soccer legend Teslim ‘Thunder‘ Balogun . He died on July 30, 1972 at the age of 45.

His family and some Nigerians have been paying glowing tributes to the first Nigerian to play professional football in England at Peterborough United, Holbeach United and Queens Park Rangers and also the first Nigerian coach to lead the national team to the Olympic Games – at Mexico‘68.

He was one of the greatest centre forwards ever produced by Africa and as a coach he discovered talents in the South-West.

A spokesman for the family, Kayode Teslim-Balogun, said that a special prayer would be held for the hero on Wednesday (today) at the family house in Lagos.

A former Super Eagles coach, Adegboye Onigbinde, said the late Thunder was a complete soccer legend who excelled as a player and a coach.

He said, “I was discovered by Teslim Balogun who registered me for a coaching course against my will, but he insisted I would do better as a soccer coach rather than as an athletics coach. And look at me today, in soccer coaching I’m a success story.”

A former athlete and sports philanthropist, Chief Molade Okoya-Thomas, in his own tribute said that Balogun was a born hero whose excellence on the field encouraged many companies in Lagos to float football clubs. Some of the top companies he played for in Lagos were UAC XI, Marines FC, Pan Bank FC and SCOA FC.

Kayode Balogun praised the Lagos State government for the completion of the Teslim Balogun Stadium and a former Military Administrator of Lagos Real Admiral Mike Akhigbe (rtd) for starting the stadium project.

Thunder started his football career in 1944 at age 19 when he played for Apapa Bombers.

He played in eight different first division clubs between 1944 and 1961. He played for the Nigerian national team for 17 years (1945 to 1962).


Punch Newspaper

_________________
Check out Sooting's website:
http://www.3sc.com.ng


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 1:06 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 1:57 am
Posts: 23430
Location: Calif., USA
Excellent!

_________________
Quote:
http://nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html

Keshi said that before the team arrived South Africa that he told skipper Joseph Yobo that the Eagles were going to win the Cup but the former Everton defender did not believe.
:lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 1:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:08 pm
Posts: 7966
Fabulous


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 1:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 4:08 pm
Posts: 6259
Location: Isale Gangan
Toxicarrow wrote:
........ the first Nigerian coach to lead the national team to the Olympic Games – at Mexico‘68.


Your correspondent at the punch got it wrong, I believe. Eto Amechina led the team to Mexico, and Thunder was his assistant. ARA orun re o!

_________________
WHATEVER, WHEREEVER, & WHENEVER, FOREVER ARSENAL! I am an ARSENALIST!
"Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools talk because they have to say something." - Plato


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 1:53 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 04, 2004 5:46 pm
Posts: 16135
Legend.

_________________
Samson Siasia speaking FACTs about 2008.
“I have been waiting for this job for almost three years now and that was before the 2008 Beijing Olympics. I was to be the coach of the Super Eagles after the interview conducted for the job. But that time I said no, I wasn’t ready. Now that I am ready, I am not intimidated at all. I am ready for this job,” he declared matter-of-factly" http://africanfootball.mtnfootball.com/live/content.php?Item_ID=36099


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 6:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2004 2:30 pm
Posts: 5324
Location: Queens Village, New York -Abidjan - Lagos
Toxicarrow wrote:
After 36 years, Thunder Balogun lives on
By Our correspondent
Published: Wednesday, 30 Jul 2008
It is exactly 36 years after the death of the soccer legend Teslim ‘Thunder‘ Balogun . He died on July 30, 1972 at the age of 45.

His family and some Nigerians have been paying glowing tributes to the first Nigerian to play professional football in England at Peterborough United, Holbeach United and Queens Park Rangers and also the first Nigerian coach to lead the national team to the Olympic Games – at Mexico‘68.

He was one of the greatest centre forwards ever produced by Africa and as a coach he discovered talents in the South-West.

A spokesman for the family, Kayode Teslim-Balogun, said that a special prayer would be held for the hero on Wednesday (today) at the family house in Lagos.

A former Super Eagles coach, Adegboye Onigbinde, said the late Thunder was a complete soccer legend who excelled as a player and a coach.

He said, “I was discovered by Teslim Balogun who registered me for a coaching course against my will, but he insisted I would do better as a soccer coach rather than as an athletics coach. And look at me today, in soccer coaching I’m a success story.”

A former athlete and sports philanthropist, Chief Molade Okoya-Thomas, in his own tribute said that Balogun was a born hero whose excellence on the field encouraged many companies in Lagos to float football clubs. Some of the top companies he played for in Lagos were UAC XI, Marines FC, Pan Bank FC and SCOA FC.

Kayode Balogun praised the Lagos State government for the completion of the Teslim Balogun Stadium and a former Military Administrator of Lagos Real Admiral Mike Akhigbe (rtd) for starting the stadium project.

Thunder started his football career in 1944 at age 19 when he played for Apapa Bombers.

He played in eight different first division clubs between 1944 and 1961. He played for the Nigerian national team for 17 years (1945 to 1962).


Punch Newspaper



Anyone has a picture of him? I am dying to see what he looks like. I heard so much about him but never saw him.

Happy Anniversary in heavens. Rest in the bosom of your Lord.

Cheers


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 1:09 pm
Posts: 29419
Thunder!!!!

Don't forget your left 8-) 8-) 8-)

_________________
Oya back to the matter
open and close


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 4:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2004 6:42 am
Posts: 22786
Location: Paradise
:evil: :twisted:
A true legend !! so sad he neva lived long !!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 7:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 4:03 pm
Posts: 2515
Location: At the top of the stairs.
you can see the dude here ... Hard to believe he unleashed those thunderous shots with those heavy balls of yesteryear whilst barefoot... how heavy they got when it rained ... :shock: :shock:

Image

Standing at far left with the UK Tourists.

lukemana wrote:
Toxicarrow wrote:
After 36 years, Thunder Balogun lives on
By Our correspondent
Published: Wednesday, 30 Jul 2008
It is exactly 36 years after the death of the soccer legend Teslim ‘Thunder‘ Balogun . He died on July 30, 1972 at the age of 45.

His family and some Nigerians have been paying glowing tributes to the first Nigerian to play professional football in England at Peterborough United, Holbeach United and Queens Park Rangers and also the first Nigerian coach to lead the national team to the Olympic Games – at Mexico‘68.

He was one of the greatest centre forwards ever produced by Africa and as a coach he discovered talents in the South-West.

A spokesman for the family, Kayode Teslim-Balogun, said that a special prayer would be held for the hero on Wednesday (today) at the family house in Lagos.

A former Super Eagles coach, Adegboye Onigbinde, said the late Thunder was a complete soccer legend who excelled as a player and a coach.

He said, “I was discovered by Teslim Balogun who registered me for a coaching course against my will, but he insisted I would do better as a soccer coach rather than as an athletics coach. And look at me today, in soccer coaching I’m a success story.”

A former athlete and sports philanthropist, Chief Molade Okoya-Thomas, in his own tribute said that Balogun was a born hero whose excellence on the field encouraged many companies in Lagos to float football clubs. Some of the top companies he played for in Lagos were UAC XI, Marines FC, Pan Bank FC and SCOA FC.

Kayode Balogun praised the Lagos State government for the completion of the Teslim Balogun Stadium and a former Military Administrator of Lagos Real Admiral Mike Akhigbe (rtd) for starting the stadium project.

Thunder started his football career in 1944 at age 19 when he played for Apapa Bombers.

He played in eight different first division clubs between 1944 and 1961. He played for the Nigerian national team for 17 years (1945 to 1962).


Punch Newspaper



Anyone has a picture of him? I am dying to see what he looks like. I heard so much about him but never saw him.

Happy Anniversary in heavens. Rest in the bosom of your Lord.

Cheers

_________________
I have seen the future, and it is dirty. Dirty Leeds.

I raised the alarm at work today. The midgets were furious.

I have some new agoraphobic anorexic neighbors; they must have skeletons in their closet.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 9:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2004 2:39 am
Posts: 16551
Location: Super Eagles Homeland
Thunder wrote:
Toxicarrow wrote:
........ the first Nigerian coach to lead the national team to the Olympic Games – at Mexico‘68.


Your correspondent at the punch got it wrong, I believe. Eto Amechina led the team to Mexico, and Thunder was his assistant. ARA orun re o!



Actually, neither Thunder nor Amaechina led the team to the Olympics. However, Thunder was an assistant to the Olympics and he replaced Amaechina in August. Josef Ember was the NT coach at the time, I believe ( ineed tpo check that). Remember that the 1968 Olympics was actually in October of 1968.

Btw, I think there is a lot of myth surrounding Balogun that there is often things that are untrue. For instance, I read a while ago where Onigbinde claimed that Thunder was the first indigenous coach. That was far from the truth as the first indigenous coach was Daniel Anyiam.

The PUNCH story above claims that Thunder played 17 yars for the NT from 1945 to 1962. Again, not true. He could not have played for Nigeria in 1945 as such a team did not exist, the Nigerian Nt did not play its first official game until 1949 (four years later!) on the way back from the England Tour. Then, Thunder played just 8 total games for NIgeria scoring just twice and his career was effectively over by 1960 when he played his last game for Nigeria (v Egypt). By 1962, he had been firnly replaced by Elkanah Onyeali and then briefly buy Chukwuma Igweonu.

In reality, THunder made his name playing in the FA Cup. His records stand today! He was the most prolific striker in the FA Cup and probably won the Cup playing for several teams. That was where he made his name.

_________________
The difficulties of statistical thinking describes a puzzling limitation of our mind: our excessive confidence in what we believe we know, and our apparent inability to acknowledge the full extent of our ignorance and the uncertainty of the world we live in. We are prone to overestimate how much we understand about the world and to underestimate the role of chance in events -- Daniel Kahneman (2011), Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics
Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 9:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 6:20 am
Posts: 28509
Hard Man wrote:
Image

That must be Pa OHSEE and CIC in the shirt and sweater in the back row... :lol:
<


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 12:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2003 8:25 pm
Posts: 49550
Now 41 years...

Quote:
Thunder’s shot did not rip goalie’s stomach open –Son

AUGUST 4, 2013 BY OLUFEMI ATOYEBI 1 COMMENT



Balogun
| credits: File copy
Forty one years after the death of Teslim ‘Thunder’ Balogun, Nigeria’s first player to star in the English Football League, his son, Kayode, tells OLUFEMI ATOYEBI that after his father returned from the UK, all was not well with the prolific striker who led Nigeria football team to the 1968 Olympics

How did your father combine his legendary role in Nigerian football with his functions as a father?

I knew little about my father because he died when we were young and most importantly, he travelled a lot. But I read a lot about him and heard so much about the type of person he was through his friends and my mother.

From the little time he spent with us, I will say he was a father with two faces. He was a strict disciplinarian who would never overlook a mistake made by any of his children. It was a feature he got as a footballer. Every sportsman must be disciplined to excel on the field. My father was no exemption and he ensured that he instilled the same quality in his children. It did not matter how old you were in those days, once you erred at home, you must be ready to face the penalty.

On the other hand, he was such a caring father because after telling you that you were wrong, he would bring you closer and embrace you as a child. He protected us all and provided for the family. During the short time he spent with his family, he did not ignore his responsibilities as a father. He was not rich but he was always there at the point of our needs.

Above all, my father was a religious person. He feared God and served Him with all he had. We observed all the prayers together and celebrated in a modest way when it was time to mark any of his children’s birthday or any event in the house. He helped many people and although I was young in those days, I noticed that many people came around to seek favours from my father. He gave what he had to people even if it meant that he would suffer.

How much of his career did you know?

My father was a celebrity, but he tried as much as possible to live a quiet live. That was why he trained his children to be humble. He did not drive a car befitting of his social or economic status. He was also always ready to help Nigeria whenever he was called upon. He died in 1972 at 45 but today, it was as if he lived up to 100 years. People loved him and they still show their love for him. Many people did not see him play but they eulogise him at every anniversary of his death.

Did he ever have the opportunity to call his children and tell them stories about himself?

He died at a time no one expected a healthy man to die. I am sure that as a normal human being, he did not prepare to die so soon. Otherwise, he would have called us together and told us things we did not know about him. However, we grew up to know about his background better.

His father, Oseni, was a star cricketer in the 20s; this was the period that my father was born. He grew up to know sports as a family business and he chose football as his own path to stardom. He had what sportsmen usually referred to as bow legs, which aided his skills as a footballer. He was seven feet tall and he used the height to his advantage.

He attended St. Patricks School, Oko-Awo in Lagos and St. Mary’s School, Port Harcourt and later Cosmopolitan Evening School. All along, he played for the schools’ football teams. By 19, he was the star of Apapa Bombers FC and scored the lone goal when they defeated one of the most formidable teams in Nigeria at the time, Railways XI. He moved on to play for Marine Athletic Club in 1946, UAC XI in 1947 and Railways in 1948. He also played for Union Line in the same year.

By 22, he had represented Nigeria many times and was selected as one of the players to represent the country during the UK Tour where Nigeria played many friendly matches against top clubs in the UK. They did not play with boots but bare feet, sometimes with only bandages around their feet. He joined Jos XI on his return and helped the team reach the final of the Challenge Cup for the first time in 1951 losing to Lagos Railways. After playing for eight first division clubs in 11 years, he left for the UK in 1955 to study printing technology but he was signed by Peterborough United.

In those days, football had more entertainment value than financial importance. If he had played today, he would have been a very rich man. Between 1955 and 1961 when he returned home, he played for a number of clubs, including Queens Park Rangers. He also did a coaching course to become the first UK-trained African coach. He played for Nigeria for 17 years and was the first Nigerian coach to lead Nigeria football team to the Olympics in 1968, drawing 3-3 with Brazil.

Why was your father given the name ‘Thunder’?

His fans gave him the name because he had great shot in both feet which could be likened to the force of thunder.

Where were you when he played in England?

We were all there with him but he brought everybody back when he was returning home in 1961. He did not want to come back but my mother persuaded him to return to Nigeria. When he was leaving in 1955, Nigeria did not want him to go so he travelled through Ghana.

Did you ever watch him play?

I had no opportunity to watch him play live on the pitch. The only time I would have watched him was during a friendly match at the Liberty Stadium in Ibadan (now Obafemi Awolowo Stadium), but the match was put off. I can’t remember why it was cancelled but that was my last chance to see him live in action.

Is it true that your father tore a goalkeeper’s stomach with a shot?

People said a lot of things about my father. Some of them are true, others false. Sometimes, I laugh after hearing some funny tales about my father. One of the funny tales is that of the goalkeeper who died after trying to stop my father’s shot. Well, the truth is that he did not tear his stomach with the shot. The goalkeeper had an injury trying to stop his shot and because the medical facility at the time was not as efficient as we have today, he died of injury. But my father did not have the intention of killing the goalkeeper with the shot. It was a match and he only tried to score for his side. My mother and uncles, who saw more of my father, told the children a lot about him.

How did your father get the special skills he displayed on the pitch?

He had many firsts in his life and when others were playing with boots, he played bare-footed in extreme cold regions in the UK. But those were attributes given by God. He gave few people such talent in each generation just as He had done with the greatest inventors of past generations. My father’s talent was recognised by the Queen of England and when he died, she sent a letter to my mother. We don’t know where the letter is again because my mother almost ran mad when my father died. So, she just put the letter somewhere. But she told us that the Queen sent a condolence letter.

Where were you when he died?

I was in the boarding house at the Comprehensive High School, Ayetoro. I was in form two. My two other brothers were also in the school. The last born in our family was a baby when our father died. Our guardian and counsellor, the late M.A. Kuti came to me in the hostel and told me that I had to travel to Ibadan with my brothers. We were confused because the last time my father came to coach the school’s football team, he told us he would take us abroad when he visited again. So, we thought it was time to go. I gave out some of my clothes to my friends thinking that I would be going abroad. I had never seen a dead man before so when I saw my dad corpse, I thought he was sleeping. I asked my mother why he was sleeping in a box (coffin) and why we had so many people in the house. She was just crying. Then I knew something bad had happened to the family.

His corpse was taken in a motorcade to Onikan Stadium in Lagos but when we arrived at the stadium, Lagosians became aggressive and started sending away every man with tribal mark. They said Ibadan people did not treat my father well and that was why he died early. The late Chief Lekan Salami had to disguise to enter the stadium for the lying-in-state.

Did your father have problems with Ibadan people?

He lived all his life serving Nigeria and worked as chief coach of the old Western Region, with Ibadan as his base. He was given the job by the late Chief Obafemi Awolowo but the former Premier did not know that my father was not treated well in Ibadan. He had a turbulent period working there because some of his entitlements were not paid. Maybe he was treated so because he was not an Ibadan man but he helped them train many great coaches including Jide Johnson. He was at a time abandoned but my mother persuaded him to continue. My mother told me everything.

How did your mother cope with the training of eight children alone?

It was a tough time for the family. We went through difficult times to survive but all thanks to God and my mother. There was no assistance from anywhere and she sold almost all her belongings including expensive jewellery, to train us.

How did your father die?

My mother said he called her in the night and they spoke about their life journey until around 2am when he eventually went to sleep. It was an unusual conversation but there was nothing to suggest that he was spending his last night with the family. In the morning, she tried to wake him up but he was gone. She called our family doctor, Dr. Olusanya, who confirmed that he was dead.

Could you remember your last meeting with him?

It was when he came to train my school team at Comprehensive High School Ayetoro. One of my brothers was the best player in the school but my father told the team after training that my brother, whom we all thought was a great dribbler, was after all a bad player. We were all dumbfounded by his remark. That was our last meeting before he died.

How about your mother?

Unfortunately, we lost her after all the troubles. She suffered a lot but she did not live long enough to enjoy the fruits of her labour. She developed high blood pressure after losing my father but we managed her condition for more than 30 years before she died. We celebrated our mother’s 60th birthday in 1998 but on the same day, she went into a coma for 18 days before she died. Chief Molade Okoya was the chairman during the birthday ceremony.

Did she have any regret before she died?

She was not happy with Oyo State because of the way the Ibadan people treated my father. The state did not support our family after my father’s death.

Did she tell you how she met your father?

My mother, Mulikat, was a table tennis player and very elegant. She had no male friends but through her brothers who were footballers, my father had access to her and approached her. They married in the 50s. Chief Molade Okoya played a role in my parents’ relationship. My mother was in her late 20s when we lost our father.

You and your siblings took after your father by playing football. How was it like stepping into his shoes?

That was not possible. No one can be like Thunder Balogun and when I played for clubs in Nigeria, I was not looking forward to be like him. All of us knew that he was a special individual and we did not have his talent. We were able to assist my mother with the training of our younger siblings from the income we got from playing football.

I played more than the rest, playing for NEPA, Stores, Water Corporation, First Bank and Abiola Babes. I would have earned more money in Abiola Babes but my mother told me to leave because she did not want me to play for the late Chief MKO Abiola club. I think she was reacting to something that happened a long time ago. I chose to play for Abiola to show that our family had nothing against him but my mother insisted that I should quit the club.

I remember sharing the same room with Mitchel Obi (sports journalist) in the university. Each time we had a match, he would come to me and give me a meal ticket so that I could have strength. It was a big support, one among the many I never got.

Where are your other siblings?

I have seven siblings. They are Tunde, Tokunbo, Olamide, Jibola, Iyabo, Bioye and Oluwole. Most of them have returned to the UK. We are all doing well now but it’s painful that our mother is not alive to witness what we have been doing to immortalise our father.

Will you say that Nigeria has done enough to recognise your father’s contribution to the development of sports in the country?

Well at least, Lagos State has done well to recognise him. A major stadium is named after him and there is a foundation in his name wihich the late Olu Lagunju was fully involved its establishment. We are celebrating the 41st anniversary of my father’s death and it’s unfortunate that Lagunju is not around again to play his role. I must also thank the Lagos State Governor Babatunde Fashola who has done a lot to immortalise my father.

Did your father die a fulfilled man?

Like I said earlier, he was a special individual and I believed that he enjoyed himself. He had fun playing around the world and socially, he enjoyed himself. He loved taking a little beer when he was relaxed. He had great time with his children, taking us to the field and teaching us how to play football.

Would you have wished that he was not a famous person if that would have preserved his life?

God brought him to this world to fulfil a purpose and He chose a path for him to excel. We have no power over that. Being famous made him a respected person and I think I would pray that he comes back to this world as a sportsman.

7 things you didn’t know about my parents

• He died in his sleep

• He travelled to the UK through Ghana because Nigeria did not want him to go

• He spoke with my mum till 2am on the day he died

• He was not flamboyant

• He was the first African to be awarded a coaching certificate in the UK

• He taught his children how to play football

•The Queen of England sent a condolence letter when he died

http://www.punchng.com/feature/famous-p ... -open-son/



Some things just do not add up in this interview. The guy is probably making up stories or he just cannot appreciate numbers.

_________________
TOUCH NOT MY ANOINTED...
Quote:
For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God. For it is written, I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will bring to nothing the understanding...hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? 21 For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 4:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 19, 2008 4:02 am
Posts: 1738
Location: New York
Teslim Thunder Balogun, a legend of the beautiful game

_________________
Goldenera94


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 3:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2003 7:55 pm
Posts: 7935
Gotti wrote:
Hard Man wrote:
Image

That must be Pa OHSEE and CIC in the shirt and sweater in the back row... :lol:
<


:rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf: :rotf:


Cheers.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2013 12:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2004 11:19 pm
Posts: 30181
Chei!!
Barefooted? :shock:

_________________
Image
Nigeria shall wallop the dormitable lions


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2013 5:04 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2005 6:49 pm
Posts: 72857
Location: Accra, Old Trafford, Takoradi, Canada
anointed wrote:
Now 41 years...

Quote:
His father, Oseni, was a star cricketer in the 20s; this was the period that my father was born. He grew up to know sports as a family business and he chose football as his own path to stardom. He had what sportsmen usually referred to as bow legs, which aided his skills as a footballer. He was seven feet tall and he used the height to his advantage.


Some things just do not add up in this interview. The guy is probably making up stories or he just cannot appreciate numbers.


nice read though

_________________

Fine Jersey FC

WC Quarter Finals sweet o
DNA no good o


@the Mod who deleted my Fine Jersey FC crying thread...dis 1-2 pain you


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: bepanda, Google [Bot], kalani JR and 31 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group