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Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 1:48 pm
by txj
"Modern football goes all about rhythm, timing, spacing and exceptional technical and mental skills. The CogiTraining Method allows initially “normal” players to internalize the essential ingredient of modern football, that is: speed of vision, speed of decision-making, speed of execution. SenseBall is one specific tool of the CogiTraining Method, which guarantees the individual technical development."


http://www.cogitraining.com/en/

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:09 pm
by Ugbowo
txj wrote:1. Football is a simple game. But most of all, football is an unselfish game

2. It begins with the individual recognizing that it is first and foremost not about him; that his talent is not for his benefit nor does it belong to him.

3. More importantly that the best expression of his talent is achieved by placing it at the service of the team.

4. But ultimately every player stands first on his unique individuality.

5. Reconciling these two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts is the ultimate challenge of the modern game.

6. In Nigeria, kids grow to become footballers on the strength of their individuality. They are self taught and self made, sometimes fully formed in their understanding of the game ever before their first contact with formal coaching.

7. This is why I have often thought, like Forrest Gump, that working with homebased players is like getting a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!

8. The real challenge of working with them is not their talent or lack thereof, but the ability to get each one to subordinate themselves by completely buying into the concept of the team game. In the process, placing their individual skills at the service of the team.
Txj my man,

Did u have Mikel in mind when u wrote this? :taunt: :taunt:

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 4:38 pm
by Bigpokey24
Ugbowo wrote:
txj wrote:1. Football is a simple game. But most of all, football is an unselfish game

2. It begins with the individual recognizing that it is first and foremost not about him; that his talent is not for his benefit nor does it belong to him.

3. More importantly that the best expression of his talent is achieved by placing it at the service of the team.

4. But ultimately every player stands first on his unique individuality.

5. Reconciling these two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts is the ultimate challenge of the modern game.

6. In Nigeria, kids grow to become footballers on the strength of their individuality. They are self taught and self made, sometimes fully formed in their understanding of the game ever before their first contact with formal coaching.

7. This is why I have often thought, like Forrest Gump, that working with homebased players is like getting a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!

8. The real challenge of working with them is not their talent or lack thereof, but the ability to get each one to subordinate themselves by completely buying into the concept of the team game. In the process, placing their individual skills at the service of the team.
Txj my man,

Did u have Mikel in mind when u wrote this? :taunt: :taunt:
:rotf: :rotf: :rotf: bobo just shrinned Mikel without even knowing it..

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 4:50 pm
by txj
Ugbowo wrote:
txj wrote:1. Football is a simple game. But most of all, football is an unselfish game

2. It begins with the individual recognizing that it is first and foremost not about him; that his talent is not for his benefit nor does it belong to him.

3. More importantly that the best expression of his talent is achieved by placing it at the service of the team.

4. But ultimately every player stands first on his unique individuality.

5. Reconciling these two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts is the ultimate challenge of the modern game.

6. In Nigeria, kids grow to become footballers on the strength of their individuality. They are self taught and self made, sometimes fully formed in their understanding of the game ever before their first contact with formal coaching.

7. This is why I have often thought, like Forrest Gump, that working with homebased players is like getting a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!

8. The real challenge of working with them is not their talent or lack thereof, but the ability to get each one to subordinate themselves by completely buying into the concept of the team game. In the process, placing their individual skills at the service of the team.
Txj my man,

Did u have Mikel in mind when u wrote this? :taunt: :taunt:

Mikel is a team player at Chelsea, albeit in a very narrow role, but one who lacks personal ambition to maximize his abilities.

You can maximize ur abilities within the team game.

Your problem is, u only seem capable of thinking in one direction at a time!

The fact ur takeaway from the article is the above is quite sad....

I give up on CE!

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:07 pm
by Bigpokey24
txj wrote:
Ugbowo wrote:
txj wrote:1. Football is a simple game. But most of all, football is an unselfish game

2. It begins with the individual recognizing that it is first and foremost not about him; that his talent is not for his benefit nor does it belong to him.

3. More importantly that the best expression of his talent is achieved by placing it at the service of the team.

4. But ultimately every player stands first on his unique individuality.

5. Reconciling these two seemingly diametrically opposed concepts is the ultimate challenge of the modern game.

6. In Nigeria, kids grow to become footballers on the strength of their individuality. They are self taught and self made, sometimes fully formed in their understanding of the game ever before their first contact with formal coaching.

7. This is why I have often thought, like Forrest Gump, that working with homebased players is like getting a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!

8. The real challenge of working with them is not their talent or lack thereof, but the ability to get each one to subordinate themselves by completely buying into the concept of the team game. In the process, placing their individual skills at the service of the team.
Txj my man,

Did u have Mikel in mind when u wrote this? :taunt: :taunt:

Mikel is a team player at Chelsea, albeit in a very narrow role, but one who lacks personal ambition to maximize his abilities.

You can maximize ur abilities within the team game.

Your problem is, u only seem capable of thinking in one direction at a time!

The fact ur takeaway from the article is the above is quite sad....

I give up on CE!
please do, while you are it, make sure you carry mary poppings with you

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:15 pm
by maceo4
Txj, you cant look at the game so individualistically, you must also take into account the decision making of the other team mates which will end up determining/providing the options from which the individual has to choose from and make his split second decision...

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:32 pm
by txj
maceo4 wrote:Txj, you cant look at the game so individualistically, you must also take into account the decision making of the other team mates which will end up determining/providing the options from which the individual has to choose from and make his split second decision...
Not the game. The development of the player.

But the goal is to equip him with the tools to make the best decision in aid of the team game.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 8:42 pm
by nanijoe
Apparently (from the OT), the most important aspect of football is decision making...

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 11:56 pm
by txj
nanijoe wrote:Apparently (from the OT), the most important aspect of football is decision making...
On the pitch, on game day, that's what it basically comes down to.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 12:14 pm
by Kabalega
TXJ Missed the whole idea.

Soccer like life, is a team sport. Sure you can go it alone, but friends and real meaningful connections get the most out of each individual. It is why txj logs-in to CE, when he otherwise you would have stuck to his blog. Friendlies are supposed to help coaches build on this team concept where players learn to trust each other and fight for each other like real life brothers.

For example, If the team lacks an ideal RB, they learn to compensate and collectively work with whom they have in that position. If a player gets lost with the ball, his band of brothers will correct him and lead him to the right decision, if he trusts in them. The individual player is not alone and does not operate in a vacuum.

A team is not just a collection of individuals, but a tight knit group of individuals who work together for a common good. The best teams like the Germans look like well oiled efficiency machines.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 12:46 pm
by txj
Kabalega wrote:TXJ Missed the whole idea.

Soccer like life, is a team sport. Sure you can go it alone, but friends and real meaningful connections get the most out of each individual. It is why txj logs-in to CE, when he otherwise you would have stuck to his blog. Friendlies are supposed to help coaches build on this team concept where players learn to trust each other and fight for each other like real life brothers.

For example, If the team lacks an ideal RB, they learn to compensate and collectively work with whom they have in that position. If a player gets lost with the ball, his band of brothers will correct him and lead him to the right decision, if he trusts in them. The individual player is not alone and does not operate in a vacuum.

A team is not just a collection of individuals, but a tight knit group of individuals who work together for a common good. The best teams like the Germans look like well oiled efficiency machines.

No you totally missed my point.

The concept of the team game is enhanced by equipping each individual player with the tools to make the best possible decision, within the constraints of time and space, to benefit the team game. Not himself, but the team.

In otherwords, the team grows, to the extent that individuals within it grow, by the factor of their ability to make good decisions.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:25 pm
by Kabalega
txj wrote:
Kabalega wrote:TXJ Missed the whole idea.

Soccer like life, is a team sport. Sure you can go it alone, but friends and real meaningful connections get the most out of each individual. It is why txj logs-in to CE, when he otherwise you would have stuck to his blog. Friendlies are supposed to help coaches build on this team concept where players learn to trust each other and fight for each other like real life brothers.

For example, If the team lacks an ideal RB, they learn to compensate and collectively work with whom they have in that position. If a player gets lost with the ball, his band of brothers will correct him and lead him to the right decision, if he trusts in them. The individual player is not alone and does not operate in a vacuum.

A team is not just a collection of individuals, but a tight knit group of individuals who work together for a common good. The best teams like the Germans look like well oiled efficiency machines.

No you totally missed my point.

The concept of the team game is enhanced by equipping each individual player with the tools to make the best possible decision, within the constraints of time and space, to benefit the team game. Not himself, but the team.

In otherwords, the team grows, to the extent that individuals within it grow, by the factor of their ability to make good decisions.
No I did not miss your point but you missed mine. You are approaching the idea from the wrong side of things.

You are putting the cart before the horse.

For an individual player to make the "right" decision, they have to buy into the team plan and that decision has to be for the good of the team. The team comes first but there will be a few rebels and that is OK. Every team needs a few of them.

For example in SA 2010, 9ja vs Argentina, Osaze should have passed to Obagoal who was in a better position to score. He ended up dribbling the ball out for a goal kick. On the surface of it, this incident might support your idea, but if Osaze had bought into the ethos of the team, he would not even have thought twice. He would have found a way to make the cross to Obagoal who was in a better position. It's kind of the chicken and egg thing but in this case the team comes first. Unprepared teams have lots of individuals making the wrong decisions.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:06 am
by txj
Kabalega wrote:
txj wrote:
Kabalega wrote:TXJ Missed the whole idea.

Soccer like life, is a team sport. Sure you can go it alone, but friends and real meaningful connections get the most out of each individual. It is why txj logs-in to CE, when he otherwise you would have stuck to his blog. Friendlies are supposed to help coaches build on this team concept where players learn to trust each other and fight for each other like real life brothers.

For example, If the team lacks an ideal RB, they learn to compensate and collectively work with whom they have in that position. If a player gets lost with the ball, his band of brothers will correct him and lead him to the right decision, if he trusts in them. The individual player is not alone and does not operate in a vacuum.

A team is not just a collection of individuals, but a tight knit group of individuals who work together for a common good. The best teams like the Germans look like well oiled efficiency machines.

No you totally missed my point.

The concept of the team game is enhanced by equipping each individual player with the tools to make the best possible decision, within the constraints of time and space, to benefit the team game. Not himself, but the team.

In otherwords, the team grows, to the extent that individuals within it grow, by the factor of their ability to make good decisions.
No I did not miss your point but you missed mine. You are approaching the idea from the wrong side of things.

You are putting the cart before the horse.

For an individual player to make the "right" decision, they have to buy into the team plan and that decision has to be for the good of the team. The team comes first but there will be a few rebels and that is OK. Every team needs a few of them.

For example in SA 2010, 9ja vs Argentina, Osaze should have passed to Obagoal who was in a better position to score. He ended up dribbling the ball out for a goal kick. On the surface of it, this incident might support your idea, but if Osaze had bought into the ethos of the team, he would not even have thought twice. He would have found a way to make the cross to Obagoal who was in a better position. It's kind of the chicken and egg thing but in this case the team comes first. Unprepared teams have lots of individuals making the wrong decisions.

The highlighted section of my earlier post addresses the issue. I think it is simple and clear enough...

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 8:24 am
by Kabalega
TXJ, we are on the same page but with a slight subtlety.

Try this on for size......

Keshi's team has a weakness at RB. Efe Ambrose, is a poor tackler, and likes to bomb forward but rarely makes that killer cross when he does so. I think he is more of a natural defensive MF but some would prefer him as a CB. He has other qualities too.

According to your theory, Keshi and Celtic would have to equip Efe Ambrose, with tools that would make him a better tackler and crosser of the ball. Of course within the context of either team. Fair enough. However, Efe Ambrose, might not improve in those areas, might somewhat improve or eventually - with time- become good. In the meantime, the rest of the team (that word again) would have to adjust accordingly in order to win.

If Efe Ambrose, does not improve in these areas what then? Blame the coaches? Heck, even Jesus lost one disciple. If Efe is not going to put the fear of God in an opponent with a good tackle, someone else will have to step up and do it. When they do so, Efe would have to cover them up somehow. If he does so perfectly, then there would be less need to equip him with tools to improve his individual tackling and crossing skills. BTW, Ambrose is a decent reader of the game, that is why he does not rely on tackles so much. But it is a necessary skill for a defender.
That synergy is way more powerful than equipping individual players with better tools on the green grass.

Ever heard of a story where a dozen people were invited to a very good banquet. The food was over the top. Unfortunately, everybody's elbow was turned inside out. When they all sat at a table, they couldn't feed themselves unless they ate like dogs which would ruin the whole experience. Guess what they did to enjoy the banquet? :D

Re:

Posted: Sat Mar 15, 2014 3:50 pm
by txj
@ Kabalega: See below. It begins with the choice of players.

txj wrote:A critical aspect which is not in the version I posted would naturally be player selection.

This approach would require the recruitment of quick witted players, with great adaptability, versatility, balance, speed and impeccable ball control skills.

As I see it currently, about half of the players in the SE team would not qualify for call up.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Sat Mar 15, 2014 5:04 pm
by Coach
Brethren, let it be known that, BeniTx builds his philosophy from the bob, weave, shoulder roll and jab of fabulous Floyd Mayweather. There are those who may argue, Michael Katsidis or Carl Froch, would be a worthier approach. Neither boasts the invincibility of the former, but battle scarred, bloody nosed and at times, unconscious, they have fought the fight men dream of, a slugfest, no guard, haymakers and grey matter clobbered to functional irrelevance. Get shhhstuck in derrrr, avsummadaaaaaaaat! Which leads to the inevitable, big Bobby Huth, huge fifty:fifty, studs up, eyes on the man alone, huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge Ryan Shawcross, man to man for the corners, handful of shirt, Greg Cameron up for it, Charlie Adam, low blows aplenty, talk less of the weather...could he do it?

Re: Re:

Posted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 4:48 am
by Kabalega
txj wrote:@ Kabalega: See below. It begins with the choice of players.

txj wrote:A critical aspect which is not in the version I posted would naturally be player selection.

This approach would require the recruitment of quick witted players, with great adaptability, versatility, balance, speed and impeccable ball control skills.

As I see it currently, about half of the players in the SE team would not qualify for call up.
You forgot the locker room.

Just ask Keshi, Osaze, Ike Uche, Fergie/Roy Keane, .....

Give a good coach time with a group of hey yous who get along very well and you will have a team that will beat your team full of individually skilled players. It is a team sport and there is more to a good omelet than good eggs.

BTW, did you find the solution to the banquet full of disabled people who could not feed themselves?

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:31 pm
by txj
Brilliant piece by Jorge Valdano..

Let’s not allow the uncertainty of results, the patriotic feeling football provokes or the increasing money generated by this fantastic industry to distract us from the evolution of the game itself, the play. Regressive tactics advance at greater speed than creative ones and the obsession with statistics contributes to that.

At this World Cup, more than ever before, we want to know everything with mathematical precision, even though football is beautiful when two and two don’t make four. Or when South Korea beat Germany, say.

We want calculations to be proven correct before the game has even started. Big data and mathematical projections are making their way on to the field of play to tell us things I don’t want to know. We love football for its imprecision, its moments of genius and its mistakes, when the ball bounces badly and the left-back plays terribly because he’s had a fight with his girlfriend before the game. And there’s no equation that can explain that.

Of course the data helps but in the world of play, like in art, we have to put a limit on it because these are realms of freedom. The big problem is that with every step we take towards “scientific certainties”, players lose a little more freedom. Freedom for what? To think. There’s a reason they’re the protagonists.

It’s worth clarifying, so that you know who’s talking to you here, that I love football more than I love a team, that I admire any given player more than the greatest manager, that the ball fascinates me as much as the “science” of the game. In fact, I think football is the opposite of technology precisely because of its exaggeratedly human condition: contradictory, primitive, emotional. So you’ll understand that I see VAR as an aberration, for example. If we want justice, let’s fight for it – but in real life, not on a football pitch. Football is a child of its time, of a moment, and that identity as a primitive game exempts it from the need to be all modern and cutting edge. Yes, I know: it’s a losing battle.

The big problem is that with every step we take towards “scientific certainties”, players lose a little more freedom
Anyway, let’s continue. For some time now, a silent battle has been fought between those who know about football because they played it and that taught them endless things – lots of ex-players don’t even know all that they know – and those who, while they know less, explain it better because university gave them knowledge and the tools of persuasion.

When football club directors are in a bind all they want is someone to lie to them offering a version of events that is optimistic and irrefutable, based on “scientific” evidence. (Speech marks are vitally important every time the word science is used applied to football.) The battle is being won by the educated. But a word of warning: we are underestimating, and risk losing, the huge amount of wisdom that exists on the side of those who don’t even know all that they know.

Johan Cruyff understood that well and always mistrusted intruders. I’m not talking about coaches who never played – there are too many brilliant cases for that – but the army of people getting close to the game with sophisticated ideas that appear to have the solution to every problem. Some are obsessed with the mind, others the body, still more with tactics. They forget that players are people who play. It’s very useful to integrate every element, but the main one continues to reside somewhere in their instinct.


An example: there are “revolutionary” advances (more speech marks) like using drones to film and analyse training sessions, allowing you to see what is happening from above. Daft and pointless, whichever way you look at it. But, careful, here’s the thing: the coach that doesn’t have a drone gets labelled old-fashioned even by the players themselves and that’s terrible if they want to stay in a job.

We know a lot. Like the fact that a player ran 12.345 kilometres. It’s an admirable figure, in athletic terms. But, did he run to help? To get in the way? To give the ball to a team-mate? Or to an opponent? To bring order? Chaos? As he ran, did he think? We need the context. If not, let’s leave the numbers for something else.

As I always liked this game when the ball is at a player’s feet, let’s analyse another stat: the one that says a player touched the ball 100 times and did so with a 95% success rate. Javier Mascherano was the player who touched the ball more times in a single game than anyone else in the group phase – more than 140 touches against Iceland. Did Mascherano play well? That’s another story. Because the players with the second- and third-most touches in that game were Argentina’s two centre-backs, a sign that the passes were routine, inoffensive, without purpose. They didn’t threaten the opponent, they didn’t break through lines. They didn’t fulfil the first rule of any attacking move: eliminate opponents. But analysing football through numbers rather than letters seems to comfort specialists, as if it offered incontestable evidence and thus certainty. There are players who are unmarked but keep running, presumably so that the kilometre count doesn’t make them look bad.

And where do the players stand in this evolution of the game? With every step, they become just another piece in the machinery. That requites discipline, responsibility, solidarity, sacrifice – all virtues found in a good citizen. As we continue on this path, intensity defeats the ability to pause, to slow down; passing defeats dribbling; predictability defeats trickery ... and on it goes. The coach wants control and that’s easier to achieve without the ball than with it, working on defensive movements rather than offensive ones, the ball stopped rather than in motion. As Antoine Griezmann said after the sad draw between France and Denmark: this is just the way it is.
https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... of-science

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Thu Nov 24, 2022 3:16 pm
by txj
Coach wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 1:09 pm
txj wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 1:06 pmThis was always a poor Cameroonian team. The teams that didn't qualify are even poorer
African football has plateaued. Considerably. The paradox remains, why do these players, some not all, employ cortical activity at club level, yet cometh the call to represent the nation, no brain activity whatsoever.

IMO Africa cannot win the WC within the framework in which football football is defined and practiced today.

I have watched a lot of football over the years. I have especially watched young Nigerian players and tried to see the game through their eyes- how they see the game originally, without the coaching, the referee, the rules; without all the the 'intermediaries' and 'encumberances'.

In terms of how the game is defined and played today, African players will never reach the full bloom of their original promise. It wont stop them from being top, top players like a Jon Mikel Obi, but only in the context of the dominant, reductionist concept of the game.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Thu Nov 24, 2022 5:52 pm
by Robotnik
Yep. There is a science to it, but if players cannot trap ball there is only so far they can go.

Re: Lessons the WC Taught me: A new theory of the game!

Posted: Fri Nov 25, 2022 2:07 am
by Eaglezbeak
It’s only the first round of games.